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MECCANO 








average 



a 260-ton 




surmou 



remar 





orme 





LM.S. 





rmcess 



Driver T, J. Clarke, on a special run in 



Price, complete 




owning 
uction 





terH 






oer 



ation 




The 



moae 



i 

d 



purchased also 

the new Hornby Deferred 



present- 
;. Od 

may be 
through 



+ ■ 

merely 

same qualities of power, spee 



miniature, 



one 




an 




e 




possi 



ib! 



e 





e 



atest product o 



ciency! 



! Thi 



engine; 
aving 





s is now made 





eccano 



Ltd. 



_ 




e magnificent 




Hornby scale model locomotive "Princess Elizabeth. 

photog 



V 



Loo 




a 



tth 



e 



ra 




above! What a splendid appearance 




e moae 





as 




m 




Sch 



erne 



Ask 



you i 







eaier 



or 



details. 



wt 



th its 



massive six-cou 



(Not available ou 



tsid 



e 



an 



Great Britain and Northern 



w 



dR 

ith 




e 



oyal nameplate! It is 



d dri 
dri 



ven 



ng wheels, fascinating valve gear, 

a 20-volt electric motor, fitted 





e wor 



id-f 



amous 



Horn 




Remote Control. 



relan 









MECCANO LIMIT 





* 



BINNS ROAD 



LIV 




RPOOL 









THE 




MAGAZINE 



1 




MYSTERIOUS 

BLUE 




The 




200 




REGENT ST., LONDON, W.I 



OUR ONLY ADDRESS 







Telephone: REGENT 3161 




No. 26 




ovember, 1937 























Ml 






designed to project cigarette 
cards, stamps and miniature 



camera snap 



shot 



s ; gives 



brilliant two foot image on the 



screen at a throw of four to 



AND ITS ELDER BROTHER 







PRICE 



Battery 6d. Post 4d. 




five feet 





operates wi 
single lamp o 



ith 



a 





main and will project 

pictures 



all sizes 




upto3J"x2*"-with 



amazing 




PRICE 



arity. 



With etectric lamp 

(State mains voltage 
when ordering] 




Post 6d. 








Watch 




eir 




astounding 

antics; seeing 

is believing and you won't 
believe them till you have 
seen them for yourself. They're 
up to all manner o 








anous 





trick 



s an 




drolleries 



Post 2d 



THE 







FLY 



rr 





Now 




ere m 




orfe 



red at 
iall 



e world is a tore 
so great a value an 





so small a price 



.Th 




e iaeai poc 



ket 



light. Length 4", adjustable focus, 
chromium plated 





ana com- 



plete with battery. (Foreign.) 



PRICE 






Post 3d. 





The 'G' Man Sparking Automatic 



is a fascinating 




an 




quite 

armless. It is a clockwork pistol 
which continues to fire for a con- 










st 





erable time with one pull of 

M * 



trigger. 



(Foreign.) 












PRICE 



Post 3d. 



STATIONARY 



STEAM 



ENGIN 




really beautiful mode! steam 



engine 



with 



tall chimney, 



steam whistle an 




valve 

. r 



* 




ilelik 



safety 
e toy o 



scientific interest, yet 
easy to work an 




a 




o 



W. 



lutely 



sate. 






10 





wniie 



Post 6d 



it amuses. (Foreign) 




■ * 

Ii 



THE MECCANO 







% 



< 



C 



'< 








MAGAZINE 



■ * ■ 



in 





l 












MICKEY MOUSE-CHARLIE CHAPLIN 

HEAPS 

CORONATION 




REAL 



SHOW 



Bingoscope is a mechanics 





ector that shows brilli- 

and is in every way the 




costing 

it is solidly built to last, and designed to take 
9.5 mm. non flam Films. Ask for a demonstration 



K 




at your toy shop or stores. But first write for 
the illustrated leaflet, and a free gift that will 



MAINS MODEL 




MADE IT! ENGLAND 



THE LEADING JUVENILE CINEMA 







Write now for the Safety Dart Board and for the new Bingoscope 



C 




Safety Dart 




w 






ith 



Send 



ru 



bb 



er-nose 



Boar 
d dart. 



illustrated leaflet to L Rees & Co. Ltd, (Dept. KM.), 12, New 
Union Street, London, E.C2. 

Na 



me 




e Coupon now! 





«■ ft «« h «**#»**>> * | ||iiM«»t**nli|ll««iH|I.I.Ot-'Mi|i( ».-. . i i #■•*.» M • ' I I • I fc I * S | % | - f i 



IV 




MECCANO MAGAZINE 




THE 



RANGE 



OF 



HORNBY 



Complete Equipment 




or 



COMPLETE MODEL RAILWAYS 






commencing 






ascinating 






MS Complete Model Railway 

Consists of Locomotive (non-reversing) and Tender, Track, 
Goods Wagons;, and other components lor an attractive 
small home railway. Packed in carton. Price 8'11 





o 





Railway 




o 



bby 






Hornby Complete Model Railway Sets provide 



M9 Complete Model Railway 

The Locomotive and Tender are similar to those in Ih© 
M8 Set. There are Passenger Coaches in place of the 

Wagons, more Track and extra components- 
Packed in carton. Price 11 '6 







the simplest way of beginning the thrilling Hor 




Railway hobby. Four Sets are available and each 
is complete in itself; everything is there, ready for 



MTO Complete Model Railway 

- 

A larger Set, packed in a special cabinet. A fine range 
of components is included in addition to a Locomotive 
(non-reversing]. Tender and Coaches, Price 18'9 



use as soon as you 




it home. 



Unpac 





■ 




e box, then lay out 

in the illustrati 




e rails an 






on 



provid 



e 




Mil Complete Model Railway 

This is the besl of I he four Sets. It includes a fine 
reversing Tank Locomotive and all the accessories to 
make the splendid model railway illustrated below, The 
neat cabinet in which the Set is packed is shown in 
the reproduction herewith. Price 25 # -» 



put 




ocomotive 





or wagons 






your own railway! It's 



MECCANO LTD. BINNS ROAD 



t 



How effectively the 
components of the 

Mil Complete Model 
Railway can be laid 
out is shewn in this 
H lustration* 



The M J J Complete 
todd Railway as 
packed in special 
presentation cabinet . 









THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



V 




STUPENDOUS ATTRACTION 



EXCLUSIVE 



GAMAGES 



A JOYOUS CRUISE TO MACIC 




CYPT 



AND GREATEST P. & O. LUXURY LINER STRATHEDEN 

A delightful, realistic Christmas season voyage, going ashore to the Valley of the Kings 

— __ J .^ L _ d^^ ? if j_ l_.ll jt ..«-(:._ I . # J^* I - _ I - ' * * • » ■ i 



and the Gift Hall of a thousand surprises. Glamorous Egyptian maidens will greet you 
here, and bestow the riches of the East upon you. And would you 
Christmas himself is seeking a warmer clime this year, and he wi 

with his lucky parcels. 
Don't miss this unique attraction — on Ground Floor from 

■ 









i 







WW* 


Mm < 

1 

9 




1 














j;r. 



»■-■ 






• 



■ m 



» v » * « 



*% 



* «*: 



si? 



#* * 



BRITAIN'S SUPREME CHRISTMAS SHOW FOR BOYS 



ALL 



fa * t 



\m% 



% • * 



"\- 



*»- 



** \ 



OPtHS 



tftRtf 



WQMEM5B 






^National Headquarters for Meccano 

Hornby Trains and Speed 



■KGreatly Enlarged Displays 



the 






ove 






an Outstanding Feature 

the Bazaar 



THl NAME 



the 



Giant Hornby Layout — 



GUARANTEES 
THE VALUE 



Three Trains running 
*An Unequalled Selection 



once 



Toys, 
and 



Models, Games, Chemistry 
Electrical Sets, Model Aeroplanes, 

f Expert Demonstrations Daily 



VERTICAL 






STEAM ENGINE 



splendid Steam Engine 

at a remarkably low price. 

It represents the best pos* 
sible value In the cheaper 

of steam engines. 

etc with Safety 

Whistle. Filler, Can 

and Lamp. _ m 

Height^/ 

10* rn. 

Post 6tb Foreign 



range 
Cor 

and 



READY MID-NOVEMBER 

GAMAGES GIANT CHRISTMAS TOYS, 

MODELS, AND GAMES LIST 

Post Freo on Request 



5 ft. SOLID OAK 

BILLIARD TABLE 



Laminated Bed of Superior Quality, 
Scientifically Battened to obviate 

Warping. 









DELIVERED ON FIRST 

SIX MONTHLY 

PAYMENTS OF 



!, 



%&.- 



.*.■ 






POPULAR 

PANEL 

FOOTBALL 

Splendid qua I- 

i t y leather. 
Hand sewn* Sup- 
plied complete 
with bee and 
best quality red 
rubber bladder. Match si 
The Football for hard use. 



■ 



1. 



«tr^\ 






Also Size i, 



i 



r 



J, 



I 



/ 



Post 






SET 
CLOVES 



BOYS' BOXING 

PUNCHBALL 



The Finest Value Obtainable 




The Punchball 

from good 
quality Chrome 
Suede Leather, with 

six sections. Fitted 
Jr in. moulded resili- 
ent rubber strands 

ft pi i §• 

and g in. straps, with 

nickel ring at each 

end, floor and ceiling 

hooks* 

The Boxing 

Gloves have 
Covers of select- 
ed Tan Sheep 
Skin and pafmsof 
Buff Suede 
Leather, Fitted 

with finger and 
side pads, and 

IB ■ 

aced wrists. 

uatcly pad* 

ded with hair. 
Punchball and 

of Four 
Boxing Gloves 



■ i 




i 



T- 



■ r 




1 < 












t 




THIS WILL KEEP 

YOU FIT. 

Post 9d. 

Or separately: PUNCHBALL. 8/ll, 

FOUR BOXING GLOVES, S/6 

Post 6d. on either. 




.■-■■ 



■T ■" 



i-Ji 






lia.y.i a 



I . 



«"' 



hg 



W 



Carri 



5 ft. 



(Overall size 

by 2 ft. 9 In.) 



nearest 
railway station Eng* or Walts* 
The cushion rails are of the "Carnage* 1 heavy design. Solid Para Rubber 
Cushions positioned to ensure maximum resiliency and billiard table 
"angle 11 accuracy. Bed and cushions covered with English woven cloth. 
Pocket plates leather covered and fitted cord pocket nets. Adjustable 

rubber-covered feet for levelling, 

COMPLETE WITH THESE ACCESSORIES— Set of Guaranteed 
turned Composition l| in. Billiard Balls. Two 4 ft* Cues, large 
Marking Board fitted with brass runners and pointers, Chalk 
and Booklet of Rules. Also supplied finished beautiful 
Mahogany colour-same price. Or with a 16/6 Snooker Set, £3/6/ 
Or 6 monthly payments of 12/-. Booklet of Snooker Rules (/ 



— -< 



, m 



r 



Obtainable onlv a! Gamases 



with two rac 



cars 



M" 






t impress tan of 
the tars racing almost 



the track 



THEFAMOUS "SPEEDWAY" with Two Cars 



The entire Track, when assembled, measures 57 in. long by 25 4 in - wide. Each 
section is firmly fixed together by clips. The two clockwork Cars measure 4 in,, 

and are fitted with brakes. Two keys are included. With one winding the Cars 
will lap the track seven or eight times at racing speed, Three or *r W*M *M 
four Cars can be raced simultaneously and greatly add to the excite- f% II 
merit and fun. COMPLETE ^^ ■■ 

Past 6d m 



Extra Cars 



each 



(Foreign). 









i— 






. ! 



, i 



V\ 



VJi 



fr-" -■ 






is 



Two Popular Games 

e Price of One! 

COMBINATION RING 

and DART BOARDS 



more 



Games of skill that are coming more and 

into demand. The Ring Board is well 
finished In mahogany colour, highly 
polished, and fitted with heavy quality 
brass hooks, each numbered above in Red 
and Gold. With six heavy rubber rings. 
On the reverse side is the fully wired 

cork Dart Board of standard clock 
pattern. Supplied wich three feather 
flighted darts. A 
leaflet containing the 
rules of darts is 
included, COMPLETE 

Post 8(L 




GAMAGES, HOLBORN, LONDON, E.C.I. 



Telephone: Holhorn 8484 



VI 




MECCANO MAGAZINE 




Marvels of science and electricity are opening up new realms of interest for 
boys. Think how thrilled you'll be to learn about amazing scientific triumphs 



while you enjoy grand fun. Gilbert products teach while they entertain. They 



are more than toys. They give you hours and hours of marvellous amusement 
and enable you to gain valuable knowledge. Ask to see Gilbert products at 
your local stores and toy shops. But first of alt, post the coupon below for 
Free Catalogue. 








xplore New Worlds of 



Mystery! 



MICRO 






TS 



■ 

Hidden from the nuked eye there is a mystery world 
full of astonishing creatures and excitinff secrets* 

A drop of stagnant water is teeming with life* 

■ 

Weird wonders are disclosed hy the Microscope 

in Gilbert Micro-Chemistry Sets, There is also 

* big assortment of chemicals and apparatus for 
performing hundreds of experiments* The mystery 
of Folar Rays is explained by the remarkable 
"Polaroid/* Complete with Instruction 
Manual. No- 5 Outfit 

No* 7* Larger Micro- Chemistry Set 



15 



/ 



25 





Learn about 



MAGNETIC FUN & FACTS 

This is the age of Electricity! Here's an instructive 
outfit that teaches all about Magnetism and Static 
Electricity, Gives endless amusement. Enabl 



es 






fascinating experiments to be performed. Contains 
a powerful horseshoe magnet, bar mai 








an 



d other parts fordoing numerous stunts 



and tricks, Complete with instruction book 



5' 



Also larger outfit 10/6 



Be an Expert Handyman 

GILBERT ELECTRIC 

HAND DRILL 






Here's a powerful* speedy electric hand drill for the young handyman^ 
workshop. It save a time and labour. Ensures accurate drilling. A boon 









to the model maker. ThIcm up to I" drills. Work* off A.C. or D.C. 
house current. 110 115. 



.".' 




chuck and flex* 



or 230/250 volts. Complete with switch. 

Improved Model 







32'6 




Amazing Simple 
Home Cinema! 

PAK 0' FUN M00VY SHOW 

You'll have endless fin with this 
miniature cinema* It shows animated 
picture* in a simple manner. Works of! a 
pocket lamp battery. Contains screen, 
lighting equipment, amusing films, and 



also plain films on which you 
can draw your own cartoons. 




/ 





Marvel of the Age! 



GILBERT ELECTRIC 



EYE 



One of the most amazing discoveries of the day is the Electric Eye. It 

n 

enables you to do astonishing things, A flash of light will ring a bell. You 
can switch off the radio by waving your hand* switch off the electric light 
by lighting a match or rig up fire alarms or bells that ring at sunrise* 
Hundreds of intriguing things can be done with this simple, scientific 



Outfit. Nothing to learn. Nothing to go wrong, 

» 

Complete with instruction booklet 



25 



/ 



. 



Beth 



e 



"Life of 

the 



Party 



ff 




GILBERT Mysto-Magic CONJURING SETS 

Few things make a boy so popular as being able to do conjuring tricks. If you have a 
Gilbert Conjuring Trick Set you will be in demand at parties* These sets contain amazing,. 



mystifying tricks that are not found in any other acts* All the tricks ore easy to 



perform. 



Set No. 1, containing twelve mysterious tricks 
Larger Sets; No. 3, 10/6; No, 4, 12 6 




/ 




< 



CUT OUT and POST 





TheA.CGILBERTCo. / 109 / Kingsway / London / W.C 

Please send me the Free illustrated Catalogue of Gilbert Scientific Toys, |j 



It 
IJ 

h 



At 



so 



send 



me 



Write here 



for which I enclose Postal Order 



***"**-* *"" ' u'/uch 

for ... these goo 

""'" you want, 




Name 



Address 
M.M.2 



i 



Print Clearly in Capital Letters 



It 

!! 

fc! 
I 

I 
I 

I. 

I 
I'. 



I 







MECCANO MAGAZINE 






* m 






VII 















I 




Trade Mark 



ALL TO SCALE CLOCKWORK TOYS 




Almost every type of vehicle on the road represented: some with 
LIGHTS, Strongly constructed and fitted with powerful, long-running mechanism, 
they will run anywhere, EVEN ON THE CARPET, Each model is beautifully finished 

In a variety of colours, and packed singly In an attractive box. 



!f 



mimic GA**aa 




MI NIC Garage 

Realistic new design* fitted with sliding doors 
and electric light. Equipment Includes three 
large petrol pumps and one targe oil cabinet. 
Light oak finish with folding base. 
LENGTH 12 ins. Price 
















Ml NIC Fire Station No, 1E 

Fitted with novel mechanical device which 
releases Fire Engine, automatically lights 
warning signal and rings alarm. Supplied 
complete with battery., 
HEIGHT 12* Ins. Price 12/6 

Can also be obtained without warning 

nal f etc Price 5/1 1 



■ 



MINIC Light Tank 

LENGTH "3J Ins. 
Price 1/6 



Realistic design, 
pumps, one large 

face and other 



**.?. 5 SERVICE StATini* 

MINIC Service Station No, 3 

Imitation red tiled roof with sign, three 
oil cabinet, two electric lights and battery, 
» LENGTH 16 ins. 

CARS NOT INCLUDED. 






;e petrol 
dummy clock 
Price 9/1 1 






MINIC Ford Royal 

Mail Van 







MINIC &*l MU ft SEMHCA 

LENGTH 5J ins. 
With Electric Light and Battery 

Without Electric Light 2/6 




LENGTH 3 
Price 6 



r 






MINIC VA0XKAU TOWN COUPS 

LENGTH SJIns. Price 1/3 




MIMIC WUXHAU, TOUBtft 



LENGTH 5 ins. Price 1/3 







3/6 





■ 



MINIC MIHLCR tcuAta 

LENGTH SJ ins. Price 2/- 



MINIC Searchlight Lorry 

with Electric Searchlight and Battery. 
LENGTH Si ins. Price 3/6 



MINIC Mechanical Horse 
and Fuel Oil Trailer 




MINIC Steam Roller 



LENGTH 7 Ins. 



Price 2/< 



LENGTH 5±ln 3 , 



Price 2/ 




MINIC Dust Cart 



LENGTH 5 J ins. 



Price 2/ 












MINIC Tip Lorry 

Price 1/3 
LENGTH 5i ins. 



Double Deck Bus 



Price 5/ 



MINIC 

LENGTH 7* ins. 



OVER FORTY MODELS FROM 



WHICH 



TO 



CHOOSE— SOME 



WITH ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 



MINIC Fire Engine 

Electric Headlamps and Battery. 

LENGTH 6fcins. Price 6/6 



OBTAINABLE AT ALL GOOD TOY SHOPS AND STORES. 








MINIC Breakdown Lorry 

with Mechanical Crane. 






» 




LENGTH 5 1 Ins. 



Pri 



3/6 







Our Xmas Advertising Campaign starts shortly. LINK UP WITH A SPECIAL DISPLAY 



LINES BROS. LTD., TRI-ANC WORKS, MORDEN ROAD, LONDON, S.W.19 




TRI-ANG 




l-ANG 



9 I * 



via 





* - 



PERFECT 






SCALE M 



• > 



ELS 





OVER 250 

VARIETIES 



. Toys is one of the most fascinating of all hobbies. These realistic miniatures are unique in their rich colouring and perfection of design and 
finish, and their range is so wide as to appeal to all tastes. 

This year in addition to reducing the prices of many of the existing models and sets, we have introduced several new items, including wonderful scale models of 



military Tanks and Aeroplanes, latest types of Motor Cars, complete with driver and passenger, and many others. 



Every 



or gin who 
complete sets. 



not already done 



should start 



delightful collecting 



mo 



can 



purchased either 

■ 



ROYAL TANK CORPS PERSONNEL 



ROYAL TANK CORPS LIGHT TANK SET 



MOTOR CARS 

WITH DRIVERS, PASSENGERS, ETC 






-I" 



152c 



3&D 



36 p 



4 



150c 



150a 



ISO e 



Dinky Toys No. 150 



150a Officer 

150b Private in sitting 

position (2) 

150c Private in standing 

position (2) 

» ■ 



■ ■ 



150e N.C.O. 






«*# 



Price of complete set 



■ 50b 



each 3d. 



3d. 



3d. 

3d. 









Dinky Toys Nos. 150b, 150c, 150d and 150e can 
each be purchased in boxes containing one 
dozen at the special price of 2'9 per box. 



»■■ 



i 






152 a 



I50d 



152 b 



Dinky Toys No. 152 



152a Light Tank 

25 h.p.J 



tons, 



*•# 



each 






No, 152b Reconnaissance Car 

No. 152c Austin 



/# 



Driver 



*•» 



3d. 



Price 



complete set 2'9 



AUSTIN SEVEN CAR 

Dmky Toys No. 35d 

the same as No. 152c, illus- 
trated above, except that it is finished in a 
range of different colours. Price 4d. each. 



ROYAL TANK CORPS MEDIUM TANK SET 



,.-■ 



7.1 



f4 









. -i. 



l*g 



36e 






■ 



3« A 






36 S 



«<• 



Dinky Toy* No. 36 



FiMed with detachable rubber tyres. 



Silvez-piaied radiarors* 



4T# 






# *♦ 



with drive j and tool man 
36b Bant ley (Two-wale* Sports Coupe) 

with driver and passenger ... 
Number (Vogue Saloon) with 

drive j and footman ... 
36d Rover (Streamline Saloon) with 

driver and passenger.., ,„ 
British Safmson (Two-seater 

Sports) wirh driver 
British Salrnson (Four-seater 



each 



* ■ « 



*« » 



*#■ 



Sports) with driver 

Price of complete set 5/6 



RAILWAY SIGNALS 



i 



lid, 
lid. 

lid. 
lid. 
1 1 d. 

■ 

lid. 



No. 151a Medium Tank (12 tons. 



Dinky Toys No. 151 



lf« 



1'6 



No. 151b Three»ton Transport 



Wagon 



##« 



I * fr 



151c Cooker Trailer with 



jack stand 






lit 



No. 151d Water Tank Trailer 
No. 150d Driver 






•*• 



each 7d. 

5d. 
3d. 



RAF. AEROPLANES 



Price of complete set 3'9 



■ _ * 



60N 



"St - 









Dinky Toys No 



## • 



60h "Singapore" Flying Soal 
60n Fairey 'Baitle" Bomber (2),., 

60p Gloiter "Gladiator" Biplane (2) 

Price of complete set 



-i * 



. + * 






60H 






each 1/. 

4id. 

6d 



** 



EMPIRE FLYING BOATS 



Dinky Toys No. 60r 






Scale models of the latest Imperial Airways Flying 



Boats. Six models available named: "Caledonia/* 

n "Corsair/ 1 "Challenger." 
1 'Centurion 11 and "Cambria* 9 * Price 1/- each 



"Cdnopus, 



ATLANTIC 



BOAT 



Dinky Toys No. 60x 
Similar in type to the Empire Flying Boat. Assorted 

colours, Prte© 1/- each. 



- I" 



15b 



Dinky Toys No. 15 

Single Aim Signals I "Home" and "Distant") 

Double Arm Signals (2) 

Signals ("Home" and "Distant") 
Price of complete set 1/6 

ROYAL AIR MAIL SERVICE CAR 
Dinky Toys No. 34a 

tn correct colours and 

fitted with detachable 



each 









>UM 



lyres. 
Price 6d, each 



Ask your dealer 
show you the com- 
plete range of Dmky 

Toys. 



TRACTOR 



I 






'*_ •*_ 



I 












■ -■-. 



■.-. 
v. 



* ^ 



GARAGE 



■ :■ _■ i 



i. 



v, 



- 



. 



, \. 



at 



■■ ■■ "i 



- .'1 * 



/ 



w ■■ 



Wr 



*&r 



V. 



V. 



■ 1 



.■«■-.■ 



, .'.' , 



-■■■ 



m"."i 



■ "i 1 



.' " 



■■.", 



". . , 



J. 



■■■■■•■ 



•."-' 



E FIRE ENGINE 



4 






\> — 



POLICE 
MOTOR CYCLIST 

Dinky Toys No. 37b 



CIVILIAN 
MOTOR CYCLIST 

Dink/ Toys No. 37a 



/ - 



Dinky Toys No, 22e 
Price 9d. each 



TRAM CAR 



iiia^ 



Dinky Toys No. 45 
Fitted with 
Will accommodate 
Motor Cars. 



doubl 



- 



any two 
Price 1/3 



Dink 



DWcy Toys No. 25 k 

Finished in red. 

Fitted with six firemen* bell, fadder 
and detachable rubber tyres. Price 1 /- 



<w. 



. .L 



Price 6d. 



Assorted colours. 

Price fid. Mch 






Dinky Toys No. 27 

Assorted colours. 
Price 3d. each 



LIMITED 



BINNS 



ROAD 



LIVERPOOL 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



IX 





FASCINATING 



COLLECTING HOBBY 







FINISHED IN 
RICH COLOURS 




PETROL STATION 



FILLING AND 
SERVICE STATION 





Dinky Joys No. 48 

Accurate reproduction of a tilling station 

Price 1/3 each 



PAVEMENT SET 







The contents of 
12 in. strips of 



corners* 



Dinky Toys No. 46 

this set are four 3 *n„ six 6 in. and 
pavement and foul quarter disc 

Price of complete set 



POSTAL SET 



PETROL PUMPS 






.-.- 



■-■. 





JjJeKV,' % 







*«■ 



• B ■ 



»*- 



each 



Dinky Toys No. 49 
Scale models fitted with rubber hose pipes. Finished in correct 

colours. 
No. 49a Bowser Pump 

No. 49b Wayne Pump 

No. 49c Theo Pump 

No. 49d Shell Pump 

No. 49* Oil Bin (Pralte) 

Price of complete set 1/3 



* ■ ■ 



■ 



■ *# 



V ■■ 



•*« 



*■• 



■ - m 



■ P ■ 



■ .: . 



«.. 



««» 



STREAMLINE SALOON 



STREAMLINE TOURER 





Dinky Toys No. 22h 
Assorted colours. Fitted with 
detachable rubber 

Price 4d* each 






Dinky Toys No, 22g 
Assorted colours. Fitted with 

■ • 

detachable rubber tyres. 

Price 4d. each 






MOTOR VEHICLES 




30A 




30 B 




50 C 






No. 30a 

No. 30b 
No. 30c 

No. 30d 
No. 30e 
No. 30o 



30D 



Dtnky Toys No, 30. 
Fitted with detachable rubber 

Silver-plated radiators. 
Chrysler ' -Airflow 11 Saloon 

Rolls-Royce 
Daimler 

Vauxhall 

Breakdown Car 

Caravan Trailer 



•«* 



1*1 



111 



»*» 



• «* 



- » w 



*** 



*•* 









m m m 



each 6d. 

9d. 
9d. 

9d. 
Sri. 



www 



Price of complete set 3H 1 



#* 



p# 



SMALL CARS 






Toys No. 3S 
35a Saloon Car 

35c •" *~ " 



each 
M.G." Sports Car 

Price of 



Filled with rubber tyres 

No. 35b Ratsr each 3d. 









*«« 



*»* 



#** 



** 



ete sei 9tJ 







i 








■*# 



Dinky Toys No, 12 

Pillar Box, G.P.O. 

„ „ Air Mail ... 
Telephone Call Box ,„ 

Telegraph Messenoer 

Postman 



* i- + 



#* ■ 



*• ■ 



*■•* 



«*« 



Royal Mail Van 



*«* 



*** 



*«* 



Price of complete set 2/3 




each 3d* 

3d, 



■ 



MECHANICAL HORSE AND FOUR ASSORTED TRAILERS 





33C 




35F 




33 E 




33B 



MUX 






Dinky Toys No 33 
Fitted with detachable rubber tyres. 

Mechanical Horse 
Flat Truck 
Open Wagon 

Dust Wagon 
Petrol Tank 



*■• 



* >• 



**• 



p-» 



•ni 



■ -* 



i * ■ 



*.♦ 



each 






*•* 



«*• 



i ■ » 



■ » 



■ #■ 



f* 



Price of cempfele set 2/9 



j# 



OH. -COMET" 
AEROPLANE 







Dinky Toys No. 60o 

Scale model of the plane used 
by C. W. A. Scott and the fate 
I. C Black in their Australian 



flight. 



Price Bd. each 



MOTOR TRUCK 







Dinky Toys No. 22c 

Assorted colours fitted with 

detachable rubber 



Price Sd. each 



lyres 



BOX VAN 




33D 



Dinky Toys No, 33d 

Fitted with detachable tyres. 

8l1 each 



AMBULANCE 




Dinky Toys No, 30f 
Fitted with detachable rubber 

tyres. Finished in 0fey, with 

red cross. Silver-plated 
or. Price 6d. ^ach 



BEACON 




STREAMLINE BUS 




ROBOT TRAFFIC 
SIGNAL 



Dinky Toys No. 29b 

Fitted with rubber tyres. 

Price 6d. each 

MOTOR BUS 



Realistic 

Belisha 

Price 



No, 47d 
model of the 
ly Beacon 

Id. each 




Dinky Toys No. 29a 

Assorted colours. 
Price 4d. each 



FAMOUS LINERS 





i 




Dinky Toys No. 5T 



"Europa" 

" Rex" 

"Empress ol Britain" 

"Strathaird" 




Dinky Toys No. 47a 

(Four face) 

Price 3d. each 

No. 47b | Three face) 

Price 3d. each 

No; 47c (Two face) 

Rloht-angt© or beck-to- 

Pric# 34. each 




SIC 








«*« 



each Sd. 

u 6d. 
6d. 






■ ri* 



*** 



* »i 



mw% 



Queen of Bermuda" 

'Britannic 11 

Price of complete set 2/1 1 



*■* 






»» * 



144 



MECCANO LIMITED 



BINNS 



ROAD 



LIVERPOOL 






X 




MECCANO MAGAZINE 



r. 




\ 



™— 



_ 



i 



^i 






*■ 



\ 



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■ ■. 



' ■ 



j 



f. *— 



.■ 



i 















.■.■ 



-. -■ 



, 



■■■ , 



FOR BOYS 



GIRLS 



Dinky Builder Outfits are great favourites with boys and girls. The 
parts contained in them provide a most fascinating constructional hobby, 

specially designed for the younger children. These brightly coloured 
parts are fitted together in a most simple and Ingenious manner without 
the use of any nuts and bolts. 

There are four Outfits in the series, Nos. 0, 1, 2 and 3. In all of 
which the parts are beautifully enamelled In striking colours, giving a 
distinction to the models that Is outstandingly attractive, 



No. 



DINKY BUILDER OUTFIT 



■v 



This is an excellent Outfit with which a splendid range of models can 
be built. The Instruction Folder included gives examples of 40 delightful 
models* Price 

DINKY BUILDER OUTFIT 

This fine Outfit contains a varied selection of parts, 
including a set of four road wheels for constructing 
miniature wheeled toys, many examples of which are 
illustrated In the Instruction Manual. These Instruc- 



tions show a total of 
or girl can build. 



models that 



any 
Price 4/11 




o. 2 DINKY BUILDER OUTFIT 

The No. 2 Dinky Builder Outfit contains a compre- 
hensive selection of parts with which all the No. O 
and No* 1 Outfits models can be hulk. In addition, 
the parts In this fine Outfit make possible the con- 

struction of six groups of miniature model furniture. 

Full Instructions arc given In the Instruction Manual 
Included in the Outfit. Price 7/9 

DINKY BUILDER 

The Dinky Builder "A" packet contains a useful 
assortment of Dinky Builder Parts with which Outfits 
No, O, No* 1, No. 2 and No. 3 may be supplemented. 

Price 1/- 



■ 






4 



i 



r 



( 



> 



i 



\ 



MWEWO 



No. 2 




Outfit 




Garage 






No. 3 DINKY BUILDER OUTFIT 

This is the largest Outfit in the series, 
and Its model-building possibilities are 
almost limitless. It Is the ideal gift for 
young boys and girls. 

The parts contained in this Outfit ran 
be used over and over again to make 
hundreds of different models, including 

of ail 







Towers. Bridges. Buildings of all types 

e. Aeroplanes, etc. Complete 
instructions are provided. Price 10/9 



Furnitu 



Manufactured 




Meccano 



Binns 





THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 






XI 




A game for two, based upon the characters 
in R. L Stevenson's famous book "Treasure 
sland.** Scouting, 



bluff 



and 



tactics 



are 



necessary to capture the opponent's treasure. 
Stockades, powder chests and prisons play 



an 





in the game. 



EVERY BOY AND GIRL WILL WANT IT 
AT CHRISTMAS. 

■ _ 

A de luxe production selling at 3/6 



• 



OBTAINABLE FROM STATIONERS 



STORES 



AND 



GAMES DEALERS 



or POST FREE in Great Britain from 



■ 



THOMAS DE LA RUE & CO. LTD., 110, BUNHILL ROW, LONDON, E.C.1 



Charming Bird and 



Anim 





from 



Nature* $ Own Materials 



I 



i 



Owls .♦. penguins ...camels 
*♦. I ion s-a nd man/ other 

■ 

curious creatures are easily 

made from woodland ma- 
terials with a NATURE- 
CRAFT OUTFIT. Each set 

• i si 

contains selected 




ials, tools, sable brush, 

colours, glue, and all nec- 
essary accessories. Send 
to-day and enjoy many 

happy hours with this 
fascinating new pastime. 

PRICE 

(Post free 5 r 3 
C.O.D.4d.ex.) 








NATURECRAFT HANDBOOK complete with colour frontis- 
piece, and detailed instructions for making over 



fifty original models. 



PRICE 
[Post free VI) 






Obtainable from all the leading Stares, Art and Craft, and 
Fancy Qoods Dealers, if any difficulty order direct from 



NATURECRAFT STUDIO 

LOATES LANE, WATFORD, HERTS. 

Trade Enquiries invited* [Agents required for certain territories) 




REARUQHT 



HEADLAMP 



Wise wheelers fit lamps that 
never fail Abrilliant headlight 



w 




100ft. beam an 




red 



rear light, automatically gener 




ated as you ride. Safer I More 
sensible! And a Pifco Lighting 
Set saves money. No batteries* 
Extremely light, silent, 



PIFCO 



14 



Service" 




Dynamo Set: 

6- volt dynamo, head-* 

lamp* red rear lamp, 
all chromium-plated. 



fitted, weatherproof and guar- 
anteed. Costs nothing to run. 




From alt Cycle Shops. 







DYNAMO LIQHTI 




SET 




{Foreign) 



Write for Free Catalogue of Britain's Best 
Electric Cycle Lamps, (Prices from I'll.) 



PIFCO LTD., WATLING STREET, MANCHESTER 



London Office: 58, City Road, E.C.I. 



■ ■» 



. - ■ 




+ « 



Xll 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 




« 




■' 



1 



THE 




MAGAZINE 



« * * 

xui 






— — 







Mark 



b 



> 




has enabled 

produce a 

a price within 



THE 



RAIDER- 



wing 



■ 




13i 



// 



It is built on the lines of the latest R.A.F. 

bombers and will fly up to 200 feet under 



Complete with patent high s 
and packed in specially constr 




* I 

winder 







box 




/ 



11 









conditions. 



The 




fuselage 




3 







W 




Without high speed winder— 



in carton 







/ 



11 




the 



wings and spring undercarriage 

almost unbreakable. 





A similar, but smaller model named the AVENGER 

is obtainable at only a shillin 



f 



fT 



1 



AVENGER 



? 



THE 



Complete with 
and packed in s 







wing span 11" 



high speed winder 







constructed box 




/ 



11 







MODEL 




Without high speed winder — in carton 



1 



/ 



FROG model aircraft arc covered by world Patents granted and 
pending. Made in England by International Model Aircraft Ltd. 

Sole Concessionaires : 



OBTAINABLE AT ALL GOOD TOYSHOPS 




STORES 



LINES BROS 




TRI-ANG WORKS 



MORDEN RdI, merton, LONDON, S.W.19 




This illustration shows how easily 
these models can be 



ttif 




flight with the patent 

winder. 




up 





COUPON 



To Lines Bros. Ltd. (Dept 5)* 
Morden Road* London, 5. w. 19 

Please send me your " Frog " coloured leaflet with par::culatf 
of the " Frog " Flying Club and how to obtain handsome 
enamelled FROG Pilot Badges, 



Name 






Address*.. 



*#*■■■ 



. ******* mm ************ ,,.....*«*«*■■•■■»■««■**«« «***«».-*« 









Please write in block letters 




XIV 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



1 


































Every boy should know how aeroplanes are designed and 
constructed, and should be able to recognise the different types 
of machines at a glance. These fine Constructor Outfits contain a 
range of aeroplane parts by means of which boys are able to design 
and build their own Aeroplanes quite easily. 



Price List o 



f A 




plane 




u 



tfits 



No. OO Outfit 
No, O Outfit 



Standard Serins 

3' 3 

4'6 



No. 1 Outlit 
No. 2 Outfit 



fit 



7'6 
I2'6 



Special Series 



No. 1 Special Outfit 



12'6 



I 




2 




Outfit 



**# 



21 



Sole. Tin* parts m the Nfft, OO ami .Y.r. O Outfits nra n>4 intended mr 

use with (he larger Outfits, 



I 



I 









1 




■ 






















Now is the time to get a Meccano Motor Car Outfit. You will never 
grow tired of building and running the superb models that you will 
be able to build. Your days will be full of fun and thrills! 

Perfect miniature reproductions of many different lypesof car can 
be built with these splendid Outfits, and a powerful clockwork motor, 
that gives the models a long run on one winding, is included in 
each Outfit- 



Prices of Motor Car Outfits 



No. 1 Outfit 



8'6 



I 



No. 2 Outfit 



#4* 



17'6 



1 







* 



* 



M 






ANO LIMITED 



* 



BINNS 





AD, 



LIV 




RP 




OL 






I 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



XV 



MODELS 






FURNITURE 

CLOCKS 

TRAYS 

TOYS 

GALLEONS 



■ 



f 









work cut in wood for exhibition or 

as suitable gifts. Complete full si 

charts, instructions and all mater- 



SAWS 






supplie 



made with 



Hobbies. Easily 
fretwork tools* 



i 



A fascinating pastime for 
^vho likes to use real tools* Simple 
inexpensive and interesting. Write 
for free list of models to make, etc* 






H 



. 



;, 



i 



*y 



r 



■ i 



■ 






r^. 



DES 

WHEELS 

FITTINGS 



DOLLS 



PAPER 



*■ 



in the 1938 Handbook are 284 pages of inter- 
articles with special chapteis on 
making galleons, and a large 2/** design chart 
for a model Country Inn free. No other book 
like it. A thousand things to make and 
Only 6d. from any newsagent or sent post 

for 9d. from Dereham. Free illustrated 
leaflets on request. 

GET THE HOBBIES 
1938 HANDBOOK 

Tools, materials, etc., from leading ironmongers, 
or Hobbies own branches in London. Glasgow* etc.. 
or by post: Hobbies Ltd. (Dept. 96). 
Norfolk. 



. t 







o lVaui; 



M ( l*t 






m 



ary itself is 
as sfim as a fi 

watch 
softP 



guinea 



ound in a 



ersian 



alphabetically 



slight weight 












* 



i 



\ 



» 



% 









i 



v*. 



1 



w 



/ 



Indexed by 



extreme 



? 



diness 



t 






Price 



pencil) 






MODEL 



POCKET DIARY 



1938 



Percival Marshall, A.M.I.C.E., has 



mse 



specially compiled 



rmation 



gives 



detai 



ement, 

museums 



■ 



pac 



ere models are 



clu 



and tables 



bs, flyi 



e seen, an 



grounds, etc., with pages of useful figures 



mo 



Sold by 

W, H. SMITH & SON LTD. 

BOOTS (Chemists) 

ALL LEADING LONDON STORES 

EVERY PROGRESSIVE STATIONER 

BASSETT-LOWKE & CO. LTD. 



BONDS 



EUSTON ROAD 



PRINCIPAL MODEL MAKERS' SUPPLIERS 



ALSO 


— NEW 


THIS 


YEAR- 


•Tha above 1 


diary 


with a 


special 


cricket 


supplement 1 


—All 


about 


the Au: 


titrations — and 


lllus- 


- 




Irate d 


fully. 



















- 



Rue 

MODEL 



OCCUPATIONAL 

ENGINEERS 



supplement 



I 



XVi 















' 



■ 1 






AIRFLOW 

A really luxurious model. CHAIN AND CRANK 
drive, TUBULAR CHASSIS, opening door, adjust* 

windscreen, rubular bumpers* facsimile 




Airflow radiator, sunken ELECTRIC headlamps, tangent spoke 
jointless sponge rubber tyres. CHROMIUM-PLATED hubs 
stop and go sign, also buzzer horn, Length 45 in. 



wheels, lQin.xl*in. 
rims. ELECTRIC 







Price 110/- 





I 




TRI-ANG PREMIER 

Super Children's Car. Alf-steef body. Latest typo Vauxhaft radiator, lamps and bumpers. 

S in. balloon disc wheels, ft in. rubber tyres, BALL-BEARING BACK AXLE. Windscreen 
and direction indicator. Dummy hood. All bright parts CHROMIUM-PLATED. Lengih 39 in. 

Price 45/- 



TRI-ANG 



TRI-ANG JUNIOR' 



TRI-ANG JUNIOR 






Realistic Sports Car, All-steel body, opening side door, plated 
streamline radiator, two dummv ride lamps, B in. balloon disc 
wheels, J in. rubber tyres. Equipment includes petrol and oil cans. 

Length 34 in. 

Price 29/6 



ASK YOUR 
DEALER 




FOR 

FINE NEW 
COLOURED 

LEAFLET 








i 



TRI 



ANG TRICYCLE 

(alb* r*j*&t hadh) 



N?5 



TRI-ANG TRICYCLE No. 5 (Regd. Trade Mark) 

NOW FITTED WITH BALL-BEARINGS THROUGHOUT AND ROLLER BRAKE 
Cycle chain drive with free-wheel. Frame best quality weldless cycle tubing. 14 in 
wheels. 1^ in. joinfless sponge-rubber tyres. Improved handlebars. Rim brake. Coil- 
spring saddle, CHROMIUM-PLATED FITTINGS. Black, blue or maroon. 



Price 63/- 



>; 



TRt-ANG "FAIRYCYCLE" (Regd.) MODEL No. 2 

Tubular frame. 14 in. wheels. 1£in. grey imitation pneumatic tyres. Ball-bearing pedals. 
Rim brake. Twocoit saddle. Chain cover. Stand. CHROMIUM-PLATED FITTINGS. 




blue or maroon 



Price 42/- 



DEALERS! 

Our Xmas Advertising Campaign starts shortly. 




* 



Link 



up with a special display of Tri-Ang Toys 



TRI-ANG ''UNITY" JUVENILE CYCLE No. 1 6PB 

Frame of best quality weldless steef tubing. Adjustable ball bearings throughout. 16 in. x If in. 
Dunlop pneumatic tyres on rustless tangent spoke wheels, Two rim brakes. Raised handlebars, 

i in. xfk cycle roller chain. Three-coii saddle. CHROMIUM-PLATED FITTINGS Black or blue. 

Price 63/- 





• 




/ 






* 




W. 








MONTH: SPECIALLY ENLARGED CHRISTMAS ISSUE. PUBLISHING DATE: 1st DECEMBER 



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p--f— -4 H 



















Editorial Office: 

Binns Road, Liverpool 13 



England 




Vol. XXII. No. 11 

November, 1937 






kiiaa 



» 111 1 ■'11 i"*aii ■ 1* ■ 1 r ■•■•' ■ 
ijiiii 11 1 ■ 1 4> a .baa* a 1 1 a 44 a 




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-i -f- p-H— +»■- 











azine 







rans 









k flood of letters of congratulation 




OWt 






last month of the twenty-first birthday 
issue of the "MM." I think I have never before read so 
many interesting letters in so short a time; and although 

by its 




knew how 



gre 




the Mag< 





treas 




readers, I was surprised to find how many of them were 
able to tell me that they have in their possession every 
copy from the first issue. In most cases these are carefully 
bound and the volumes are in constant use for reference. 

- -■ 1 1 ■■ 

I was specially interested to note that Mr. Stewart 
Wilson, of Morden, Surrey, has all the issues and has 



every volume bound. Mr. Wilxm was for many years 



leader of the Holy Trinity 




Chib, Barnsbury, 



London, N.l t which has the honour of being the first Club 
in the world to be affiliated with the Meccano Guild. 

■ • 

Incidentally, Mr. Wilson tells me that among his greatest 
treasures is one of the earliest Meccano outfits, which 

# 





name "Mechanics Made 



1901. 




too, have a 





of the 




parts produced during those early days, and it is extra- 
ordinarily interesting to compare them with the present 

Meccano 

Another reader, Mr. J. E. Brown, of Frampton, near 

that only one reader 
has written saying that he has all the 'M.M.s' since the 
first number, I should like to say that my late younger 

son John took them from the first number, and since he 



Dorchester^ writes: "As you 




died 



in 




mst 1935, I have 




taking them. 




have to cycle six miles to Dorchester to get them." Other 
letters, many of them from readers who 




never 





to me before, tell similar stories of con tin 
interest in. the Magazine. It has been a great pleasure to 
answer personally these welcome communications. 



Chimney or Funnel? 



I 





the old argument has arisen 

w net her a steam locomotive has a " 





to 






a 



"funnel." My own impression is that the term "chimney" 

is correct, but apparently the 






sim 




e as that. At Sw 




on 




so 



term 




appears to be in use, to some extent at any rate; 



whereas at Doncaster, where 



gadget known 



*« 




name 



* * 




nel 



»» 





chimney lifter," 




to have a 

use of the 




cause surprise 



in a case of this kind, the dictionaries do not 
help much. One I have before me describes a chimney as 

t of smoke or heated air from 

furnaces." This is alright, but when I turn to the word 



a passage for the 




i 









i i 



funnel" in the same dictionary I find that it means "a 

._!_ _ _ f aL J* _1 _i_ #1 L* t^ 



tube or 








the 




of smoke, etc.," which 

j* a* 



seems to lead in precisely the same direction. I have never 
heard anyone speak of a ship's "chimney," nor of a factory 
"funnel"; hut there appears to be no reason why these 
names should not be so used. It seems to be a matter of 









usage, and I should like to know what my readers think 
about it. Possibly some of them may dodge the difficulty 
by suggesting the use of the name "smoke stack," which 

connection 






believe is used in the United 
with locomotives. 



A Mystery of Mount Everest 



When the first attempts were made to climb Mount 
merest, stories were told by the Tibetans of dreadful 

aa/ 

creatures, half man and half ape, that prowled about the 




ower slopes of the mountain. The Tibetans called them 

"the abominable snowmen," and asserted that they were 

ing large animals like the yak with a blow 

mere 




e of ki 





At 





creatines 






legend, but the members of successive expeditions have 
been surprised to find mysterious footprints at a height 
of 20,000 ft. These have now been photographed and 

I ^b— J _L 



me as 





w 






w 








and must have been made by some entirely 

If 

a bear that is much larger 




unknown animal, 

than the grizzly of North jAmerica 

lere is no reason why Everest should not 





a 



secret of this kind, for there are many parts of the world 

where mysterious creatures may lurk. There have even 



giant dinosaurs in the forests and 



been runiours 






swamps of 








and tales of other survivals of 



a 




t ages have reached us from the unexplored jungles of 
South America. No doubt it was stories of this kind that 

■ . 

inspired Conan Doyle's famous book "The Lost World," 
which tells of dinosaurs and pterodactyls living on a great 

JaL , mr 1|_J 1_J 

plateau isolated from the rest of the world by its precipi- 
tous sides. There are similar plateaux on a smaller scate 

1 

in the Grand Canyon of the Colorado. As described on 




60S, these are now 




ex plored. 






Our Special Christmas Issue 

■ 

The Christmas issue of the "A/.il/," will be published 
on 1st December. As usual it will be specially enlarged, 




will be full of interesting articles and other features, 

but there will be no increase in price. This issue is sure to 
be 

make sure of his copy by placing an order now with his 




^BBf 

out very early. Every reader therefore should 

-•*■-■ -m 4)* -a. ■ a -m —. i 





dealer or newsagent, and 
all his friends to follow his example. 



should also 




637 



638 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



aDDnnDDnnDnDaDnnaanaanaDnDnDDDDannDnnnnnnnDnannnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn 



□ 
□ 
□ 








a 

D 
□ 

□ 







In 




ots of 




than 



200 Tons 



□ 

□ 

D 

□ 
□ 

□ 
□ 
□ 

D 
□ 



nDnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnDnnnnnnnnnnnnnnncEnnnnnnnnDcxinnnnD 



THE melting department at the Vickers Works of the 



f 



X English 




Corporation Limited has facilities for 



making ingots over 200 tons in weight. These ingots are 
used for the production of the huge forgings required for 
chemical and oil engineering processes, super power 
stations, and marine, electrical and general engineering 
work, and our cover shows the tapping of a 60-ton acid 
open hearth furnace in readiness for casting one of them. 

is seen running down the launder, or 





The molten s 

trough, from the furnace to the ladle, which is lined with 
firebrick and is suspended from a 200-ton crane. From the 

the steel is poured into the ingot mould. It runs 
through a small nozzle 
in the bottom of the 
ladle, and pouring is 
controlled by means of 
a 



1 ■""• i * 

bricks they contain or choke the passages through them, 
a combination of circumstances that would shorten 

considerably the life of the furnace. 

thousands of bricks, which 





regenerators 

are arranged to form a checker work exposing a large area 
of surface, and containing many zig-zag passages through 



which the gases must pass on their way to and from the 





By 



a suitable arrangement of valves 



and flues, the producer gas used as fuel and air are convey 
ed to entrances at the bottoms of their respective 





casting ingots of 



exceptional weight, say 
over 150 tons, it 



is 








to use 
steel from three or more 
60-ton open-hearth 

furnaces. In this case, 

the first 




furnace, 




ladle 



is 



placed over the ingot 



mould, 




is below 



ground level, and the 

is allowed to flow 




in. In the meantime a 
second ladle filled with 

from another fur- 
brought above 




nace is 





ing 



chambers at one end of the furnace. They pass through 
the hot checker brickwork, where they are pre-heated, 

and through the up- 

to enter the melt- 

chamber through 

separate ports at one 
end. The gas and air 

mix in the furnace and 
burn. The flame passes 
across the hearth, and 

ucts of com- 



the 

bust ion make their exit 










through the gas and air 

at the other end 




so 



into 



the re- 



generators there, heat 
ing the checker 
work before 




passing 



out 



finally 
to the 



the first. The steel from 
the second ladle is then 
poured into the first, 
and the third ladle is dealt with in a similar manner. This 



■ 

An ingot weighing 136 tons being withdrawn from 

English Steel Corporation Limited for 



a reheating furnace. We are indebted to the 

the illustrations to this article* 



chimney. The direction 
of the gas and air is 
reversed at frequent in- 
tervals with the object 
of obtaining suitable 
checker temperatures. 
Pre-heating the gas 
air on these lines 







_ 



method of pouring ensures a steady flow of steel from the 
first ladle into the ingot mould, which is rotated slowly 

the casting, thus giving complete control over 




conditions. 



The melting chamber of an acid open-hearth furnace is 
rectangular in shape and is built of silica bricks, which are 
highly refractory. It is supported on steel girders, bound 
by steel plates and other members, held in 
tie-rods, and the hearth or 






is made is com 




of 



upon 




sand, 



which the steel 

■ 

is fused to 




give a homogeneous bottom. 

Below the melting chamber, and connected to it by 
separate up-takes, are four chambers known as re- 
generators, two at each end of the furnace. The two inner 
ones are larger than the others, and are air regenerators; 
the two outer smaller ones are gas regenerators. There 
are also slag chambers, or pockets, vertically below the 



passages from the furnace, in which finely-divided 
materials mechanically carried over by the stream of gas 
from the furnace are collected. These materials otherwise 
would pass into the regenerators, and react with the 



allows for a more effective heat in the furnace than would 
be the case if combustion of air and gas were to take place 
in what is generally understood to be the normal manner. 
The reversal of the gas and air at intervals has a cumu- 
lative effect, giving higher and higher temperatures in the 
furnace, and eventually it would be possible to melt the 
furnace itself. The temperature is controlled by the m 
who judges it by the appearance of the furnace, the flame 





the condition 




his 




samples taken at frequent intervals. 



which is indicated by 





r gas generally used as fuel in acid-hearth 






furnaces consists chiefly of nitrogen, 

and hydrogen, with a smaller proportion 

carbons. The nitrogen is a non-com bust ible and therefore 
of no value. The gas is made in circular producers of steel 
plate lined with fire brick. A current of air con' 
steam is led in at the bottom, and coal is fed from the top 
automatically. The gas evolved is led off through flues to 
the valves leading to the furnace. 

The term "acid" hearth demands a little explanation. 
The element silicon combines with oxygen to give silicon 
oxide, which is known as silica. This is familiar in the form 



* 



. 




4 






THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



639 








of silica sand. Ganister and silica bricks are also very 
gely made up of silica. Silica is classed by the chemist 

furnace is known as an acid 




as an 




oxide, 





furnace because the hearth of the melting chamber is 



lined with silica sand. In the same 
magnesia and lime 

are known as 

oxides, 



way 




oxides of 



furnace are decided 
be produced. In 





quality of the steel to 

e of furnace, 








so 



t h at 



when the hearth is 
lined with these 

oxides, the process 
is known as the 
basic open-hearth 
process. 

In order to start 
a furnace from the 



of this 
sulphur and phosphorus are not removed, and it is 
therefore essential that the percentage of these elements 
in the raw materials shall be very low in order to pro- 
duce a good quality 

acid steel. 
The 

materials used are 
pig iron and scrap, 

of 



I 
4 



cold, a coal fire is 
placed on the 

hearth 



and 



the 




to admit 




and 



gas 



The fire 



plays the same part 

applied 




as a 



to the mixture of 





a s e 




_■ 



t 



the 

the former rangin 

from 35 to 60 per 

to 




cent., according 
circumstances. 
These form 
the charge for car- 



bon 
electric 



steels. 



An 



overhead 



furnace charger is 
used for feeding in 




the raw ma 
When the charge 
has been thorough- 
iron ore 





from an ordinary 

Bunsen burner. It is required only until the temperature 
of the melting chamber and regenerators is high enough 
to raise the gas and air to a temperature at which they 



of the boxes in which the castings are made. 



air and gas issuing In the foundry casting bay. Molten steel is pouring through a small nozzle in the bottom of tbe ladle into one and Small limestone 

additions are 
demand, their purpose being 

give 

these 



will 



ignite 



spontaneously. Special 



are 




necessary when warming up a 

gas for the first time, as there is danger of explosion. 



precautions 
and introducing 



When the 




chamber is new, a bricklaver 



leaves the hearth outlined in silica brick. The coal 

fire is put in the furnace in order to dry it, and when 

this 



process is complete, gas is admitted and the tem- 




made as 

to remove carbon, silicon and manganese, 






the required degree of refining. The finishings 
steels, which are added during the final 



gene 
ganese, or ferro-silicon and ferro-manganese 












of the 

consist of alloys of silicon and man- 



For alloy 




similar proportions of pig iron are 



used. The scrap is very often alloy steel, however, 
and further additions of alloys are required. In the 




of a nickel-chrome 







um 




ure 



raise 










cau- 



or 




ferro-silicon 



-man 




is 



tiously for a few days 
When the newly-lined 




is hot enough, 
dry silica sand is glazed 
or fritted on to the 

hearth in 



successive 



thin layers. This opera 














as 



a 




ss great care, 

hearth 
means time lost be- 
tween charges, or some- 



times 



com 





e 



leading 



the 

of the hearth, 
to the loss of 
the charge and damage 
to the structure. 

hearth is shaped 




i 



so 



that 



from 



direction it slopes 




wards 



the 



tap 




When it is completed, 

M 

which takes from five 
to seven days, the tap 





added, as in makin 
carbon steels, but raw 
nickel, ferro-molyb- 



denum 



and 



ferro- 






chromium are added at 
stages during the work- 
ing in order to bring 

the steel to the analysis 

specified. 

At frequent intervals, 
small samples are taken 
from which the con- 
dition of the 

determined. Some 




is 
of 



the samples are drilled 

and the 







deter- 

mine the quantities of 

alloys to be 




ing 



added. The furnace is 
ready for tapping when 



A hot bar passing through ihe ttnishing rolls of a 28 in. rolling mill. The dial shows the distance 

through which the top roll rises and falls, the bottom roll being fixed. 



the 



bath 



has 



been 



hole 



is cut 




closed with a mixture of crushed coke 



and sand, backed with clay or ganister. Before charging 

acid charges is 
melts and sinks 



on a 




hearth, slag from 
crushed and spread over it 



into the hearth, 

rb iron. 
its first charge 







it more dense and less liable 
furnace is now ready to 




The raw materials used in an acid open- 




tion requ 




and the steel to 





in gots 



up to over 






to the condi- 
required analysis. 
weidit from 1 ton 



say up 






smaller sizes 



f 



to 35 or 40 cwt. } are taken to the Rolling Mill. 

er ones are used for forgings, the medium ones 



The 

being: hammered and the 




f-* 






ed under a 







s. 



For the information in this article we are indebted to 



the 



English 





oration Ltd. 



640 



THE 




MAGAZINE 



* 





MERICAN engineers have carried out some of the 



world's greatest feats of constructional engineering, 
but a colossal dam that they are now building across the 
Columbia River in the State of Washington will dwarf all 
their previous enterprises. This is known as the Grand 

Dam, and the illustration in the heading on this 
page shows what it will look like. It will be three times 
the size of the Great Pyramid of Egypt, and indeed will 



arm 32 miles long will be formed on the Spokane River 

which flows into the. Cnlnmbin 



► 








the 

The 




> 



est structure of any kind ever made by Man. 



Grand 



- 

The colossal nature of the enterprise is shown by the 

1 1 I I X "11* I % H * « ft 4 BMK. 



fact that 

inspection, 

purposes will have a total length 




to be built into the Dam for 



control, cooling, drainage and 




ler 




ei 



■ 








C o ulee 



Dam forms only a part 
of a great project plan- 






the 








of all 






country, 

largest 




r e rn m en t to 

water of 

Columbia Basin, 

less 
than such rivers as the 

and 

Colorado, the Columbia 
has the second largest 

the 

the 

source 

of hydro-electric power. 

the 

and the Pacific 
Ocean it falls through 
some 1,300 ft, and the 
entire 

the building of 1 dams 
to make use of 92 per 
cent, of this fall. 
The 



miles. More 
an 1,200,000 cu. ft. of water per second will be able 
to pass over its crest, a volume more than three times 
the greatest recorded flow of the river. This will pour 

over a spillway 1,650 ft. 

long in the central sec- 
tion of the Dam, and 
in addition there will be 
three sets of 20 outlets 
controlled 
Sift 










s 



by 
in width . 





The 



turbines of the power 
station to be erected at 
the foot of the Dam 
also will serve to regu- 
late the water level in 
the reservoir, for when 
working at full capacity 
they will pass 81,000 



cu. 



ft. 




second. 




enormous 





over 



■ 



Dam 




■■ 




An early stage in the building of the Grand Coulee Dam, showing the mile long conveyor used to 
remove the excavated material. The illustrations are reproduced by courtesy of the United States 

Bureau of Reclamation, Washington. 



Coulee 
will be the key structure in this scheme, regulatin^ 
the supply of water to the other barrages, and itself 





dealing with a fall of 355 ft., or nearly 30 per cent, of the 
total drop in the level of the river. It will be 3,000 ft. long 
and 500 ft. thick at the base, and about 4,300 ft. long and 
30 ft. thick at the crest. It will rise to a height of 550 ft. 
above bed rock, and therefore will not be as high as the 
727 ft Boulder Dam across the River Colorado in 
Arizona, In 




bed of the river were pounded by a waterfall 
in height. It is estimated that when the spillway is passin 
its maximum flow the energy of the falling water will 
be approximately 32,000,000 h.p. 



of water passin 

the spillway will plunge 
down the face of the 

curved 

to 
receive it, in order to 
avoid the erosion that 

would take place if the 

400 ft. 

s 








every other respect it will be much 
larger, however. For instance, it will contain 12 million 




pro 




ha 





cu. yds. of concrete, or more than three times the amount 
required for the Boulder Dam. Behind it will be formed a 



> been undertaken 
It will serve a vast 

a million acres of very fertile 
lying in the Big Bend Country, to the east of the gr 
curve of the river. In its present arid condition this land 

JL 



The Grand 

principally for irri 
area of more 






is 




active 




of little value, but when 




mighty reservoir 151 miles long, with an average width 
of 4,000 ft. and a maximum depth of 375 ft. This artificial 
lake will be the longest of its kind in the world. It will 
extend to the Canadian border, 151 miles away, and an 



with water it will produce a great variety of crops and will 



i 




homes for a large number of people. The Dam 



be 




source of 




le 




argest 



electrical energy. Part of this energy will 

and other purposes, and the 
L-west will provide a market for the remaining power. 







THE 




MAGAZINE 



641 



D 




The hydro-electric station will be built in two separate 



and 





one on 




will be about 765 ft, 



long and 



side of the river, 
112 ft. wide, and 



the brink of a precipice more than 400 ft, high, forming 










an immense 




three miles across and with a 



height above their lowest concrete foundations will be 



volume 100 times that of Niagara, 
Eventually the ice receded. The 




292 ft. 




will be 




made watertight to a 

point several 
above the maximum 
flood level. In 




po wer 



m a i n 



house 





ing units 




will I >e installed, each 
driven by a 150,000 

hydraulic tur- 
The output of 
the plant is expected 

be 1,890,000 kW, 

to 

and 

this will surpass by 

800,000 h.p. 




equi valent 

2,520,000 h.p., 




of 



the 



hydro-electric 

at 
Water 





through 



the 




came d 

Dam to the 

by 18 steel penstocks, 

each 18 ft. in 




River 

returned to its old 

and the can- 
high 




yon 



was 





dry, with only 

a few scattered lakes 

had 
the bed 



to show that 





once 

of a mighty river. 

This canyon is known 
to-day as the Grand 

It 

into the valley of the 
Columbia more than 






600 ft . 




ve 





the 



the 

river, 





engineers 
building the Dam are 
planning to 
good use of it. 

The Dam itself will 



ma 




rise at the exact point 

where the ice barrier 




The partly-completed western foundation of the Dam, with the Columbia River flowing tnrougn. The 

river is shown diverted from its normal course to allow excavation and other work to be carried out. 



once blocked 

o f 



gorge 



the 
t h e 




are 







in 



the concrete itself. 



constructional work involved 





eter, 

In order to follow 
in the Grand 
the 
back 

Columbia River. At one time this flowed 



project, and 



understand how 



irrigation scheme will work, it is necessary to go 
many thousands of years in the story of the 

from 
the 



bring about a similar result. 




and it will 



behind it 




the western 





o 







of the Rockies to the 




ap 



m 



Cascade Mountains through which it reaches the Pacific. 

fissures in the Earth's crust 






floods of 

it out of this 
channel, and forced it 



not rise to the height of the prehistoric river, however, 
but will be 295 ft. lower. The river therefore will not 
overflow into the Grand Coulee, and this will be 

pumping water into it from the lake 295 ft. below. 
The ancient canyon thus will be converted into a 








nines 





gi 



and 



in some Dlaces 880 ft. 




The rock walls of the Grand Coulee will form the 

. - 



of the reservoir, and its ends 




be 







lers 



90 ft. 




up 



aeainst 










n 

granite rocks of the Cas 

cade Mountains, so that 

it made a great bend. In 

the 

river gradually cut out 
for itself a mighty can- 
yon, which in places is a 
mile wide and 1,600 ft, 

the site of the 









Grand Coulee Dam there 
are granite rocks on both 
si 




of the river, and 
these will form the foun- 










the 



structure 



The 



lava flows have weather- 



ed a\ 
£ertile soil 




in to a very 




in height. 







their 

power from the station 
at the Dam, and will 



be 



nearly 




of 



raising 



tons of water 



1 "T J ^1 J 

a second. Later the water 



of 



the 



Grand 




Reservoir will 




11 






m 





southward in a 









canal leading to the area 
over which it will be 

distributed through 




21 






years ago 



sugg 
that 




Columbia could 



be 



dammed 



in 



order 





The Columbia River Landslides that threatened an excavation were prevented by the frozen earth dam shown above, farms with 





from 



was again dis 
its course thousands of years later, during the 

down 



Pipes through which frozen brine was circulated can be seen projecting above the dam 





Age, 
blocked 







north 



up 



the icy barrier, and eventually overflowed 
the southern rim of the gorge, cutting a new channel 

to its former course. The canyon it 

—m 

miles 



structure 




dreamed 







engineering 




laughed at 



m 



and the 








at right 
formed was 
wide, and at one 








g and from two to 

in it the river plunged over 



which is greater than that of the Panama Canal. This out- 
is corn- 
people 

How the 



lay will be amply repaid, 

pleted it will bring prosperi 




to 



the 



g carried out will 

a m 




described in 



article that will appear in next month's "M,M. 




tt 






642 



THE MECCANO 





Isle of Man Air Lines Re-organised 
The air services operating between 

England, Northern Ireland and the Isle 
of Man were until recently provided by 
the Manx Airway Section of Kail way Air 
Services, on behalf of the L.M.S., the Isle 

of Man Steam Packet 

Blackpool and West Coast 



Survey Flight in Australian Desert 




A party of Queensland business men 

made a flight from Brisbane to 
the remote Petermann Ranges in Central 
Australia to explore the inaccessible desert 





, and 
Services 




with a view to its 




ex 



A European Air Freight Line 

A company to operate fast air 
services between London and the principal 
European cities has been 





England 



Ltd., a subsidiary of OUey Air Services Ltd. 
These tli re e companies have now merged 
their interests in these air routes, and 






have become associated with Isle of Man 

Services Ltd.. the com- 



putation from a gold -mining standpoint. 
The prospectors were flown in a Qantas 

Empire Airways' aeroplane to a point in 
the Ranges that afforded the nearest 
approach by air to the region to be sur- 
veyed, and the party then proceeded by 



under the title of International 
Air Freight Ltd. Curtiss "Condor" biplanes 



with 



engines 




Wright 




• lone 




sen to fly the 



services. This type of American air liner 



weighs just over ei 




tons fully loaded, 






pany 




the lease 



of the airport at Ronalds- 
way, Isle of Man, This 
company is now operat- 
ing all "the internal air 
services to and from 
the Island. 

The growth of air 
travel to the Isle of Man 
is shown by the 

that from januarv to 





August this year 18,000 
passengers were carried 
to and from the Island 
by the Manx Airway and 




■ 




and 



West 



Coast 

the Saturday 

August Bank 



Services, On 

be fore 






companies 
tween them flew 90 trips 

and carried a total of 

600 passengers. 

Aerial War Against 



Mosquitos 

A campaign is 
w aged against mal aria - 






and of this total over two tons is payload. 

Its top speed is about 170 m.p.h. 

The first service to 
be started by the new 
compa ny operates 
tween Crov 

and Schiphol Airport 
A msterd am . The re are 
two trips daily in each 
direction from Croydon 
at 5.:<i() a.m. and 12 
noon, and from Schiphol 
at 8.45 a.m. and 3. 1 5 p.m. 
Each 
hours. 

distribution 

have been organised in 
the London area and 
at Amsterdam. 

The absence of passen- 
gers relieves the service 

from many restrictions 
as to the type of freight 



ff i gh t 




that 



can be car 




Considerable traffic in 







is 




An unusual view of one of the five Lockheed "Electra" air liners of British Airways Ltd., by whose courtesy 

this photograph is reproduced. 



perishable and fragile 

anticipated. 

When the service to 
Holland is well 

■ 

lisht 1, another will be 






breeding mosquitos in the Tennessee valley 
of the United States, and aeroplanes are 

ng employed very effectively to drop 
chemicals that destroy mosquito eggs and 
larvae It has been found that with a single 

aeroplane as much work can be accomplish- 
ed in one hour as two men operating from 

boats would do in a fortnight. 

America Regains International 

Record 

The Women's International Speed Record 
was recently regained for the United States 
by Miss Jacqueline Cochran, a well-known 

mf • **f J. 

American airwoman. She flew over a two- 
mile course at Wayne 
Detroit, and averaged 293.05 m.p.h. on four 
successive trips. Her fastest trip was made 
at a speed of 304.6 m.p.h. She used a 
Seversky monoplane fitted with a Pratt and 





camel team. The aeroplane was employed 
to keep in daily touch with the team, 
and to drop additional food supplies as 

required. 

The party were away from Brisbane just 
over 30 days, only six of which were 
occupied in flying to and from the Peter- 
mann Ratios, and their flight covered 
5,195 miles. The survey would have taken 
many weeks to carry out, if only surface 

transport had been employed. 

Solo Flight from Australia to South Africa 

Mrs. Dolores Bonney, an Australian 

airwoman, recently completed 

flight from Darwin, in 

to Capetown, South Africa. 

She flew a Klemm 32, a German type of 




that thi 



started, and it is ex- 
s will be to Belgium. 

Record Speed in King's Cup Air Race 

The King's Cup Race on I Ith September 
last was won by Mr. Charles Gardner for 
the second year in succession. He flew a 
Percival "Mew Gull" fitted with a D.H. 
"Gipsy Six*' Series 11 engine. As usual 
the first day of the Race was devoted to 
an elimi 




an in- 



teresting 





three-seat <r lox\ 






Whitney "Twin 




engine. 




wing monoplane 

was made to 



No 




The previous record was 276.53 m.p.h., 
was set up in 1934 by Mile. Helene 



set 

18,000 mile flight- 



up 

took 



records, 
early 



ii 



Boucher, of France, 



four months. The countries visited on the 
way included Java, Burma, Siam, India, 

Egypt, the Sudan and East Africa. 



ng contest, in which Gardner 
covered the 786.6-miles course at an 
average speed of 213.8 m.p.h. He improved* 
on this speed during the Final the next day, 
when he attained the high average of 
233.7 m.p.h. This is the first time that the 
Race has been won at a speed of over 
200 m.p.h. In the 1936 Race Gardner 




a Percival "Vega Gull." 
Second place was won by Brig. 
C. Lewin, in a Miles "Whitney Straight" 




A 

fitted with a D.H. i^ipsy major ' engine. 
He was accompanied by Sq. Ldr. de St. 





• navigator, and 
was 144,5 m.p.h. 



his 



aveni ere 



t> 













THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



643 



_■ 



A New Fokker Fighter 

The military monoplane shown in the 
upper illustration on this page is the 
Fokker G.I twin-engined fighter. It has 
been designed for attacking heavy bombers 
in the air, but can itself be used as a 

bomber, or for re- 
connaissance. 

The machine is 
of unusual design 



Junkers "Jumo 210" Aero Engine 

The latest Junkers aero engine is the 
Jumo 210" shown in the lower photograph 

page. It is a petrol-driven, four- 
stroke, water-cooled engine of the inverted 
Vee type, and the 12 cylinders are arranged 




on 





for 
tary 



*' Cambria's" Record Atlantic 

A new record for the crossing 
Atlantic by air was achieved 
Imperial Airways* flying boat ** 
on 27th-28th September last, when she 
flew from Botwood to Foynes in 10 hr. 33 

m i n . at an average 
speed of 190 nvp.h. 

The previous best 
time for the 



a large mili- 
aeroplane, 



and in appearance 

bles certain 




VIII 



r 



\ m erican 



of 
light 





twin -en g: 

aeroplanes, 
such as 
"Crusader" 



the 

illus- 
trated in the May 
1936 "M.Mr The 
fuselage is excep- 

It 




tion ally 

termin ates j us t 
behind the trailing 
edge of the wing, 
and the en gin e 
nacelles project 

rearward in the 





ward 



trip 



was 



exactly 1 hr. long- 
er, and was set up 

by the companion 

aircraft 



Cale- 
datria" on her east- 






ward 



flight 



on 



20th-21st August. 
The "Cambria" 

■ 

also holds the re 

cord for the fastest 
westward 






over 



the 




same 



route. This was 
accomplished 



on 



the 27th August 



The G.l twin-engined fighter, Uie latest type of Fokker military aircraft. The fuselage is very short, and the tail unit is carried 
at the end of long, tubular booms. Photograph reproduced by courtesy of N.V. Nederlandsche Vlietuigenfabriek, Amsterdam. 



last, 



when 



she 



form of two parallel, tapering booms, the 
sterns of which support the twin-rudder tail 
unit. The wing is of typical Fokker con- 
struction, and is covered with bakelite 
plywood. The booms have a duralumin 
framework and a metal stressed skin. 



The fuselage is mounted in the centre 
section of the wing, between the engine 
nacelles, and the cabin is provided with 
seats for the pilot and gunner. There are two 
fixed machine guns in the nose of the 
fuselage, and two 23 mm. cannons a little 

who has one on 

stern of the 



in two parallel, inclined rows. The front 

of the "Jumo 210" is so small that the 
engine fits neatly behind the hub of an 
ordinary three-bladed adjustable-pitch 
airscrew. It develops 680 h.p. and weighs 
974 lb., equivalent to 1.3 lb. per h.p. 

More Qantas Air Pilots for Imperial Airways 



"School" 




The three pilots of Qantas Empire 
Airways, the company operating the 
Singapore-Brisbane section of the England- 
Australia air route, who have been under- 
going training at the Imperial Airways 



made the Atlantic 
crossing from 



Foynes to Botwood in 14 hr. 24 min. 



The latest trip of the "Cambria" con- 
cluded the series of transatlantic experi- 
mental flights carried out during last 

summer. The 



have been notable 
for the accuracy of the weather forecasting 





and 



of special Fokker design, in 

which a 7.9 mm. gun is 
mounted on gimbals. The 

gun can be fired irrespective 
of the position of the turret, 
which 



can 



be 



rotated 



through 360 degrees. When 
the machine is employed as 
a bomber a load of about 
880 lb. of bombs is carried 

the 



on the un derside 








I'okker G.I was <l. - 









signed to be fitted with 
Bristol "Aquila" engines, 
but any radial type of about 
880 h.p. can be fitted. 

Hawker "Hartebeestes" for 
South African Air Force 






A 



• • 




H ar tebeestes ' J 



built 



of 65 Hawker 

is being 




the South African 



Air Force Depot at Roberts 

Pretoria. The 






the precision of the wireless services, 
have proved the practicability of a 

commercial air service across the North 

Atlantic. 

The England-India Flying Boat Route 

A series of survey flights over the 
Imperial Airways flying boat route to 

Karachi, India, is being 
carried out to test the 
flying boat bases that have 



been 



prov 




in readiness 



for the introduction of the 
Empire air mail scheme on 
this route next year. The 
section being surveyed ex- 
tends from Egypt to Karachi. 
The first flight was carried 
out by the Empire flying 
boat "Ceres " and stops were 
made at the new flying boat 

bases on Lake Galilee and 
Lake Habbaniyah, 50 miles 
from Baghdad, and at Basra, 
Bahrein, and Sharjah on the 
Persian Gulf. The second 
survey flight was carried out 
by the flying boat "Cen- 



tw 



aerp 




,nes success 

■ 



underwent its official 



trials rece 



n 



t 1 y 



at 



The Junkers "Jumo 210" water-cooled aero engine. It is of the inverted Vee type, with the 12 
cylinders arranged in two inclined rows, and develops 680 h.p. Photograph by courtesy of Junkers 

Flugzeug- und -Motorcnwerke A.G,, Dessau, 



the Swart kops air station in the presence 

of Defence and senior 



of the 
officers of 

The " 
H awker 




the 





S.A.A.F. 

:ebeeste ' is the well-known 

two-seater general pur- 
fighter, with modifications of the 
engine, armament, and equipment to 
make it specially suitable for South 



i § 



finishing 



school 



P I 



have returned home 



taurus. 

The organisation of the 

India- Australia section of 

the Empire flying boat route 

Between 
Karachi and Calcutta the 
flying boat alighting points 

will be a lake at Raj 
Samand, in Udaipur State, 



is m 




Four more of the company's pilots have 
arrived in England. Like the three who 

them, they have been engaged 





African 



ar mamen t ■ 




The 



aire 




engines and 
are being 



obtained from Great Britain, but all 
the other parts are being made in South 

Africa. 



in piloting the D.H. "Diana" air liners 
of Qantas Empire Airways, and further 
training is necessary to qualify them to take 
over the piloting of the Empire flying boats. 
The training they will undergo includes a 
special marine air course at Southampton, 
where they will master the technique of 
handling flying boats on the water as well 

as in the air. 



a stretch of water at Gwalior and a river 






at Allahabad. At Calcutta the aircraft 
will land on a section of river within 
the confines of the seaport. Further 
eastward the organisation will include 
the splendid harbour that has 
provided at Singapore, and flying boat 

s in Australia. 
The co m pie tion of the survey flig hts over 
this route will be followed by the establish- 






ing of regular 

first to Karachi, then 

finally to 




services 




at 



ngapore, and 




THE 




MAGAZINE 










nnnnnnnDnnnnnnnDnnnnnnnannnnnannnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnDnnnna 







of 












Pulling 




High 




By a Railway Engineer 




SOME of the heaviest express train workings in Ireland are 
operated over the Dublin-Cork main line of the Great Southern 

The calling at Queenstown of Atlantic liners tempts 
many American visitors to begin their European holidays by way of 




Ireland; tourist traffic to and 




Killamey is always heavy 



during the summer, and in consequence train loads of 350, 400 and 
even 450 tons have to be tackled on quite fast timings. The gradients, 
too, are in places exceptionally severe, and the big 4-6-0 loco- 
assistance. On the other hand 




motives frequently require 

there is no main line in the British Isles so absolutely free of speed 

restrictions. In this respect the 165.3-mile stretch between Dublin 

m 

and Cork is superior to the most famous racing tracks in Europe, 
including the main line of the L.M.S. between Euston and Crewe, 

the London-Doncaster section of the 

East Coast Route, and the main line 
of the Northern Railway of France 
between Pans and the Channel ports. 

My footplate journey was made on 
the hardest train of the 

- 



manned by Driver O'Neill and Fireman Brosnan of Cork shed, 
though in the course of a 



single day's work 




engines are 




the 



7 a.m. down mail. This express runs 
in connection with the L.M.S. "Irish 




tt 



w 




leaves 




at 



8.45 p.m. on the previous evening. On 
this occasion I crossed from Holyhead, 
and the arrival in Ireland, and the 
short run from Dun Laoghaire pier 



up to Dublin was an interesting pre- 



to the footplate journey 
* 'Hibern ia" made the 





The 



voyage 
the usual clockwork-like adher- 
ence to schedule, and on landing we 




found through 




for Belfast, 



Cork, and Galway drawn up in the 
pier station. Traffic from England is 

heavy, but on this 

through 

D u n Laoghaire to 

of a 







occasion 







Cork were provided. In 



c h ar ge 



handsome 




2 tank engine, No. 457, 



which belonged to the former Dublin 
and South Eastern 




we ran 



smartly enough along the south side 
of Dublin bay, and then threaded our 



way through the 




of the city 



past Westland Row, with its newly- 
completed electric signalling installa- 
tion; over the River Liffey, with fine 
views of the North Wall quays, the 
Custom House, and many other fine 

dings. Then a brief halt at Amiens 
St. Station to connect with the Great 

■ii- 

Northern system, and so round the 

northern fringes and into Kingsbridge, the Great Southern terminus. 
Here the rest of the mail train was waiting. Post Office sorting 

vehicles which were now 




regularly handled by crews from both Dublin and Cork sheds. 
With this substantial load a pilot was provided to give some help 
up the steep initial bank to Clondalkin; this was No. 328, one of the 
big 4-4-0s. Right at the platform end climbing begins at 1 in 117. 
Driver O'Neill started off on 60 per cent, cut-off, opening immedi- 
ately on to the main regulator, and then, as we passed Islandbridge 
Junction, where the gradient stiffens to 1 in 84, cut-off was reduced 

to 50 per cent, and the regulator pushed hard over to the "full," 
By this time the two engines were fairly rousing the echoes, but 
although the pilot was doing her fair share of the work the speed 
had only reached 23 m.p.h. when we passed the Great Southern 

works at Inchicore, a 
mile and a half out. 

Beyond this point the grade eases 
to 1 in 138, but No. 401 was still kept 
pounding away on 50 per cent, cut-off, 
and we came over the top of the bank 
at 38 m.p.h. This initial 4.4 miles, out 
to Clondalkin, had taken just 10 
minutes. From here onward we could 




easily have dispensed with the pilot, 
but to stop and detach the 4-4-0 at 

■I 

this point would have nullified the 
advantage gained up the bank, and 



so she went through to our first stop, 

at Kildare. Throughout this length the 

line is rising, very gradually for 






Cab view of otic of the Great Southern 4-6-0 locomotives, showing the simple 
and convenient footplate arrangements. Photograph by courtesy of the 

Great Southern Railways of Ireland. 



of the way, and through an intensely 
green countryside, the kind of land- 
scape that gained for Ireland its sub- 
title of The Emerald Isle, we bowled 

along under very easy steam. No. 401 

was now being worked on 25 per cent, 
-off with the first regulator only 
half open. A slack for permanent way 
repairs near Straffin troubled us but 

little. Speed then rose to B(S m.p.h. on 
the faint rise towards Newbridge, 

and then, without falling below 
52 m.p.h., we mounted the 2£ mile 

bank at 1 in 172 that leads over the 

Curragh, that rolling d!ownland that 
was once the Aldershot of Ireland. 
So we reached Kildare, 30 miles from 
Dublin, in 41£ minutes, three-quarters 

of a minute inside booked 

The pilot was now detached, two 
small vans were taken off the rear, 







and with this 

of 320 tons 





reduced 

and her crew 




specially 



vans, restaurant cars, and some 

added to the Dun Laoghaire portion made up a train of thirteen 

coaches, 323 tons tare, and 345 tons with passengers, luggage and 

mails. Our engine was No. 401, a two-cylinder 4-6-0, 
interesting in having Caprotti valve gear. But although this class 
are by far the largest express engines in Ireland, 

moderate-powered machines by present-day standards 
cylinders are 19A in. dia., by 28 in. stroke; the en up led wheels are 

6 ft. 7 in. dia,, and the boiler pressure is 175 lb. per sq. in. They are 
fitted with a Belpaire fire-box that is very wide, and permits only 

the 



buckled to it in real earnest. With a pleasing backward glimpse of 
Kildare Cathedral, and the Round Tower of St. Bridget high on 
the hillside, we got away in great style. Full regulator and 50 per 
cent, cut-orT produced a very rapid acceleration down the 1 in 180 



bank, and Driver O'Neill soon changed over to the first valve, full 





r are 




open, and 30 per cent, cut-off. Four miles from the start we were 
doing 6& m.p.h. and then over the slight ups and downs past 

Monasterevan and Portarlington we kept up a steady 57 to 65 m.p.h. 
One could now appreciate not only the fine riding qualities of the 
engine but the superb alignment of the track. On the footplate it 
goes without saying that there was plenty of racket, but the 




of a narrow rectangular look-out in the cab front, 
extra width of loading gauge due to the 5 ft. 3 in, gauge 

The most noticeable feature of a well-arranged cab is the reversing 
wheel for the Caprotti valve gear. This is mounted vertically, after 




were thus reeled off in 23 J minutes, 2| 



the 



s 




e of a "Schools 




4-4-0 of the 



English 




lern 



enough 



to 



Railway, but a very small rotational movement is 

produce quite a big variation in cut-off. In one complete turn of the 

wheel the gear is shifted from full forward to the full reverse 

position. The regulator is of the two-port type, with a double handle 
to make adjustment easier for the driver. On ray trip No, 401 was 



beautifully steady way in which the engine negotiated curves and 

junctions at high speed was most impressive. The 20.9 miles from 
Kildare to 

minutes inside schedule. 

Harder work is required on the next section. With another van 

detached from the rear, and load thus reduced to 310 tons, O'Neill 
started up the 1 in 230 rise out of Maryborough on 60 per cent, 
cut-off, opening well out on to the main regulator. The engine 



responded with a roaring exhaust 




a splendid 




;ion, 




assing Clonkeen, just two miles out, at slightly over 40 m.p.h. 
>he was then let go full tilt downhill on the main regulator and we 



4 



3 



t 



% 




THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



645 



— 



raced through- Mountrath at 67 m.p.h. I was very interested in the 
method of firing. Although the fire-box: is wide at the top it tapers 

narrow grate that one finds on 4-6-0 



gf 

usual 



Limerick Junction is the safety valve of the whole Irish railway 




down to the 

engines, and yet each shovelful of coal was being placed with the 
same meticulous care that one notes on the L.N.E.R. wide fire-box 
types. At each firing the driver assisted his mate by closing the fire 



system. Throughout their coun 
structed a thoroughly logical 




imen planned and con 




doors between 



each 



spoliation scheme, 
and although the train running was not as fast on some lines as it 

might be, it certainly was straightforward. But when it came to 
connecting up the old Waterford and Limerick Railway with the 

main line from Dublin to 



shovelful; normally the 
two sliding doors were 
left just ajar so that the 
state of the fire could 
be seen. 

■ 

By this time we were 
past Gnddagh, going 64 
m.p.h., and just begin- 
ning the three-mile climb 
at I in 128 that leads to 
Ballybrophy. O'Neill 

opened right out to full 




tor, increasing cut- 
off at the same time to 3;> 

per cent., and we got up 

the bank without speed 
falling below 41 m.p.h. 





an excellent piece of 
work. A minute later we 
were running in 
brophy, having covered 
the 1 5.7 miles from Mary- 
borough in 20 1 minutes; 
here again booked time 
had been improved upon 
by 2 J minutes. On the 





Cork, national chara 

or 

istics could be restrained 
no longer, and in one 



glorious 



I i 




tling" 





they 
way 



Irish-isms in to on e sq u are 
miie of countryside than 
are to be found in all the 
rest of Erin put together. 

c Junc- 
tion the Great Southern 

be an Irish 






But in spite of all the 
complications, the c 
flicting cross -over move- 



ments, reversals of direc- 
tion, and the fact 
modern 





trains 
have far outgrown that 

one long platform, traffic 
is operated very smooth- 
ly. Procedure has been 
reduced to a fine art. In 






C.S»R. No. 401, the engine on which the journey described in this article was made* It is one of two fitted 

with Caprotti poppet valves, and the valve boxes are prominent above the cylinders. 



Spite 



of the varying 

I " Jk ■ — i _ 



next stage, to Thurles, the line undulates at more or less easy 







the general tendency being dead level; but at the same 
time there is a very marked change in the landscape. The vivid 
green meadowlands of County Kildare graduallv eive place, as the 
line crosses Queen's County,' to wider rough 




ranges of hills rise above the level of the plains, and ahead there 

is a hint of loftier wilder mountains. 

On getting away from Ballybrophy, after a short spell on the 
main regulator, the driver changed over to what appeared to be his 
favourite method of working, 30 per cent, cut-off and the first 



regulator full open. 



N o. 



401 was soon 




ing again; we entered 



County Tipperary at exactly 70 m.p.h., took the slight rise through 



Templemore at G7£, and were going s 




r at 72 m.p.h. on the 



very gradual decline beyond when we had to slow up for permanent 



airs. In s 




of this 



way rep 

we covered the 20 miles from 

to Thurles in 23 




lengths of train, drivers 
seem to know the exact spots at which to stop on the main line; 
while points operation and the backing movements are carried out 
very quickly. On this trip of mine Driver O'Neill ran through to a 
very smart stop at the south end, and a minute-and-a-half later we 
had backed right across the up main line and were at rest in the sta- 
tion. The 20 J -mile run from Thurles to our stop on the main line 
before backing in took just 24 minutes, another very smart 
piece of work. 

After a halt of five minutes we got away again on the longest 
non-stop run of the whole journey, the 37. 6-mile stretch to Mallow. 
On each successive stage the locomotive work seemed to be getting 
finer and finer, and now with full regulator and 60 per cent, cut-off 
No. 401 boomed her way up the 1 in 156 ascent out of Limerick 
Junction. Eastward lay the Gal tee Mountains, a noble range of 

frowning crags dominated by 
the shapely cone of Gal tee- 



minutes, a minute inside 
schedule; unchecked we should 

have done it a minute quicker 

still. At Thurles, as at every 
other 




^ 






_. ng 
men were waiting to board the 

tender and help the fireman 

to get coal forward. The fuel 

was rather 

little better than slack 

a 

it obstinately refused to shake 
down as the tender was 
emptied. In the fire-box, too. 




m 




Brosnan 




times 




to 



ram the coal forward from an 
accumulation under the door. 

engine 



_ 

Nevertheless 



the 



steamed splendidly, and the 
gauge needle was stock still 
at 175 lb. per sq. in. for most 
of the run. As for the coal and 
its dustiness — well, I shall 
never forget the sight of my 
face when I came to clean up 




more. Once up the first bank 
No. 401 was quickly into her 
normal stride and we swung 
through Emly at 65 m.p.h., 

here 



but 



al 




just 
"spot 



■long 



a very 



live i 



some 





Locomotive Wo. 401 on an express from Dublin approaching Cork. The well-kept permanent way 
is characteristic of the Great Southern Railways. Photograph by Mr. R. Murphy, Cork. 



at Cork; I could not have been grimier if I had tried to bury my 

head hi the tender! My dungarees fairly glistened with coal dust. 

From Thurles there is a splendid start down falling grades to 

the valley of the River Suir, and in six miles we were doing 704 m.p.h. 

I in 230 rise to Goulds Cross was cleared at a minimum of 




<>1 m.p.h., and then we continued at a steady average of a mile-a- 
minute across the level plain of Tipperary, amid a 




green 

chequerwork of hedgerows and square fields. So we came to 
Limerick Junction, the strangest layout imaginable. 

Much lias been written about the curiosities of working at this 
station, and in the "M.M/' for November 1935 the procedure was 
described in full detail. But it has always seemed to me 




of bother" de- 
ed on the footplate. The 
am injector was giving 

trouble, and this, 
combined with a particularly 
dusty patch of coal, caused 
the boiler pressure to fall. 
Driver O'Neill's handling of 
the engine during this 
ward stage was very skilful. 
Down the racing descent past 
Kilmallock he shut oil steam 

altogether, but impetus and 
the astonishingly free running 
so characteristic of 
valve gear engines enabled us 
to keep up a steady 66 m.p.h. 
This gave a useful respite to 
the boiler. The moment we 
reached the foot of the bank 
'Neill opened well out on to the main regulator, and this with 30 
per cent, cut-off sharpened the blast, drew the fire, and took us up 
CharleviUe bank at the brilliant minimum speed ~* " %t 







pressure gauge needle was still inclined to 




i m.p.h. 

but the 



engine was fairly "let fly" on the moderate grades beyond, and 
at Buttevant we touched 75 m.p.h. 

We went splendidly up the three-mile ascent to the oddly-named 
summit of Two Pot House, mounting this grade of 1 in 142-230 at a 
lowest speed of 51J m.p.h., and once speed was up to 60 again on the 
descent to Mallow, Driver O'Neill shut off steam and let the engine 
coast. In spite of these hindrances the 37.6 miles from Limerick 
Junction were covered in 44* minutes, just on the right side of 





MECCANO MAGAZINE 



^ 



schedule time, while in response to this fine enginemanship the 

boiler pressure steadily rallied until it reached blowing-off point 
while we stood in Mallow station. 

A ■!■■■■ 

We needed every ounce of steam now, for the last stage into Cork 
is very heavily graded. Mallow lies in the Blackwater valley, at the 
junction of the Kiliarney branch, and the main tine climbs south- 



away, and speed was up to 30 m.p.h. ere we were out of sight of 
M o urn e Abbey, a fragmentary rti in standing sentinel on the hillside. 



As we roared our way up cut-off was reduced little by little, but even 



when we topped the summit we were 




going on 50 per cent.; speed 



ward 



between 



the 



Nagles and Bogger 

Mountains. 





e the 

railway rises at 1 in 



125-140 



for 



nearly 
seven miles. On getting 
away there is a glorious 
view, eastward from the 

of the Knock- 
mealdown Mountains, 
while in 



had then risen to 36 m.p.h. There was no restraining the engine 
downhill now, and on 30 per cent, cut-off and the first regulator we 

went pell m ell for Cork. 
Rathduff was passed at 
59 m.p.h. and 

leaped up through the 

s; eighty, and 











direction 

glimpsed some 

heights of 

Now the run was work- 
ing up to a really glori- 
ous climax. On full 

regulator and 60 

cent, cut-off No. 
literally roared 

among the hills; 

rose to 34 m.p.h. on the 

I in 125 pitch, and then 

as we came on to the 

slightly easier length at 1 in 140 the engine was going so well that 

O'Neill linked up to 45 per cent. We steadily accelerated. Nearing 

Mourne Abbey we were doing 38 m.p.h. — great work this — when 



till we tore 
through Blarney at 83 
m.p.h. We continued at 

a terrific puce right to 

the top of the precipi- 
tous incline that leads 
down into Cork, and 

then as we began the 
descent O'Neill checked 

to about 50 



the 
m.p.h 




We 



coasted 





C.S.R. No. 401 running on to the turntable at Cork. This 

of these engines, which 



photograph shows very well the characteristic appearance 
are the largest in Ireland, 



alas, signals were against us, for the first time in the whole run. The 
driver kept steam on until we were past the distant signal, but it was 
of no avail, and we slowed down to walking pace through Moume 
Abbey station. Then, just as a stop seemed inevitable, the starter 
was pulled off and in a moment O'Neill had given No. 401 "the lot." 

And now the engine was put to it with redoubled vigour. On full 
regulator and no less than 70 per cent, cut-off we verily thundered 



smoothly down the 1 in 

60 gradient, 

carefully all the way, 

we entered Kil- 
barry tunnel at about 
30 m.p.h. A couple 
of minutes later we 
emerged rounding the 

at Mourne 




curve into Cork. In spite of that nasty 

Abbey we had almost kept time, covering the 20.8 miles from 

Mallow in 29| minutes. 

At most of the intermediate stations we stayed slightly over- 



time on account 

than recovered 




traffic, but these arrears were more 



splendid work that Driver O'Neill got 
out of No. 401. Indeed he gained in all 11 J minutes on schedule 
time and made the complete run from Dublin in 3 hours 52 
minutes, instead of the 3 hours 55 minutes booked. A very spirited 
and entertaining performance. 



The 



ii 



Sil 



ver 





The "Silver City Comet" is the first of four 

high-speed semi-streamline Diesel trains to 
be placed in regular service between Parkes 

and Broken Hill, on the New South Wales 

Railways of Australia. Broken Hill is a 

famous metalliferous mining centre, and in 

the days of steam travel passengers wishing 

to reach it from 



Sydney found the 



system and it in cor 



control as 



well 





5 a "dead-man" 




retardation" con- 

the maximum 



troller. At high 
braking force is available and by a pendu- 
lum action the braking force is reduced 

as the train slows down, thus minimising 
the risk of the wheels skidding. 




The seats are reversible, and so enable 
passengers to face whichever 
they prefer. Each car has a centre corridor 

at each end. 

riding of 




and an entrance 

In order to ensure the 

the train the axles of each car run in 




self- 




.1 in g 



roll 



journey 

tiresome, 
now 





and 




leave 




Sydney at night 

a sleeping-car train, 
and change over to 



the 



Silv 



et 



City 

Comet" at Parkes the 





arriving at Broken 
Hill, 427 miles away, 
the same evening. 
The power car of 



the 




in is divided 



into three main com- 
part men ts. 




a 

driver's cabin at each 

central 




er-bearing axle-boxes. 
R ubber pads are u sed 

exclusively through- 
out the bogie spring- 
ing system, so that 
the 





are en - 

insulated from 



car. 

merit 



body 

This 



of 



the 



arrange - 
reduces th 



<■ 



noise and vibratioi 

to a mini mum. 



i 





re 



end. 



T he 



compartment is the 



The - •Silver City Comet, 1 ' the Diesel-electric train introduced on the New South Wales Railways. This photograph and the 
information contained in the article are reproduced by courtesy of the Commissioner for Railways, New South Wales, 



served throughout 

the train and an 

electricaUy-equ ippe< I 
buffet is part of 

the equipment. This 
buffet is the first 

6 



kind 



main engint room, on each side of which is 

an auxiliary engineroom and a baggage 

artment- Motive power is supplied by 




8-cylinder two-cvele Diesel engines 
each developing 330 h.p. Two 34-h.p. four- 
Diesel engines are installed in the 
iry engine compartment. Each of 
is coupled to a generator for the 
purpose of supplying power for train 

ing, air conditioning of the passenger 




lighti 











the buffet and compressed 

braking system. The air brake is the 

Westinghouse automatic straight air 



A powerful headlight assists the driver 

to see the roan 1 ahead during periods oi 
darkness and a novel feature, similar 
to that used on some American trains, 
is a vertical beam of light that is provided 

drivers of road vehicles about 

to ascerta in 




to en 

to use the level 

the position of an oncoming train. 

rr%* _ i#rf—'f *"■ _-* _ X> *i* •_ _ 




The "Silver 




Comet ' is a well- 



appointed train and provides something 
new in railway travel in Australia. The 
cars are of the saloon type, with large 
windows similar to those now fitted 

■ 

to the vehicles of modern British expresses. 



with a 

necessary 
during the 






ii i A u s- 
is fitted 




erator and other appliances 
the preparation of 

All 




work 



or 



plated, 
The 




journey. 

the buffet is of 




metal 

steel 



aluminium, or is chromium 



passenger cars are fitted with air- 




itioning apparatus of the most modern 



through 



a 



type. Fresh air is drawn in 

louvred recess in the roof, and after being 
cleaned it is heated or cooled according to 
requirements. Insulation is provided in the 

and double 





. sides 
windows are fitted. 






■ 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



647 








b 



nnnnnnDnnnunnnnnnnnnnnnnDDnnnnnnn 
a 

□ 
a 

a 

a 

D 

a 
a 

a 

ana 







- 

for 



Oil 





Rotary 




Great 





■■ 



ARE there any underground reservoirs of oil in Great Britain j 
This is a question that has long engaged the attention of experts. 
During the Great War, when difficulties were encountered in obtain- 
ing the necessary supplies from abroad, wells were drilled in 
Derbyshire and other parts of the country, but with little success; 
and except for the comparatively small yield from the shale beds of 
Scotland, we depend entirely on imported supplies. During the last 

years a thorough search has been undertaken to ascertain 

definitely whet iter oil exists or not. The Anglo-American 





annnnnn 

suspended inside a derrick that may be 130 ft. high. The drill pipes 
are very heavy steel tubes from 4 in. to 6 in. in outside diameter. 
They are made in 30 ft. lengths that can be screwed together, and the 
bit is screwed into the bottom of the pipe. The bit is lowered to the 
surface of the ground and the whole assembly is given a 
motion that causes it to dig its way into the Earth under its 

weight. Until recently steam engines were used for operating the 
machinery that rotates the drill, but Diesel — ' - 




engines 



are now 




Company Limited have been actively engaged in this search, for 
which they hold a prospecting license coven nv, in area of 

miles, and have 

An unsuccessful effort has recently been made to find oil at 




sq. 
several promising rock formations. 

4 1J 





Hellingley, Sussex, and 
Dalkeith, near Edinburgh, 
in 1919, from which a 

Many people think that oil occurs 
in underground lakes or rivers, but 
really it is found in porous rocks such 
as sandstone and limestone. It was 
probably formed thousands of years 
ago from vegetation, marine plants or 
organisms, which decomposed under 
the influence of heat and pressure, 
producing the liquid known to-day as 
crude oil. This is lighter than water, 
and immediately after its formation 
floated upon any water that happened 
to be present. Thus it gradually work- 
ed its way upward, and where all the 
rocks above it were porous it eventu- 



now begun for a well at 
site of this is near a 





of crude oil were obtained. 




to the 









ally reached the surface of the earth 
and evaporated. 

In some places, however, the pro- 
gress of the oil was barred by non- 
formations, such as clay, 

en distorted by earth 

resembling 



porous 

which had 

movements into 





underground hills. These hills arc 
known as anticlines, and the oil 
trapped in them gradually accumu- 
lated, forming the reservoirs that 



drillers strive 

oil is under 




reach to-dav. The 



pressure, from 



gas 



dissolved in it and from water beneath, 
so that care must be exercised in com- 




ng the wells. The 




during 



The opening oi a trial oil well recently bored al Hellingley, Sussex, 
the type of rotary drill used in the 

of the Anglo-American 



drilling are always full of heavy mud, 
which exerts a pressure greater than 

the oil and gas. As this mud is slowly 

baled out, the oil is allowed to come to 

the surface, and is conducted to tanks , 
through heavy steel pipes. 

It is a difficult task to find these 
hidden stores of wealth. The surface 
rocks of the area to be prospected are 
first examined, for their slope is a clue to the hidden formations in 
the depthsof the Earth beneath them. When an underground hill of 

the right kind has been found, the manner in which it has been 
formed and the nature of the strata below the surface must be taken 
into account. Thus if there are layers of volcanic rock there will be 
no oil, for such rock is too solid to allow the oil to soak through it. 
On the other hand, porous sandstones, limestones and sands 
form suitable layers for the movement and collection of oil. 

When the geologist has found conditions that seem to indicate 
suitable underground formations, the work is turned over to the 
engineer, who erects drilling machinery capable of penetrating if 
necessary 10,000 ft. or even more into the Earth, in order to reach 
oil-bearing rock. Drilling is an expensive process, and if no oil is 
found, the cost of the operations is a complete loss. Even if oil is 
present the bores may just miss the porous rock reservoir, and the 

~ ' — wells — - 



often employed for the purpose. 

After the drill has penetrated 30 ft. another length of drill pipe is 

and so on with fresh sections as the bit forces its way 
through the ground. A mixture of clay and water known as rotary 
mud is pumped down through the interior of the drill pipe and is 
ejected with terrific force through two holes in the bit near the 
cutting edge. The rotary mud washes the cuttings and pieces of 

where they settle in pits, and the mud is 

re-circulated. This circulation also 
tends to have a cementing action on 
the walls of the hole, and prevents 
it from caving in. 

The fishtail bit, the name of which 
indicates its shape, is employed when 
drilling through relatively soft materi- 
al, such as clay or sand, and special 
rock bits are used for boring through 
harder rocks, such as gypsum, lime- 
stone and sandstone. The latter bits 
are equipped with cones having very 
sharp teeth, and with the weight of 
the drill pipe above them they grind 
their way through the rocks. 

It is often necessary to take samples 
of the strata through which the drill is 
penetrating, and for this purpose a 
core bit is used. This cuts a hole in the 
shape of a ring, leaving the central 



portion u n ton 




As the cores are 



taken they are drawn to the surface in 
pieces 1 5 ft. to 20 ft. long, and are 

inspected by a geologist, who is able 

to identify the characteristics 



of 



the rock. 







operations. Photograph by courtesy 
Oil Company Limlte 



the surface the diameter of 
the hole is usually from 15 in. to 
20 in. When a few hundred feet 
have been drilled steel casing is 
inserted, and cement is pumped u 
between the outside of the casing an 
the walls of the hole in order to pre- 
vent the latter from crumbling, and 

to keep out surface water. The 
hole is then drilled deeper with smaller 
bits, and more casing of a smaller size 
is inserted. This continues until the 







oil-bearing layer is encountered. 
Once drilling operations are started 



they proceed day and night without break, the rig being operated 
by three crews of men, who work eight hours each. It would 
be impossible to shut down operations during the night-time, 
lor the 

collapse, 




of the well that had not been encased might 




sand and clay settling out from the rotary m 



would choke the bottom of the hole. 

During the boring it is continually necessary to withdraw the 



drill pipe from the hole in order to change the bit. A good team 
of men can do this at a remarkable speed, withdrawing over 
a mile of pipe in from three to four hours. The pipe is hoisted 

three sections extends above 





until a length consisting of 

This Jen 

process 

been removed. 



surface 
tached, and the 






is unscrewed in one piece and de- 
all the pipe has 



is 









dug of one or two 





ve 



CO 




easily rum a 



When the well is ready for production, tubing 2 in, to 4 in. 



company that had not a large financial backing. 

Rotary drilling, in which a bit is rotated at the end of a hollow 

most commonly employed, and the 



pipe, is 



necessary gear is 



in diameter is often inserted, and through it the oil and gas come 
to the surface. The well may be a "gusher," with the oil flowing to 
the surface under its own pressure. When the natural p ressure is 
exhausted it becomes necessary to pump the oil to th e surface. 




THE MECCANO 





A Large Surface Condenser with 63i miles 



of Tubes 



The 



In 




rn 




power stations the 
generators are driven by steam turbines. 



Millwall Dock Scheme 



of London Authority has 




From the turbines the steam passes into a 
condenser that performs two important 
duties. It turns into water the steam that 
has done its work in the turbine, so that it 

can be used again to feed the boilers, and 
in conjunction with an air ejector it 
maintains a high vacuum on 



decided to carry out a number of improve- 
ments at the Millwall Dock. The East 

is 




Quay, Inner Millwall Dock, 
1,310 ft. in length, is to be widened, and 
the dock itself will be deepened by dredging 
to give a uniform depth of water of 29 ft. 
The No. 4 dolphin, at which vessels from 
West African ports have hitherto been 



An All-Electric Open-Air Swimming Pool 

A giant open-air swimming pool, in the 



successful 



&2" 



an 






Croydon. The 



of which 

part, has been con 

is 200 ft 




long and 70 ft, wide, and is surrounded by 
flower beds, grass lawns and shingle sun- 













a u s t side 




the 




ensuring 



a 



the 

turbine, 

steady flow of steam. 

There are many types of 

condensers, but those used 

for turbines are nearly al- 
ways of the surface type. In 
these the exhaust steam is 

■ 

condensed by coming into 

contact with a cold surface, 
in the same way that steam 
from a kettle can 
densed by discharging it on 
to a cold plate. The cold 
surface is provided by brass 



s, 60 ft. 

wide, have been constructed in each of 
the longer sides, giving an overall width 

at the centre of 100 ft. The 
depth varies from 3 ft. 6 in. 




co n - 




cold 

■ ■ - 



pa 

denser so far 




tubes, through w 
water is pumped. 

The illustration on this 
e shows the largest con- 

made in this 

- 

country. It was built by 
Worthington-Simpson Ltd., 
Newark-on-Trent, and con- 
tains nearly 18,000 brass 
tubes, each of f in. inside 

which provide a 
cooling surface of 65,000 sq. 
ft. The total length of tubes 
is 63 
pumps 

gallons of water through the 

tubes every hour. The pres- 

is 







miles. Two large 
discharge :*.nuo,uo0 




at 




end to 6 ft. 6 in 



at the centre, with a 15 ft. 

deep diving pool in one 

of the bays. 

The water for the pool is 

means of an 





and 



is 



electrode boiler, 
sterilized by ozone, which is 

The 
installation is considered to 





: 



be the first in which elec 



tricity is used for both 
purposes in such a manner. 

oiler was 



The electrode 
constructed by Sulzer Bros. 

- 

(London) Ltd., and has a 
capacity of 750 kW. The hot 
water from it is circulated 

a heat exchanger 
by means of a pump coupled 



directly to a 5-h.p. motor, 



throu gh 




i 








ure is mam 



tained by automatic thermo- 
stat control. 

The rapid nitration plant 

is capable of 



employed 



sure in the 
about £ lb 




A giant condenser for a turbine power plant. It has a cooling surface of 65.UDU so. It. and is Uie 
largest made in this country. Photograph by courtesy of Worming ton -Simps on Ltd., Newark-on-Trent. 



treating the 650,000 gals, 
of water contained in the 

- 

pool once in six hours. 
After passing through the 

filter plant the water is 
retu 





sq. in. absolute, that is, 
about 14.2 lb. per sq, in. below the average 
of the atmosphere 



The 




steam enters through a hole 



1 6 ft. by 12 ft. in the top of the condenser. 
The water formed falls into a vessel under- 
neath, and from there is pumped through 



discharged, will be removed. The work 
will take about 18 months to complete and 
is estimated to cost nearly £\ 10,000. 

upplying London's Gas 







heating equipment to the boilers. Two 
openings are provided on the side of the 
casing for connections to an 

which withdraws the air from the con- 
denser and discharges it to the atmosphere, 



During the past five years the Gas, Light 
and Coke Company, London, have laid over 







T 





con 



bin 




end covers of 
so that access can re a 



200 miles of gas mains annually. Recently a 
length of gas main laid down at Woodford 
brought the total mileage of the company's 
mains up to 6,000, a figure greater than that 



of any other similar company in the world. 




in special 







be 



About 1,800 men have 




employed 



gained to the tubes when they require 
cleaning or repairs. Altho 
weigh 7 tons 



ug 




the 



continually in laying the pipes 
repair work. 




in 



covers 



■ 




they can be swung 
on their hinges by the pull of one finger. 

The weight of the condenser in working 

order is over 250 tons, and it is carried on 
springs so that it can expand and contract 
freely under changes of temperature. 



An area of 540 square miles is served bv 

1 W 



the Company, the 




of consumers of 




as being about 1,500,000. The distributing 
em now consists of some 2,650,000 




s 

pipes, with diameters varying from 2 in. 

to 4 ft. and having a total weight of 
560,000 tons. 



^^^' 



to the pool through 
the heat exchanger, where it is re- warmed 

by the heat produced by the boiler. 
The ozone for sterilizing the water is 

in which 
air is subjected to the action of an electric 
discharge. The ozone is fed into the 
filtered water delivery main, and also 
is blown directly into the 
small tubes, 
At night the 




in the floor. 





ool 



is illuminated 




electric lights contained in 36 port holes 

built into the sides below the water 
level. Each port is covered with £ in. 
plate glass, and contains a 1.000-W 

lamp backed by a stainless steel reflector. 

San Gabriel Dam 

The San Gabriel No. I Dam near Los 

■ . 

Angeles, in the United States of America, is 

now completed. It is a rock-fill structure 
355 ft. in height above bedrock, and is the 

lest dam of its type yet built. 










* 



© 







THE 







MAGAZINE 



649 



- 

An Interesting 12-wheeI Trailer 

The upper illustrations on this page 
show a 40-ton low loading trailer designed 
for carrying 




concentrated 




A New Funicular Railway 

A funicular railway that will rise to a 
height of 3,000 ft. in a distance of 1 } miles is 
now being built from the Bernina Pass 




such* as transform r.-rs, The trailer is 16 ft. * above Pontresina. Switzerland, 
in length and 8 ft. 



the 





loading 

7§ in. It was built by 

R. A. Dyson and Co. 

Ltd., Liverpool, for the 

Munici- 



Extensions to Battersea Power Station 

■ 

costing about £1,500,000 
are to be made to the Battersea Power 

Station of the London Power Company. 
This work constitutes the beginning of the 
second half of the station, the first half of 



which is complete and in 



Central 





trailer was sup- 
plied in chassis form, and 

which consists 

of £ in. chequered steel 
plate, 





was fitted 



in 



South. Africa. It has 12 
wheels, four at the front 
in line, and two lines of 

each 

with 



company 



include 




four 

being 

twin 




wheels 
are steel castings, and 

are mounted on axles in 

■ — - 

such a manner as to en- 

sure their being kept 

rigidly in line. 
Each axle is fitted with 






two springs, which are 
capable of oscillating to 
allow the wheels to con- 
form to lumps, ruts and 

other irregularities in the 

road surface when travel- 
ling over rough country. Brakes are pro- 
vided on one line of wheels at the rear, and 
are operated in pairs by independent hand 
brake screws and 

■ 

of the trailer. 





Board 



. The 
authorised 




install plant with, a 



generating capacity of 100,000 kW. This 



16,000 kW high-pressure 



turbo-alternator, a 78,000 kW low-pressure 
set and a 6.000 kW house set. 

More Hydro -Electric Schemes 

.Work 




in progress on 

several large hydro-electric power schemes 

various parts of the world. In Russia 

power stations are being built 
on the Volga to develop an annual output 

new section of 

this scheme now to be commenced includes 
the building of a dam on the Volga that 

increase 

river 

about 1 00 ft 





generating 



plants 



built, 



one 



Two 

are 
of 



The iDustration on me r 

shows the 12-wheeled 40-ton 
trailer described an this page. 
It is fitted with oscillating axles, 

the arrangement of which can 
be seen in the illustration above. 

Photographs by courtesy of I 

and Co. Ltd., 



1,500,000 kW capat 




o t he r 



dam, and the 
1,000,000 kW 



capacity, which will be 

about 62 miles 
downstream. These two 

_ 







To ste 







the trailer while it is being 



loaded or discharged, six hydraulic jacks 
are supplied, three of which are placed on 
each side of the vehicle. When not in use 






the jacks are carried in special boxes. 

To ensure safety in the handling of 
such a heavy vehicle the Dyson Patented 

ar is fitted. In this design 
centre leg of the drawbar takes all 
the pull, whilst the 

side members simply 

lock . 






stations will be capable 

roducing annually 

14,000 million kW of 
electric energy. 




Another 



i 





■ 






g 




Diavolczza Glacier. The new railway will 

connect with the Bernina line runnin 

St. Moritz past Celerina and Pontresina 

over the Bernina Pass into Italy, and will 
cost about /1 00,000 to build. 



Largest German Motor Road 



Bridge 



The largest of all the many bridges so 
far erected in connection with the construc- 



scheme is to be carried 
out in the Laxapana 

Valley, Ceylon. This entails the construc- 
tion of a dam 345 ft. long, the top of 



which will be 94 ft. 



above the 



level of 



the original river bed, and 2,844 ft. above 
sea level. The water from the lake formed 
behind the dam will be conveyed through 
a tunnel 7,863 ft. long, to a surge chamber 
on the hillside, and from there it will 
be conducted through pipe-lines to a 



actuate 



the 



Safety chains also are 
provided. 

Testing the Strength 

of a Bridge 

An old brick arch 
bridge built to carry 
road traffic over the 




Strafford -on- A von 
Canal at Birmingham, 

is to be replaced with 
a new bridge of rein- 
forced concrete. 

fore it is demolished, 

however, experiments 

are to be made by the 

Building Research 
Station of the De- 
partment oi Ind us- 
trial and Scientific 

Research to ascertain 
the strength of the 
bridge. The Ministry of Transport is collect- 
ing information regarding the strength of 

various types of bridges, and this Birming- 

bridge is among those that are to 




p jwer station 1 ,500 ft 
below. 

The power station 
will house three tur- 
bines coupled direct 
to 11, 000- volt three- 
phase alternators 



• 



which will produce 
25,000 kW. 

German Buses de 

Luxe 

Road coaches 

with res- 

* 

in w 

i wines, 

chocolates, eggs and 
cold meat 
served , 



equi 
taurants 











in service in 






West Germany. These 

great vehicles scat 35 



A Prieshnan Dredging Crane at work on the Great Ousc. An article describing this work, and the machines engaged in 
it, appeared on page 6S4 of the "M.M.'* for December 1936. Photograph by courtesy of Pricstman Bros. Ltd., Hull. 



persons 



and the din- 



ham 




be Jested to breaking point. 

enable the experiment to be made 
closing the route, the first half of 

the new bridge will be built adjacent to the 

old one and connected to the existing ap- 
proaches by means of a temporary roadway. 



tion of the new German motor roads is being 

built near Limburgam-Lahn. The bridge 

will measure 1,500 ft. from end to end, and 



will stand 




200 ft. 



high. 



It will 



consist of 13 arches, each having a span 



of 90 ft . 



The new bridge 



- 

is being erected near 
the 700 -year-old Cathedral of Li m burg, 
and will provide a striking contrast with 
that ancient edifice. 



'•: 



ing saloon is a separ- 
ate compartment con- 



taining a table for eight. A well-equipped 



library is also carried. 



also 




are becoming 
the country. 





Sleeper coaches 

popular in certain 
These are luxury 

specially built seats that can be reversed 
in a few moments to form comfortable 
beds. Radio equipment is provided for 
the entertainment of passengers during 
the day. 




THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 






pDaDDDanDnnnaDCXinnannaDnDnannnnnnnnannnnDDannnnnnanDannDannnnnana 



D 

D 

a 

D 

D 
D 
□ 

a 
a 

D 




The 






D 

□ 

□ 

a 





of 



an 




esting System 



By A. Meyer Shalom 






□ 
□ 

a 
a 

a 



nDnDaanannnnannDnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnDnnnnnnDnnnnDnnDnnnnnnnnnnDnnnnD 




■ i 

HE story of the Iraq Railways is of special interest, for 
the whole of their development has taken place within 
less than 25 years. The present system has grown largely 
from the lines of various gauges constructed for military 

purposes 

Great War. 




the 




line in Mesopotamia, as 



Like the Basra to Amarah line, this has been dismantled 
since the War, as it was considered unsuitable for 
military or commercial purposes. 

The present metre gauge line connecting Basra with 

Baghdad follows what 

the 

and 




was 

m .was 




cou 



nt 



ry 



erly 

earlier, 

the 
was under 




Turkish rule. This was a 



German 







over 




rise of 






uge, runnmg 

74 miles from 

Baghdad to Samarra, 
its course being roug 







may 



be 



termed 





incorporates the section 
as far as Ur of the first 



line 



from 



Basra 






to 



Nasiriyah. Ur was link- 



ed 




with Hillah, a 



point to which a line 
from Baghdad had been 
brought in 1918. Other 
extensions were made 



River 
Tigris. It was built for 

political and strategic 

reasons, the idea being A British-built 4-6-0 locomotive, No. 104, running on the metre gauge system of the Iraq 

The tender cab is typical of the equipment of many locomotives in tropical countries. 



during 



the 



military 



operations and in the 
civil administration 

period that followed, 

-1 




to com 

munication 




e 





corn- 




Berlin and 



Baghdad by 




of 



Constantinople, Aleppo in Syria and Mosul in the North of 

and for this reason it was known as the Berlin - 





The 





r 




a 




to the 



Baghdad 
scheme. 

Rail transport was suon found to be necessary for the 
conduct of the British campaign in Mesopotamia during 
the War, River transport on the Tigris was slow and two 

were put in hand, one from Basra to 
roughly following the River Euphrates, and 
the other from Ournah, which 




an Agreement of 
1924 the Iraqi Govern- 
ment became responsible for the administration of the 
railways, but they continued in British ownership. 
rolonged negotiations with the British Government, 






er, the owners 

last transferred to 

1936, at a nominal cash value of 





Railways was 



at 



Government on 1st April, 

,000. The agreement 







for a period of 20 years from the 
date of the transfer of ownership there shall be a partly- 
British Board of Management appointed by the Iraqi 
Government, Various executive posts also are to be filled 

British officials. 



is near the supposed site of the 

the 





of Eden, alon 
is to Amarah. The 





line 



was 




to the metre 




3 ft 



* _ 



3? in. 




It 



was 



thought that it would eventu- 
ally join up with the Baghdad 

however, and it was laid 
on standard gauge sleepers so 

only one rail would have 





to be moved in the event of the 
conversion of the gauge. 
At first the Amarah line was 







The 




Railways have at 
present a total mileage of 735 

132 miles of which are 

and 603 

■ c 

The 






standard gau 

miles of metre gauge 



standard gauge now reaches 



from Baghdad to 



■ + 




i, the 



Samarra to Baiji section being 

sion of the original 



an 




a gauge of 2 ft. 6 in., 
but traffic was so heavy that it 

Was SOOn Converted to metre A 2-8-0 locomotive of German design on the standard gauge section of the "Saddat 

gauge , 



German-built Baghdad-Berlin 

Railways. The metre gauge 
runs from Basra to 

in the main 

course of the Euphrates 





At 
Hindiyah Barrage, known as 




event u 








Iraq Railways, This is one of the largest passenger engines on the system 



Al 




a 





completed from Basra to 
The use of various gauges requires some explanation 
was due to the fact that much of the rolling stock and 
material was brought from India, where different gauges 
were in use. Later the metre gauge was standardised 

for Mesopotamian use. 

Another 2 ft. 6 in. gauge line afterwards converted to 
metre gauge was that from Kut-el-Amarah to Baghdad, 



branch goes off to Kerbala, a 

holy city of one of tin- Mohammedan Sects. The metre 

gauge line also connects Baghdad with Khanaqin, a city 
situated on 





of Iraq and surrounded by 
innumerable oil wells. At Oaraghan on this line an import 



ant branch completed during the post -War period runs to 
Kirkuk, 200 miles from Baghdad, From this point a fleet 



of beautifully-appointed Rolls-Royce cars owned by the 





at 




ent link the svstem twice a week 



«* 







* 



• 



o 






4X 



r 




MECCANO MAGAZINE 




1 



with 




and 





resses at Tel Kotchek. 




een 



m Syria. 

In order to provide through rail connection 
Iraq and Europe, the Iraqi Government have determined 
to extend the standard gauge Baghdad-Raiji line to Mosul, 



their own. Every engine is sent to 




Railway Me- 



chanical Workshops 



at 



Schalchiyah 



for 



overhauls 




three years, or norm 




after having com 




e of 100,000, 



rhe Railway staff includes British, Indians and Iraqis, 



and further on 



from 



most 



of 






Mosul 



to 



the 



Iraqi- 



Syrian frontier. The lay- 
ing down of 
rail at Baiii was i 

lv 




. 



performed 



last 



November by the Prime 



Minister of 



Iraq 



111 



the 



presence of other minis 
ters, 



the 



Director- 



General of Railways and 
other high officials of 

Railway 




e Iraq 
Directorate. 



This 



176-mile 



line 



follows principally the 
German survey made 



prior to the Great War. 

In due course when 





hands. 




the official 
in British 
training of 
going on on 
scale, and 90 
per cent, of the clerical 





as w 



rell 



as traffic 



and running staff, are 



Iraqis. 



On 



the 



me 



chanical side there is 
a shortage of 
skilled 
this 




in 




i labour, but 

remedied 



course 



of 



a 



few years when 



stu- 




bei 




track 



has 



reached 



One of the oil tank wagons of the Iraq Railways. The absence of side buffers and the use of the 

fined centre buffer and coupling is characteristic of narrow gauge practice. 




til 



* 



Mosul, the four principal cities of Iraq will be connected 
by rail for the first time. It will take probably a couple of 
years to complete the construction, and to reach the 
Syrian frontier at Tel Kotchek, It will then be possible for 
travellers and tourists from London or Paris to reach 
Mosul, the ancient religious centre, Baghdad, the capital, 

Lf i*"lriilp 4- In *•%. *-*»+•* T rt+ /Ml rtTl**1 -fit fl *** 1 1 « T T3 J"» fr* w- #*i 4-Virt ''l/rtTllAn AT 



Kirkuk, the city of oil, and finally Basra, the "Venice of 









mg 
to take 

up special courses in 
engineering and man- 
agement return to 







East, 



l> 



by through railway service with only a single 



break to cross the Bosphorus by ferry. 



The 







Railways, besi 




conn 



important cities in Iraq afford tourists 



visiting the famous ancient 
ruins in 





of 
means of 




Although the Iraq Railway system is not as 
developed as the modern railway lines of European 
countries, the accommodation and facilities on the 
Iraq Railways compare very well with 




of the 

railways of other Arab countries. A fast mail service 
has been established to travel over the 353 miles be- 
tween Baghdad and Basra in 12 hours, and the whole 
system, with its developments w 
be said to be one of the greatest assets to the country. 




in 




can safely 



The 



an 




com 




Railways carry passengers with comfort 

speed, and transport all kinds of 

from livestock to 



Iraq, 



such as 



and Ur of the 
Chaldees, the birthplace of 





Houses 



j • 




t * 




with 



modern 




comfort of tourists and 

Din- 
Chal- 




passengers at 

waniyah, Ur of 

dees, now the junction for 

Nasiriyah, 



and 



Basra. 







L I 



The Railways have some 
splendid passenger 
coaches, and 
dining cars and saloons 
have been built at their 

own workshops at 



Schalchiyah 
There 







■ « > 









grains, 

During the construction 

of the Iraq-Mediterranean 

the Iraq 
Ltd., thou- 

sands of tons 

were transported over both 

the metre and standard 














e sections, to Kirkuk 



and Baiji respectively. 

Iraq has a large number 
of holy shrines at different 
places such as Kerbala, 

Na 




or 








means 



a 



considerable 



revenue to the 

through the 




ages 





mo t i ve 




loco- 

of which Road and rail transport combined! The underframe of a locomotive for work on the 



two are engine-changing 



Baljl-Tel Kotchek section loaded on to a lorry being transported to the railhead. 




Pilgrims fre- 
come from India 

or Persia, 



well as from 





One of these is at Ur Junction and the other at 

way between Baghdad and 




Qaraghan Junction, 

Kirkuk, a section in which every train has to pass through 
Table Mountain Tunnel, which is a quarter of a mile 

The maximum speed now allowed is 35 m.p.h., 

with the gradually improving conditions of the 
there is a possibility of running at 40 m.p.h. 





countries. At the holy city of Kerbala, the number of 
inhabitants and others who journey by train to celebrate 



the two large festivals falling in the year has 
to 60,000, and 




risen 







are run. 



in the near future. The locomotives used are of British 








standard 




various firms, but over 



the 



gauge sy 




German 




still hold 








There are 58 stations, the main ones being Baghdad 
West and Baghdad North 
Basra, Kirkuk 
freight rates are 
system, in order to compete both with river and 

trans 




Station at 
Passenger fares and 

of the 









THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



□□□□ 




DnnnnannnnnnnnnnnnDnnnnDannnnDnnna 

a 

□ 

a 





Military Types 



□ 

□ 
□ 

□ 

□ 

D 




N our July 1937 issue we described some of 
aircraft produced by N. V. Koolhoven 




Rotterdam, one of the pioneer Dutch aircraft companies. 
This month we deal with four more Koolhoven aircraft. 
Three of these are military types. The fourth is the FK 49. 

shown in the 

upper photo 



□nnnnnnnnnannnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnd 

give the machine a top speed of 126 m.p.h. The cruising 
speed, with the engines running at 80 per cent, of their 
full power, is 111 m.p.h. The service ceiling is 14,108 ft., 




civil 

of 



and sufficient fuel is carried for a non-stop flight of 



491 miles* The landing 




on this 
This 



grapli 
page 

machine is of 
special interest, 

as it has 





built for aerial 

survey and 
photography, 
and not merely 
adapted for 
these purposes. 

utmost 
t h eref ore 




is 46 m.p.h. 

A 



faster 
version of the 
machine 



has been 



ob- 



tained by em- 
ploying two 
D.H. "Gipsy 

Six" engines of 
205 h.p., and 
with these the 
top speed is 147 
m.p.h. and the 



range 



62 1 



The Koolhoven FK 49, designed for aerial survey and photography. Behind the cabin is a 
camera plate-holders, The illustrations to this article are reproduced by courtesy of N. V. 



The 

care 

has been taken 

to make it as 

stable and steady as possible, so as to ensure absolute 

accuracy of the surveys; and vibration of any kind 

and under any condition has been eliminated. 

o 

the interior 
reveal its special uses. The cabin seats 

can move about 




er 



The high- 

and 



speed 



greater range 



dark room in which to reload the 
Koolhoven Vlietuigen, Rotterdam. 



make 





The FK 49 does not 

twin-engined high wing monoplanes, 

arrang 







three people, and is so large that 

unhindered when at work; in the floor are openings for 




the photographic 
room, where the 
camera plate- 




Behind is a large dark 



the aeroplane for other 




prac- 
to use 




than survey work. 



It can be adapted for use as an air liner by equipping 
the cabin with seats for six passengers, or arranged as an 
air ambulance, the cabin then being provided with four 
stretchers and a seat for an attendant. 








49 has an engine mounted in the leading edge 
of each wing. The wings are built of wood, with three- 



ply covering and wooden ailerons. 




welded tubular 



fuselage 




a 








and the front portion 

• % ■ - m « 



is 



covered 



with 




holders are 

and 
and then 

back into 
cabin 



emp- 








a 



special 



through 




light 



cupboard, 
cabin has an 
excellent heating 
and 





and 



a 



telephone 

the occupants in 




touch 



with 



the 




in the cock- 
in the nose of 
the fuselage. The 




metal sheeting and 



the 




part with 



fabric. The under 
carriage is of the 

fixed, wide track 
type fitted to most 
types of the com- 
pany's civil air- 
craft . 

The three 

types of 

Koolhoven air- 
craft illustrated 
differ in 
respects. 
FK 50B, shown on 





Broadside view of the FK 50B, a twin-engined long ranije bomber. It is armed with three machine guns, one of which this Daf?e is the 

Arntnip« thA dun tilt-rot Jri the nnea nf tha fticaUrfo XT O » *" 



occupies the gun turret in the nose of the fuselage. 




transmitter 




includes dual control, and a radio 

receiver, the operator of which sits 

near the pilot. The windows are of unbreakable glass* 

panel in the windscreen with 



largest 



aeroplane 



produced by the company, and from a militarv point of 



vi e w 




and there is a 
an electric wiper. 
An aeroplane 




engaged 



graphy must fly comparatively slowly 

r\t +K^ TTLT AO, «-« i on l ntr tts^i _ 



on aerial survey and photo- 



of the FK 49 are 130 h.p. D.H 




Gipsy 




two engines 
ors,'* which 



most formidable. It is a twin-engined bomber 

a range of 715 miles. The pilot's cockpit is slightly 
above and in front of the wings, and provides the best 




possible outlook in all directions. Immediately below the 



cockpit is the station of the commander, with bomb- 
sight, bomb release and duplicate steering gear. One 
machine gun is mounted in a revolving turret in the 



>» 




* 






* 



<t 



< 



r» 



THE 




MAGAZINE 




■ 



nose of the fuselage, and a second in the top decking of 
the fuselage, where it is covered with a hinged panel 
that when open protects the gunner against the airstream. 
A third gun is installed in the bottom of the fuselage. The 

; of the three guns show that the aeroplane 
has no blind spots, and therefore can defend itself 

against at t ac k 



firing 



angle 



construction to those of the FK SOB, The fuselage 



is built on normal Koolhoven 




» 



and is covered 



with detachable three-ply panels as far as the rear 

. and with fabric from there to the stern. The 




standard power plant is an Armstrong Siddeley 350 h.p. 
"Cheetah IX," and this gives the aeroplane a top 






ter, a factor 

makes it a 

formidable 




oppo 




for 





addition 
to being effec- 



tively 



armed , 



the FK SOB has 



T 



the high maxi- 
mum speed of 
250 m.p.h. at 

436 ft. 



1 4 



} 



Bristol 

"Mercurys" of 

830 h.p. are the 




speed 



m 



P 



of 

h 



157 

a t 

The 




same 



1 s 




7,218 ft. 
cruising 

at the 
height 
142 m.p.h., and 

at 

the aero 
has a range 
513 miles. 

The Kool 
hoven FK 
shown in the 
lower illustra- 

thi 





on 



is 



s t a n d a 



r d 



The FK 51 trainer, which can be used for instruction, aerobatics, radio operation, bombing and aerial photography. 



equipment, and the two engines are fitted in the leading 
edge of the wings, in interchangeable mountings of 



welded tubular steel. Controllable-pitch airscrews are 



tion 

page, is a twe- 

seat er 

purpose 



general 



used, and 




engines are started electrically. The fuel 



tanks are between the wing spars, and there is one 



tank 



for each engine 




wings are of wood, with 




of outstanding performance in regard to speed, 
and manoeuvrability. It remains controllable at well 

this permits slow landing 




ow 




ing 




is a exeat advantage when 





three-ply covering and duralumin ailerons. The fuselage 
is of welded tubular steel, with fabric covering, and the 




i 




cut away sharply for the third gun position. 
The undercarriage is retracted into the underside 
of the engine .nacelles when the bomber is in flight. 
The second military type illustrated is the FK 51, a 
training biplane 
that has proved its 
value in most se- 
vere tests. It is un- 
usu 



in confined spaces, 
the aeroplane is 



service. The two cockpits 
are in tandem, and are under one roof so that the 
pilot and the gunner can talk to each other without 
difficulty. The 




is of 






and the 



rear 




can be folded down when necessary, to 
provide an unobstructed area for the movement of the 
rear machine gun. Both cockpits are equipped with 

gear. There are two machine guns built 

in the upper wings, 









ad apt ab le , 
and can be used for 
ordinary flying in- 
struction, for train- 
ing in aerobatics, 




for 




ing. 



photography 
or radio operation. 



The 



undercarriage 



can easily be re- 



placed 




floats, 



and the machine is 



then 



suitable 



for 



instruction in sea- 
plane 

In war the FK 51 

could render 









ated by the pilot. 

The FK 52 is a 





ane 






similar in 
construction to the 
FK 51. The fuse- 
lage is covered with 



detachable 



three- 



ply panels on the 
sides. The engine 
employed 
Bristol 



is 



a 




The Koolhoven FK 52 two-seater general purpose fighter. The two cockpits are under one roof so that the pilot tne top 



of the same power 
as that fitted in 
the FK SOB long- 
range bomber, and 

of 



and gunner can talk to each other without difficulty. 



the 




co-o 





service on reconnaissance, Army 
or as a light bomber. It has two 



aeropl ane 



is 



machine guns, one built in the upper wing and the 
other in the rear cockpit on a 



by the Koolhoven 
on the bottom of the 









sup port 




are provided 



racks. of the standard type. 



e on which to carry 




240 m.p.h. at 14,436 ft. The cruising speed is 208 m.p.h. 
at 12,467 ft., and the range at that height is 652 miles. 
The service ceiling is 30,184 ft. 



Another interesting Koolhoven aeroplane is the FK 55 



single-seater fighter. It is a sin 





high wing 



The flying qualities of this aeroplane are excellent, 






and it is possible to put 
whole ran^e of modern 





loaded, through the 
It is a staggered 
biplane, the upper wing being slightly forward of the 
lower one. The wings are of equal span and of similar 



monoplane, and a novel feature is the use of two airscrews 
that rotate in opposite directions. This eliminates the 
adverse effect of airscrew torque, and makes the aero- 

. The FK 55 is 



plane very 




armed with a cannon 



and easy to 






fires through the airscrew 
shaft, and either two or four machine guns, which 
fire outside the radius of the airscrew. 



654 




MECCANO MAGAZINE 




• 






L.M.S. Winter Accelerations 

With the introduction of the new winter 

timetable, the L.M.S. have inaugurated 
the most drastic Midland Division speed-up 

on record and the most important timetable 
revision since grouping. This speed-up has 

made possible by the introduction 

of the latest 4-6-0 locomotives, and is the 
outcome of trials that took place over 
these routes last April and were described 
the June "M.M." Cuts up to 40 miu. 
per train have been effected in the running 
times between St, Pancras, 





the same degree of 





in 



ration 

between these points and Leeds and 
Bradford as is achieved in the southern 

The overall 




section of the main line, 
journey times between St. Pancras, Leeds 
and Bradford benefit considerably, 
ever, by the sweeping accelerations that 

have been introduced. For instance, the 
maximum saving in journey time by the 

3.30 p.m. from St. Pancras to Sheffield 

is 20 min., and there are similar savings 
of 21 min. and 24 min, to Leeds and 






Second Birthday of "The Silver Jubilee" 

On 30th September "The Silver Jubilee/' 
the first L.N.E. R. streamline train, complet- 
ed two years of service. During that time it 
made 988 single journeys 




King's 

Cross and Newcastle, conveying 135,370 
passengers and covering 263,7*84 miles. The 



Bradford respectively. Eight other north- 



total distance has been regularly covered at 

an average speed of 67, tS m.p.h., while at 

least 75,000 miles have been covered at over 

80 m.p.h., and on 

m.p.h. has been reached. 



several occasions 

if 



The 



100 

Silver 



Leicester, 

Sheffield, Leeds 






am, 

Brad- 







The express service be- 
tween St. Pancras and Man- 
chester (Central) via Leices- 
ter and Derby has been 
completely reorganised, the 
fastest overall time by this 

route being reduced by 20 
min. northbound to 3 hr. 35 
min. This is 5 min, faster 

- 

than the fastest of pre- War 
days; it includes two stops, 
at Leicester and Derbv 



respectively, however, 






one 
new 



the previous 
was made with 
stop at Leicester, 
restaurant car express leaves 
Manchester (Central) at 
6.20 p.m. and arrives at St. 

Pancras at 9.57 p.m, r with 
stops at Derby and Leicester 



« t 




it 




a 



later 



service from Manchester to 

» 

London and relieves the 




maintained a 

wonderful record for punc- 

and more than half 
the arrivals at King's Cross 
and Newcastle have bee 




n 



from one to five minutes 

early. 

One of the most remark- 
able features of "The Silver 



" train is that al- 
though there are five engines 






the ser vi ce 
there is only one set of seven 
coaches in existence and this 
set has been used almost 
continually since the train 
was first introduced in 1935. 
The success of "The Silver 
Jubilee" led directly to the 
new streamlined high-speed 

trains introduced this year, 



the 



## 



Coronation 



1 1 



between 









heavily -loaded Wester n 
Division 



a 



express 



The 



Here she comes!" Boys near Harringay interested in the passing of the L.N.E.R. "Coronation* 
express, hauled by No. 4498 "Dominion of Canada/ 1 Photograph by Mr. W, S. Garth, Preston* 



London and Edinburgh, and 
the "West Hiding Limited," 
between Bradford, Leeds 
and London. 

On 23rd September, prior 

in regular 






for 



Comet," which leaves London 

w 

Euston at 5.45 p.m. 

neW non-stop service has been intro- 
duced for business men travelling between 
Sheffield and London. The up train leave? 
Sheffield at 10.43 a.m. and the down train 

- - , ■ , 



leaves St. Pancras at 5.10 



each 



covering the 158£ miles in 2 hr, 52 min. 
Both Leicester and Nottingham have 
series of non-stop expresses to and from 
London scheduled at over 60 m.p.h. start- 

M '- 

to-stop at various times of the day. This 
distribution of the fastest services through- 
out the day is one of the notable features 
of the new L.M.S. timetable, which show 
a total of 62 trains with start-to-stop 



will 



' 



bound services to Yorkshire citie 
benefit from 5 min. to 1 5 min. 

An interesting feature of the new time- 
table is the provision of a 172-min. non-stop 
service from London to Sheffield by the 
down "Yorkshireman," while the corres- 

* .1 



■ ■ 



ponding 



«P 



train 



now 



travels 



via 



average speeds of 60 m.p.h. or more. These 

new high-speed trains cover an average 
daily mileage of 6,145, as compared with 



the 29 trains and 2,6'Xl miles per day last 



Nottingham. Anglo-Scottish services by 
the Midland route are also speeded up 
and the "Thames-Forth Express" now 
arrives at St. Pancras 38 min. earlier 
than previously. 

It is possible that the services between 
Bristol and Leeds via Birmingham, Derby 

, and between Leeds and 
Carlisle, Dumfries and Kil- 



to 

service on the 27th of that 

month, the "West Riding 



Limited" made a trial run between Bradford 
and Barkston South junction. The maxi- 
mum speed recorded was over 93 m.p.h. -on 
the outward run. The engine was No. 4495 
"Golden Fleece," one of the two streamlined 

"Pacifies" allocated specially to this train. 

the other being No. 4496 "Golden Shuttle" 



The 



West Biding Limited" consists of 










winter. Only six years ago there were no 
60 m.p.h. trains on the L.M.S. system 

The numerous speed restrictions 
force north of Trent and Nottingham 



marnock will be accelerated a 'so as a result 

of the tests that were carried between these 
places on four successive days last month. 
Standard locomotives and rolling stock 
were used for the trials which were run 







to schedules somewhat faster than the 

express timings at present in force over 
the routes concerned. 



four twin articulated units making eight 
coaches in all with a total weight of 278 ton 

■ rat mm ■•« ■ ■ . 




The train is similar in 




to 



em 

the "Coronation," but there is no "beaver- 
tail" streamline observation saloon, such 
as is characteristic of the latter. The 
reversal of the train at Leeds (Central) 
makes this impracticable. 

The external finish of the train is 

the same as that of the "Coronation/' 
dark Garter blue being used for the 

below the windows and a lighter 

above, with aluminium paint for 

roofs, and raised stainless stee) 

The underframes are black and 
the locomotives have red wheels. 





a 



t 



u 



i 






THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 






655 



t 



o 



-e 



r 






Fast Running by a "Hunt" Class 4-4-0 

The majority of duties entrusted to the 

D49" class 4-4-0s of the L.N.E.R., both 

the piston valve type, named after 

and of the R.C. poppet valve 



ti 

of 




series, are in the nature 

of "intermediate' 1 

workings rather than 

main line 



S.R, to Lay More Long Rails 

The track in PoUiill Tunnel has been 
relaid with 1 80 ft. welded rails, of the type 
already laid in Merstham Quarry Tunnel. 
Other repair work is being carried out at 



The Railway Handbook, 1937-8 

A reliable source of facts and figures 
relating to the railway systems of Great 
Britain and Ireland is always useful, and 
this description is certainly merited by the 



1937-8 issue of 




high-s 

turns. A notable excep- 
tion in this respect is 

the 9 a.m. Leeds-Glas- 
gow express 

hauled 
"D49" 




is 




by a 



as far as New 



castle. 



370 



On a recent trip No. 

m 



"The 



most a 




Rufford, 




Beanland of Neville 

Hill shed, Leeds, made 

a very spirited run from 

York to Newcastle. 
The load was one of 
eight coaches, 271 tons 
tare and 285 tons with 



■ 



passengers 



and 



lug- 




York was left 
3 min. late, but over 

the faintly rising length 





The 

Its 




rra 






Northallerton 



was re 




no 

in 



spite of a steady aver- 
age of 62 to 67 m.p.h. 



One of the "Rockets," a series of six new Diesel-electric streamlined trains just introduced on the Chicago, 

Rock Island and Pacific Railroad for service in the Middle West. The trains are finished externally in stainless 
steel and include lounge car and dining accommodation. The locomotive develops 1,200 h.p. Photograph by 

courtesy of the Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railroad. 



After passing Northallerton, [30 miles, in 
32 J min. speed rose to 6$ on the level at 




rise 



Danby Wiske t and the 1 in 
to Eryholme Junction was mounted at a 
steady 64 k m.p.h. Touching 75 down Croft 
bank, "The Rufford" was through Darling- 



ton, 44 miles, 
and the rising gr 




min. at 69 m.p.h. 
to Ay cliff e taken at 




the excellent minimum speed of 57 m.p.h., 
but a fast run down past Ferryhill with a 
top 

the usual slack at Croxdale, on this 
occasion to 55 m.p.h. Nevertheless Durham, 
66 miles, was passed in 67| min. at the 



of 73 m.p.h. was cut short by 



Hilden borough. To allow these important 

engineering works to be put in hand it Was 

necessary to close the line between Knock- 
holt and Tonbridge on Sundays during last 
month. Electric trains between London and 

■ 

Sevenoaks via Orpington ran according to 
the 



96 pages include a great 
deal of valuable in- 
formation, but it is not 
merely a statistical re- 
cord for it gives details 

of general interest about 

each of the 
companies, the Irish 
railways and the Lon- 
don Passenger Trans- 
port Board. Such de- 
"s as fastest runs, 
longest tunnels, great- 
est altitudes, steepest 
gradients and so on are 

included, with notes on 
locomotives, carriages, 
wagons, permanent 
way and signalling. 

A brief chronology of 
British Railways is an 
interesting feature, in 

comparisons are 

made with the 

of other 

order to cover such 

developments as the 






electrification of steam 

There is a good index, a study of which 



supports the claim of the publishers that the 
"Handbook" forms the only source ol 




but terminated at and 
returned from Knoekholt Station. Between 
Knockholt and Sevenoaks a bus service 

■ r . — . ■ 

was instituted. 



reference at the low price of 2/6 in which it 
is possible to obtain the information given 



in it. It is published 



Publishing 




Street, Westminster, 




Railway 
Tothill 



S.W., 






Central London Tube Extension 






usual 




very slow speed. 

train 



Carnforth Station to be Improved 

The station at Carnforth, known as the 

to the Lake District, is to be 



The G.W.R. and the 










completely modernised. The scheme includes 



junction are to extend the 

London" electric line to Ruwiip, a 

Mm , * 

of eight miles, 



L.P.T.B. in con- 

"Central 




was now 




less 






late, 




a 







alter experi- 



encing a severe slowing 

for pitfall troubles near 
Plawsworth, there 
came a brilliant finish 
into Newcastle. Ches- 
ter-le- Street was passed 



m.p,h., 




at 71 

which "The Rufford" 

raced away to no less 
than 77| m.p.h. at 





so that the 
80 miles from York to 
Newcastle were com- 
pleted in 82 J min., 
H min. early, despite 

the late start of 3 min. 

The schedule time 

for this distance is 

87 min., the fastest of 

the 





nee 

a lurther extension 
three miles will 

be made to 
Denham. The exten- 
sion is to leave the 
existing Ealing and 
Shepherds Bush line 



near North Acton by 
means of the burrow- 
ing junction. 

The widening oi the 
G.W.R. line 
to four tracks between 





North Acton and Ruis- 

lip and possibly to 
Denham 

allow a 




on, 




proportion ol 
trains from 
"Central London" 



the 



the 




to be run over it. This 

place 




Northolt, 




, excepting of 
course that of "The 
Silver Jubilee/' 
bv Mr. O. S. Nock. 



The "Simplon-Oftent Express" near St. Deni* on the Northern Railway of France. The locomotive is No. 3. 

one of the remarkably efficient VSupc^Pacifics." Photograph by Mr, G. F. Fenino, of Abion, France* 








run was recorded 

I am ■ 






Ruislip, 

Greenford 

and intermediate sta- 
tions in direct com- 
munication with the 



The L.N.E.R. "East Anglian 

Two "Sandnngham" class 



ft 




ves 




have been streamlined for service on the 
'East Anglian," which runs between 

(Liverpool Street) and Norwich. 
These are No. 2859 and No. 2870. formerly 
"Norwich City" and "Manchester City" 
which have been renamed "East Anglian" 
and 



the construction of a new platform 890 ft. 

the raising of existing plat 



in 



length 



forms, the 

and 




boxes Nos. 



provision of new carriage 

the replacement of signal 



1 and 2. 






When the improvements have been 



it 



City of London" respectively. 



carried out it is antici 




that better 



services will be provided from Carnforth 
to the Furness area generally, including 
Barrow-in-Furness and the seaside resorts 
of Morecambe, Heysham and Grange- 
over-Sands. 




West End and the City. 

In addition to the burrowing junction 
at North Acton there will be a fly-over 
junction on the G.W.R. Castle bar loop 
line at Greenford. A car depot of modern 
type will be 

and Ruislip Gardens Station, 

* * ♦ ♦ 

L.M.S. class 5P5F 4-6-0s built by con- 
are in service up to No. 5416. 
Nos. 147-155 of the 2-6-2 passenger tank 
engines built at Derby are also in service. 






6 5 6 




MECCANO MAGAZINE 



□□□DDDO 




Europe now belongs to Denmark, where a great new 

1 • • 1 1 ri* 11 it -r r * 



structure two miles 
Christian IV on 26th 




was -formally opened 





Kin g 



of this year. The new 
bridge crosses the Storstrdfn, the channel between the 



islands of Falster and Masnedo, and its approaches bring 
its total length to 2 J miles. It is a long slender steel 
structure, carried on 4S great concrete piers. British 

in its 








engineers and British steel played a great 
construction, which was one of the greatest engineering 
feats of modern times, for it was erected by Dorman 
Long and Co. Ltd., Middlesbrough, the builders of 
Sydney Harbour Bridge and many other famous structures. 

There is great 
need for the build- 



railway line. It has 50 spans altogether and rises gently 

from the abutments at each end to three wide spans in the 

middle of the channel under which shipping can pass. The 
length of the middle span is 393 ft. 8 in. t and that of each 
of the two on its flanks is 295 ft. 3 in. The largest of the 
three gives a clearance of 85 ft. for the masts and 
of vessels making use of the channel, and the others are 
almost as high, their clearance being only 2 ft. less. 
The remaining spans are alternately of 189 ft, and 204 ft. 

The greatest depth of the Storstrom is 46 ft., although 
the average is only 23 ft. The rise and fall of the tide 
usually is only 8 in. to 13 in., and its greatest variation is 
6i ft., so that this gave rise to no trouble during construc- 
tion. The current 






ing 



of 




giant 



m 



Den 



mark. That coun- 






try consists 
largely of islands, 

from 
and 



separated 



each 



other 



from the mainland 
by wide arms of 
the sea that make 

communication 












hagen, the capital, 
is on Zealand, the 
largest 



of 



these 




and until 
years ago 




sweeping through 



the 



channel 



is 




sometimes 

but it also did not 
seriously hinder 
work on the 

bridge. Steel 

and 
sheet piling 
were used to cut 
off the water from 
the sites on 

the 













and the abutments 

at the ends were 
to be built. The 

water inside was 
then removed and 



Was Comparatively A view from me air oi the Storstrom Bridge, the longest in Europe, stretching from the island of Masnedo to Falster 



the 



foundations 




to reach 



in the distance. The total length of the bridge is 2\ miles. The illustrations to this article are repr 




I < 



of Dorman 





ean countries, as the waterways between the 
islands could only be crossed by ferry. The channels were 

communications in 
to overcome the 



ong and Co. Ltd., Middlesbrough. 



uced by courtesy 



laid. These were 



particularly troublesome to 
Denmark. Efforts have been 






difficulties by means of specially constructed train ferries. 
~ given excellent service, but time necessarily 

is lost in shunting trains on or off the ferries, and in 
winter storms may hold up communication for long 




bridges at suitable points 

ions, not only to railway 

traffic but also to travel by road. - 

The new bridge forms part of a scheme to improve the 
journey by road or rail between Copenhagen and conti- 
nental centres, such as Berlin, Paris and Hook of Holland, 
the port for Great Britain. It links two of the islands on 
this route, and a smaller bridge has been constructed 
across the channel between Masnedo and Zealand. Now 

the only place in this route where it is necessary 
to cross by boat is between the south coast of Falster and 
the German mainland. This sea passage is 25 miles 




in width, and is co\ 

traffic . 






by 



d 






also 



The Storstrom Bridge is wide enough to carry a 



roadway 18 ft. 4 J in. wide and a path for pec 




and 




that measures 8 ft. 



2\ in 



as well as a single 






com 



sunk well into a bed of firm clay that 

of the channel at a depth of 20 ft. to 25 ft. 

The piers and abutments are of reinforced concrete, 
and the actual course of construction varied according to 



their 

■ 

cofferdam of steel 




The abutments were built up 




a 




pilin 



fT 

6* 




this was left in 



position as a protection against undercurrents. The piers 
rest on foundations consisting of huge oval slabs of 




and they also are protected 




m 



concrete 10 ft. 

currents by steel sheet piles. They are of three different 



sizes. 




that support the navi 




spans 



in the 



middle of the river are much larger than the others, and 
the smallest are in the shallow water at the ends of 
the bridge. 



These piers were built in cofferdams, but an ingenious 



scheme was 




ed out 




the engineers for the con- 



struction of the others. Each was built with the aid of a 
special standard unit consisting of a floating oval steel 
staging, fitted with water tanks so that it could be raised 



or lowered by pumping water out or in. Thus it formed a 



mo 




c 




erdam. From it steel sheet piles were driven 
to form a wall round the foundations, and it carried 
pumps to keep dry the workings inside the steel walls, 
together with the appliances needed for building the lower 
segments of the pier under construction. As soon as each 



a 



o 



o 



- 



THE 




MAGAZINE 



657 




* 



« 



pier 



reached a certain 




the unit was removed, 



and the rest of the construction carried out in the 

ordinary manner. 

Winter conditions in the Baltic Sea are very severe, 

and pack ice is then encountered in the Storstrom. 

In the shallows this may be forced up to heights of 

22 ft., 

exerts 

pressure 




to the slipway to wait for the next span. 

crane used in this work is one of the most powerful 

500 tons. It is 

lifting towers are 



in the world, and is 






it 



enormous 

against 



any obstruction in 



its 




For this 



reason special pro- 
tection has been 
given to the great 

piers 



by 




in 




them with granite 
to a depth of 8 ft. 
below the surface 
of the water. Cut- 
waters also 




been 



erected 



to 



provide further 




scouring 



by currents. 

Nearly the 
whole of the steel 





of 

built on two large barges, and 

150 ft. in height. 
The three navigation spans are steel plate girders, 

rein forced 
arches. Owing to 
their great length 
and weight, it was 
impossible to lift 
them directly into 

Instead 

each was built up 
in two eaual sec- 




tions. A huge tim- 
ber trestle, resting 



on 



a 



group 



of 




specially 

was placed 
e centre of 
each span in turn, 
where it acted as 






The Soil -ion Moating crane lowering a suspension span into place during the building of the Storstrom bridge. In 

position it is supported by the cantilever arms of the adjacent spans. 



used in the construction of the bridge was Dorman 

tensile "Chromador Steel/* which has a 

corrosion. The steelwork was made 










in 



len gths 



up to 45 




in specially chartered steamers, w 





delivered it to 
on the island of Masnedo. There the 

up in readiness for placing in 





an erection 

spans were 

on the piers of the 

The 47 spans leading up to the three wider navi- 
gation spans in the middle are steel plate girders and are 
of two kinds, known 
as anchor and sus- 



halves 
of the girder span 
were then rolled 
out on the slip- 
ways and towed to the site in the usual manner, the 

crane depositing each with one end on the 



floating 





were 



other on the trestle. The two 
ler over the trestle, and this was removed 
to the next navigation span to enable a similar operation 
to be carried out there. The construction of this section 

: 

of the bridge was completed by building up the arches 



piece 




piece from the 




of the 



s 



pan 



pension 



spans 



re- 



spectively. 





The steelwork was left to weather for 12 months, and 
was then sand-blasted and given three coats of paint. 

Three structures call- 
ed 

Iers," run under the 
girders of the bridge 



Each 



the 
anchor 



* 



bridge 

span 

two 



adj acent piers, and is 



rests 



o n 



so 




that canti- 



arras 




lever 

from it to a distance 
of 30 ft. at each end. 



arm s 




These 

supports for the sus- 
pension spans, which 

do not rest 

on the piers 




signing 
work 

to 



this 



steel 






for 



use 



when 



m- 




are to be 

made or the steel- 
work is to be re- 




n arrow 



between 





way 

islands of Masnedo 

and Zealand is span- 
by the smaller 

bridge seen in the 




foreground 

illustration 



of 
on 



the 

th<- 

This 





care had 



The foundation and piers ot toe image unaer construction. The hrst steel span has been erected. 



opposite page, 
forms a continuation 



of 



the 






Storstrom 




taken to allow sufficiently for the 




changes 



in temperature to be expected, for it is very cold indeed 
in the Baltic Sea in winter. 






An unusual plan was followed in placing these girder 
spans in position. Each was built up in the erection 

yard 

rolled 

the shore. There it was picked up by a huge floating 

crane, which was then towed out to the site of the 




referred to, and when completed was 

took it well away 






bridge and manoeuvred until the span could be lowered 



gently into place. The crane was then 





Bridge. Provision had to 



be made for the passing of 



shipping along the waterway under it, and the bridge 
therefore has a bascule span giving a navigation opening 

82 ft. wide. 

The steelwork for this bridge also was made by Dorman 
Long and Co. Ltd., but was built up ready for assembly 




William 




and 




o. Ltd., 





the machinery for raising and lowering the 
lifting span. The total weight of steel in the two bridges 
is about 30,000 tons, of which some 9,000 tons were 

required for the smaller. 



658 



THE 







MAGAZINE 











An Island in the Sky 

Five men recently climbed to the top of a 

plateau in the Grand Canyon of Arizona 

probably has been isolated for 

thousands of years, perhaps since the Great 
Ice Age. It is known as Shiva's Temple and 
rises 1,200 ft. above the floor of the canyon. 
Its sides are very steep, and its summit is 

so comple 





off that it has been 
described as an island in the sky. Its 
surface has an area of about a square 
mile, and is so rugged that it is impossible 
for an aeroplane to land upon it. 

It was thought that the summit of 
Shiva's Temple might be a miniature 
"lost world," resembling on a more 
limited scale the one described in the late 






Dr. Conan Doyle J s romance* in which 

creatures such as the ptero- 
dactyl and various dinosaurs surv' 

discoveries of this kind 






No 

were expected in the Grand Canyon, but 
it was possible that the plateau might 
yield small reptiles and mammals that 
had survived from a previous age, 
that might be very d i ffere nt in appearance 
and habits from those of the outer 
world. Dr. Anthonv. the leader of the 







party, remained for several days on the 



plateau with one companion. 




food , 



water and other supplies for them were 
dropped by parachutes from aeroplanes 
flying over the plateau. Many small 
animals such as wood rats, white-footed 
mice, rabbits and squirrels, were found, 
and there was evidence that deer and 
larger forms of animal life at one time 
lived on the plateau, although no living 
specimens were found. The most interest- 
ing news, however, is that stone arrow- 
heads and implements have been dis- 
covered. This may indicate that in some 
by-gone age a primitive tribe of human 
beings inhabited the island in the sky, 
which may have been cut off from the rest 
of the world at a comparatively recent date. 

Lost Worlds of the Grand Canyon 










When Shiva's Tern pie has been thorough- 

■ 

the expedition will make an 

"Wotan's Throne." This is a 

world," separated from the 




attempt on 



second 



i l 




north rim of the canyon W a chasm 
1,200 ft. across. Its sides are very 




cipitous, and it is by no means certain that 
the proposed ascent is possible. There are 
several other similar platen ux, as the 
photograph on the opposite page of the 
Grand Canyon suggests, and all may yield 
interesting discoveries. 

The fact that these plateaux have lot .-;o 
long been shrouded in mystery serves to 





remind us that the world has not 

quite so thoroughly as is 
imagined. There are still regions of which 
the White Man knows very little. For 
instance, few explorers have yet succeeded 



in penetrating the tropical forests that 
cover the Matto Grosso Plateau in Brazil. 
There unknown tribes and strange animals 
may well exist, of which the civilised 



there is a regular service Uy boat from 

on Lake Albert. 




The trip is remarkable not only for the 
magnificence of the Falls, but also for the 
game that can be seen on the way. Mr. 
B. A. Soltau, of Plymouth, a reader of the 

"M.M." 



who recently made the trip 

writes of travelling in "a small launch 
lined with steel as a protection again 






In this we chugged 



river, our eyes 




to 




the banks which were alive with every 
sort of animal. At first the sides were 

clogged with papyrus, in which dwelt 
every variety of river bird, ibis, duck, 
storks of every colour and description 

waded or flew around us. 

■ 

"As the river widened bushes and then 



trees appeared on the banks. Amongst 
them moved herds of buck, and close to 
the water lay crocodiles basking, their 
cruel jaws agape, their eyes glittering and 

cold. The first collection of these we saw 




a sens 










g we 

were almost tired of the sight of them* 
they were so numerous. It was the same 
with the hippos. The water seemed to be 

alive with them and they would con- 



tin u 




be 




ing up to inspect us 



The real thrill was the elephants. We 
must have seen in all four or five herds 




drink, 
along, 



« ■ 



coming down to the water 

moving slowly, and majesti 

their trunks continually waving at the 

flies that annoyed them. 

The Swiftest Creature in the World 

Naturalists in Brazil are reported to 

have discovered a remarkable fly that is 
said to he the world's fastest 
creature. It is half an inch in len 



% 







ing 



our 




The Murchison Falls, Uganda, on the Nile. The surrounding 

district is remarkable for game, and an account of the animals that 

can be seen is given on this page. Photograph by B. A. Soltau. 

world knows nothing. Further north in 



the same continent British Guiana, though 



appearance 

bee, and is believed capable of a s 



in flight of 





m.p.h., or nearly 1,200 ft. 



per 



sec. It seems almost 







it is part of the Empire, has not yet been 



should move so 
quickly. It could fly from London to 
New Zealand between sunrise and sunset, 
and would take little more than a day 




surve 




while 



secrets 



of 
the 



many 
ancient civilisations still he buried in 






jungles of South America, the scene 
of Conan Doyle's lost world. 

A Paradise for Game 

The illustration on this page shows the 
Murchison Falls in Central Africa, where 

- 

the waters of the Nile swerve through a 
narrow channel and plunge over a precipice 
several hundred feet in height before resum 



to fly round 
It would 
the 





to 




how 




human 
and 



eye 
it would 



was measured, for 
could not follow it in 



be seen 



only 



ing their leisurely 




nean 




progress 
Until 



towards the 

the 




Falls were almost unaccessible, but to-day 



as a 

blur. It could scarcely be heard coming 
towards an observer on the look out 
for it, for it moves with a speed almost 
equal to that of sound, and it would 

arrive at practically the same time as 
the whirr of its wings! Possibly its speed has 

been exaggerated. The warble fly was once 
credited with a speed of 700 m.p.h., but 
actually does not exceed 40 m.p.h. 






- 












THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



659 



Strange American Farms 






One of the most interesting animals in 
the world is the chinchilla, a friendly little 
creature of the rodent family about the 
size of a guinea pig. Its home is in the South 
American Andes, 
8,000 ft. above sea level, 
where it lives in bur- 
rows. It is a strict vege- 
tarian, and in its own 

was once very 






had failed to reach the sealed compartment 
of the queen bee, the life in the hive con- 
tinued, and the damage was soon repaired. 

A Strange Deep Sea Creature 

A sack throated whip-tail was recently 



one of these, said to have been 30 ft. long 
and estimated to weigh 10 tons, was 

hooked in the Firth of Clyde from a small 

dinghy, and towed the boat more than 




our 




ores are for 





t 





use 




cou 

unpopular 

the amount of damage 
it did to crops. Indians 
therefore hunted it and 
it became comparative- 
ly rare.- Now all this is 
changed, for its beauti- 
ful soft pearl-grey fur 

is highly valued, and is 

in such demand among 
furriers in Europe and 
America that in the 

States special 
farms are devoted to 
rearing the chinchilla. 
The animals on these 
farms were made to feel 
at home in 
only with the greatest 





and 



three 



difficulty, 

years were spent in 

them from 




part free from danger- 



ous 
these 





some of 



are 



f o u n d 




in 
far 



certain areas 

. 4 ■ 

distant. For instance, 

■ _ 

shoals of fierce blue 

sharks cause trouble to 




about 



100 




miles to the west of the 
Scilly Isles by 

fish caught in the nets, 

often destroying a whole 
catch. 






The basking shark is 
fairly common ofl the 
west coast of Ireland 



during 



the 



su m iner 



months. It is so named 






"i 



because of its habit of 

sunning itself on 

s ur f ace . 




e 




xt to the 
whale shark, which may 
reach a length of 70 ft 
it is the largest 






transferring 



A scene in the Grand Canyon of the Colorado. One of the steep-sided plateaux of the kind referred to on the 

opposite page can be seen. 



exceeding 
40 ft. in length, with a 

weight of over 8 .000 lb. 



their mountain homes to the farms. There 



they are 
huts. Great 




very carefully in wooden 
utions are taken to keep 



them in healthy condition, and visitors 
must walk through shallow pits containing 
sterilising solutions in order to avoid 
carrying infectious diseases to them. 

Another curious American farm at 
Comfort, Texas, the only one of its kind in 
the world, is devoted to the rearing of the 
armadillo, a peculiar animal found through- 
out Central and South America. 
The largest armadillo has a 
length of 3 ft. but the smallest 
kinds sometimes measure no 



discovered floating helplessly on the 
surface of the Atlantic, Very few specimens 
of this creature have been found. It is an 



It 




as a 






■ 



inhabitant of the Atlantic Ocean, in which 
it lives at depths of about 1,000 fathoms. 

with slender curved 





Its jaws are provi 

teeth and it can distend its body to s 
an extent that it is capable of swallowing 
large fishes. The one found in the Atlantic 
had been too venturesome in this respect 
for it had been choked as a result of 



disconcerting 



habit of "breaching," that is of hurling its 

vast bulk clear out of the water, falling with 
a tremendous splash that can be heard for 



miles. A small boat near a breaching 




may ea 




be capsized. 



Sharks have considerable commercial 
value, and factories for dealing with them 
have long been established in South Africa, 
Australia and America, and more recently 
in Norway, They are a valuable source of oil 

that can be used not only as a food, but also 



in the manufacture of paint 



a. 







more than 5 in. In appearance 
they resemble miniature tanks, 

for they are covered with two 

heavy bony plates. Although they 
ve only short legs, they can 

bury themselves very rapidly in 
the ground. Some specimens also 
find protection by rolling them - 
selves into a tight round ball, 
completely concealing their head 
and feet, and presenting to any 
enemy only a thick hard mass 

resembling a cannon ball. 

are reared on the farm chiefly for 

their plates, the material of 

which can be manufactured into 

lamp shades, combs and 
many other articles. 

War in the Insect World 

During the last week in Sep-' 





tember 




was war in the 



insect world at Har borne in 
Warwickshire. The trouble began 




Their 










can be mad- into 
ornaments, and their bones into 

sers, and a method of 
tanning shark skin recently dis- 
covered yields a leather that i 
used in the production of fancv 

M- _- 

goods of all kinds. 

A Valuable E 

An accidental blow by a 
labourer's pick has caused a 
considerable amount of trouble 
to a New Zealand scientist, who 

mon ths has been 
engaged in repairing the damage 

caused by it. The labourer, who 
was employed in quarrying, 
com 

eg^ 






^ which was 
ground where he 

When the 



shattered a strange 

fa * -ft r J ■ 




in the 



was at w 





fragments 



were ex- 



amined, 

belonging 

that is now extinct 






were identified as 
the moa, a bird 




moa was the largest bird 

lived 





a swarm of wasps 
a bee-hive and attempted to 
carry off the honey. The 



Antelope in the Nemiskamo National Park, Canada. These creatures once roamed ireely 
in North America. They are among the shyest of animals, being more timid than deer, 

but become trustful in captivity. 



ever known to have 

the earth. Some specimens 

said to have been 



on 




as 




as a 




bees de- 
fended their home, and the resulting battle 

continued for 10 hours. The fight was 

by smoking out the hive, but by 




that time nearly 7,000 bees had been killed. 
The wasps driven off soon attacked another 
hive and 




in their assaults until 
practically everyone had been exterminated 

people living in the district, who 
destroyed their nests. The bees were seri- 
ously reduced in numbers, but as the wasps 





trying to swallow a fish that was con- 
siderably larger than itself. 

Sharks in British Waters 

■ 

Much has been heard recently of sharks 
in British waters, which seem this year to 
have been invaded by this fish. On several 
occasions small boats have been attacked by 
mystery fish that have turned out to be 
basking sharks, which are usually regarded 
as harmless. In the last week in September 




It could 













fly, fot 



■ 



it had no wings, and it was hunted by 
Maoris until it was exterminated about 

the middle of the 18th century 

The same fate overtook many other birds 
that were without the power of flight, The 
great auk was once common in Northern 

and in North America. Though 
swift and active in the water it was clumsy 
on land, and as it could neither fly nor run 
it was easily killed with clubs. It became 

extinct about 1840. 




660 




MECCANO MAGAZINE 




□ 



The 




Weir on the Neckar 



□ 




THERE axe many instances in which the level of a 
stream has to be regulated by means of a weir or 
similar contrivance. For example this may be necessary 

to prevent flooding, or for maintaining a level suitable for 
navigation . 

use of a 
weir is in hoard- 
ing supplies for 






can be withdrawn 




the water to allow the stream free 








irrigation 



pur 



poses or for the 

production 
of hydro-electric 
power. In many 

parts of the world 
rainfall is 
equally distribut- 

quantity 



and to allow accumulations of drift wood and 
other debris to disperse. In the lower illustration can 
be seen the machinery by which the weir is operated. 

The weir con- 

ts of three 

masonry piers, 

with openings 

100 ft in width 
between them. In 



un 



in 



ed 



throughout the 
year. The supply 

of water for any 




si 




each of these a 



steel 



drum 



is 



mounted. At each 
end of each drum 

is a pinion that en- 
gages with a rack 



lixed in 





pier 




it. 
steel flat-linked 

chain is wound 



DlirpOSe Can then The drum weir aciuss ine River Neckar, at Guttenbach, Germany, which is described on this page. This illustration FOUUd the drum 
f r . -. and that below are reproduced bv courtesv of I ohn Holland and Co. Ltd.. London. ■, ,-, . •■ I 



be 



maintained 



and the other end 



only by storing it in some manner when it is plentiful, and 
doling it out in the dry season. 




the en- 
gineer has been compelled to exercise his ingenuity in 
impounding and regulating the flow of water in rivers 
and lakes. The usual plan is to erect a masonry barrier, 
such as a dam or weir, against the upper side of which 



of the chain is 




to the barrel of a winding which, so 



the water accumulates until it reaches the required 
height. Any excess of 
water is permitted to 

escape 



that the drum is made to turn by operating the winch. The 
pinions at its ends then climb up the raeks,thus raising the 
drum and freeing the opening for the discharge of the water. 
The two outer opening^ of the weir are fitted with drums 

that is the chief 







gates provided or 
over the top of the dam 

itself. 

The manner in which a 
dam or weir is construct- 
ed depends on the con- 
ditions existing at the 

is to 



of the usual type. The winged 

feature of the Guttenbach weir is in the middle. The wing 

attached to the drum is 
hinged, and it can be 
moved up or down to in- 
crease the effective height 
of the barrier and thus to 
regulate the level of the 
water without raising the 
drum from its lowest posi- 
tion. This wing is a steel 



flap 5 ft in height, and is 





point where 
thrown across the river. 
There are many different 

use, and one of 

and most in- 
teresting of these is one 




that 




been erected 



across the River Neckar 






at Guttenbach in Ger 



many 



This 



weir 



built to the plans 



was 

of 




moved 




of 



the drum. When lowered 
it lies flush with the sur- 
face of the drum. In use it 

gives more accurate con- 
trol over the water level. 
The plant includes two 
winches, one of which 
operates the drum itself, 



while the 




controls 




rupp Grusonwerk 



The winch mechanism for operating the drums and regulating wing of the Guttenbach Weir, 




Germany, whose agents in this 
Rolland and Co. Ltd., 




country 

There are several varieties of drum weirs, but the special 
feature of the Guttenbach weir, which is described as of 
the winged-drum type, is that the level of the water stored 



the raising and lowering 
of the wing. Both winches 

to 



are driven bv the same motor, which can be cou 

— — 

either of them at will. The wing is operated by three wire 




behind it can be set without 




the main body, or 



drum, of the weir itself. The weir is shown in the upper 
illustration on this page, and is designed so that the gates 



ropes, two of which are employed for lifting and one for 
lowering. All three ropes are run from the rope drum over 
idler sheaves to a main sheave keyed to a hollow shaft 
that is in line with the axle of the drum. 

This article is based on information given in the 
V.D.I., Berlin, Vol. 81 , and "Engineering Progress," Berlin. 








THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 







□ 



of 




Famous Ocean Greyhound 



□ 

□ 





HE passing of a famous Atlantic liner always arouses 
keen regrets. In recent 



such well-known 
vessels as the "Doric" the "Adriatic" and even 






last time on her way to Southampton. 



<f 



Mauretania 



it 



f 



ship 



the 
that 



America for 

The vessel had a 
transport. In this capacity she steamed over 184,000 




War record as an 




miles, 



and 



carried 



wonder 

held the Atlantic re- 



cord 



for 



over 




years, have passed 

the hands of 



mto 
the 
Now 
White 



ship-breaker. 

Canard 
liner 



the 



Star 



' ' Olympic ' ' has suf- 
fered the same fate. 






long career in 
the North 
Service began in 
1911, and continued 

24 years, with 
the exception of a 

break during the 

Great War, when she 
became an armed 
transport. Altogether 
she made 257 round 




more than 200,000 
Canadian and Ameri- 
can troops without 
a single casualty, al- 

several 



though 
occasions 

attacked 



on 






marines. 



she 

by 
In 



was 
sub- 
May 



1918 she even sue 
ceeded in sinking one 



of 



these 




assailants, ramming 
it as it rose to the 
surface near her. 
On her withdrawal 






The Cunard White Star liner "Olympic" when in service. This famous vessel made 257 round voyages across 
the North Atlantic, steaming about a million and a half miles, during her career of 24 years. She was taken 

out of commission in April 1935 and is now being broken up. 



from service in 1935 

the "■ Olymp ic " was 

bought by Sir John 

for 



Jarvis, 



ne 




steaming 



about a 



trips across the Atlantic Ocean, 

million and a half miles, and throughout Jier service 

she was a great favourite with travellers'" from both 

SlflPS of tllS OC62LI1 

The "Olympic" was built by Harland and Wolff Ltd., 
at Belfast. She was 882 ft. 



M.P., 

£100,000 in 
order to provide work 
at Jarrow. There 100 men have been employed during 
the last two years in stripping her. She was too large to 



beach at Jarrow for her hull 

for this purpose she was 
this year to Inverkeithing, on the shore of the 






up, 

September 




9 in. in length 





her 






gross tonnage was 46,439, 
making her the largest 
ship 



e ver b uilt at 



the 



time of her completion. 



Until the 



appearance 



of 



the "Queen Mary" she was 

the largest passenger ves- 
sel built in the United 






Kingdom, and even then 
she remained the world's 
largest triple- screw 
steamer. 

With her four funnels 



and 



fine 



lines, 




e 



"Olympic" was a hand- 
some vessel, and set a 



new standard by the 
luxury and comfort of her 
passenger accommodation. 

She had many features 

that had never previously 

been seen in Atlantic liners, among them a swimming 

pool and a squash rackets court. She left Southampton 

~ 

on her maiden voyage to New York on 14th June, 1911, 




of Forth. 

Instead 



of 




steaming 



along under her 
own power, the "Olympic" 
now little more than a 
hulk, was towed to the 

breaking- up yard. The trip 

was one of the most deli- 
cate towing feats of recent 
years. All traffic on the 

Tyne was stopped as the 
great hull was towed from 
her berth by six tugs, 
and started on her journey 
out to sea. There were 

tugs with her as 
she passed down the river, 

ahead, three astern, 
two in attendance. 
On reaching the open sea 
two sea-going Dutch tugs 



eight 




The "Olympic" docking at Southampton after completing a transatlantic passage. The 
illustrations on this page are reproduced by courtesy of Cunard White Star Ltd., Liverpool. 



took 
later 




of her, and 



others 



and 



accom 






the crossing in 5 




s 15 hr. 2 min 



at an average speed of 21.43 knots. Her last voyage 



began on 5th April, 1935, when she turned her back on 



join 




them in the task of towing the "Olympic" on her last 
voyage. This was much shorter than her regular passages 

soon reached 





across the North Atlantic Ocean, and 
Inverkeithing where she was tied up for the last 
Now the great liner, once an ocean greyhound, is being 
broken up and reduced to scrap. 



662 




MECCANO MAGAZINE 



nnnnn 




Here we review books of interest and of use to readers 
of the "Af M* n We can supply copies of these hooks 
to readers who cannot obtain them through the usual 
channels. Order from Book DepL t Meccano Limited, 
Binns Road, Liverpool 13, adding If- for postage to the 
price. Postage on different books varies^ but any balance 
remaining will be refunded. 



a 



Corporal Corey 1 ' 



"Wardens of the Wild 1 



9 



By T. ۥ Bridges. (Harrap. 7/6 net) 






Mr. Bridees* attractive book tells us what 
steps are now being taken to preserve as 

as possible of the strange and 



many 

wonderful 




res 




have 



been 



threatened with extinction by the spread 
of civilisation. He has sought everywhere 
for information, and bis accounts of the 
many great National Parks and reserva- 



s now set aside is full of interest, in 



By Jack O'Brien. (Harrap. 5/- net) 

Man y won dc- r f u 1 stories have been told of 
the manner in which the Royal Canadian 
Mounted Police have kept order in the vast 

remoter regions of Canada, where at times 
every constable has to work on his own 
initiative while upholding the splendid 
traditions of the Force. Mr. O'Brien's story 
is full of exciting adventure, but at the same 

time pictures life in the Force as it really is, 

| with the stern training and strict discipline 



ii 











eluding tales of exciting adventures 
wild animals and a wealth of out-of-the- 
way 
birds 



information about the habits of 
and beasts. 



The opening chapters deal with Africa, 

which possesses the world's finest zoo in 
the Kruger National Park, in the Trans- 
vaal. Mr. Bridges tells us about the half 

that now inhabit this 




ion 




magnificent san 







of ne 




9 , 000 



square miles of unspoiled Africa, Then 
follow wonderful stories of elephants, not 
only in Africa, but also in Ceylon, India, 
Burma and Malaya. In Asiatic countries 
the elephant is highly valued because of 
the intelligence and strength it displays 
when tamed and put to work, and even 

create havoc 




where wild 
among plantations there is a decided feel- 
that these creatures should be 



ing 



protected. 

One of the most interesting chapters in 
the book deals with the gorilla of Central 
Africa, a great ape that may weigh up to 
4001b., 




its height is o 






of a man. It is curious that the equatorial 
forests in which this creature lives also 
house the 
being. 




the smallest human 




are 




Parks 




san 



musk oxen in 



id stories of National 

buffalo and 

and 










for the koala and opossum in 
Australia, and for other creatures else- 
where. We read of Grey Owl, who has 



A picture taken in the bird sanctuary of Charles £. Jones, 
Vancouver. From "Wardens of the Wild," reviewed on this page. 



Famous Aircraft" 




driving 



forces behind 



created a beaver reserve in Canada; of 
"Jack" Miner, the founder of a sanctuary 
for wild birds near the Niagara Falls; of 

lire ma n now 




Charles J ones, a 

living in British Columbia, whose bird 

tame; and of 




are 




T. P. Bell chambers, who did similar work in 
Australia. Belichambers had an 

influence on animals of all kinds, particu- 
larly birds, and on one occasion succeeded in 



that form 

every action. 

Jim Bradley, the son of a wealthy mine- 
owner, is told by his father that he is too 
fond of easy living to make good, and on a 
sudden impulse decides to join the Canadian 
Mounted Police. We next find him in train- 








the broken wing of an 



eagle . 



Mr. Bridges devotes a special chapter at 
the end of his book to birds, which he 



describes as Man's best 




md, 




shows 



how they are now being more and more re- 
garded as creatures that must be preserved 
rather than as game or merely something 
to shoot. The book is well illustrated by 
means of 32 full -page plates. 




ing at Regina, where he is given a hard time, 
particularly by the riding instructor. At 
first he becomes irritable under this treat- 
ment, and threatens to quit. His great 
Corporal Corey encourages him to stick to 
his guns, however, and a great chance comes 
when the police are called out to a riot in a 
mining village in the frozen North-West. 
Bradley distinguishes himself greatly. With 
Corey he joins in a stern chase after the 
leader of the rioters, who is captured and 
brought back in the face of stupendous 
difficulties. There is a coloured frontispiece 
and 12 full-page illustrations. 



By A. Coble and A. R. Payne* (Chambers, 6/- net) 

Here is a book that tells the splendid 

le air in a novel 





story of the conquest 

and particularly interesting manner. Except 
for a brief outline of progress up to the year 

1910, the authors show readers what has 
been done by giving fascinating accounts of 

the construction and performance of a 

succession of famous aeroplanes, with an 
excellent line drawing of each. The result 
gives a vivid idea of the rapid progress 

made in aviation. 
The book begins 

machines of the War period, and the story 





is 




to the 




uction of the most 
recent air liners and of the Mayo Com- 
posite craft now undergoing trials. Among 

the aeroplanes described are those in 
which the flights of Alcock and Brown, 
Lindbergh and others across the Atlantic 
were made, and the machines used by 




Polar explorers such as Wilkins, Byrd and 
Amundsen. Other famous machines dealt 

with include those in which record flights 
were made by Cobham, Scott, jean 

Batten and others. The British seaplanes 

that won the Schneider Trophy outright 

fully described, and bombers and 
fighting machines, commercial aircraft of 
all kinds, flying boats and airships also 
are included in the scheme. 

"Sands, Clays and Minerals" 

Edited by A. L. Curtis 
(Vol. Ill, No. 2. 3/6 net) 

The current issue of this valuable 
magazine contains 97 pages, and its con- 
tents fully maintain the high standard set 
in previous numbers. There are contribu- 
tions for the general reader as well as the 

and all are well illustrated by- 
ex cellent photographs, 

A special feature is made of the mineral 

possibilities of the British Empire. The 

Editor makes valuable suggestions for a 

survey in which not only Governments, 

but also statesmen, mineralogists and 

engineers would take part, and is con- 




fident that this would reveal resources 

that would make the Empire rich and self- 
contained. Some idea of this mineral wealth 






is indicated in articles on the possibilities in 
different parts of the Empire. One is con- 
cerned with Kenya, which may eventually 

yield supplies of gold and copper. Another 
deals in a similar manner with 




which has threat potentialities as a producer 



of copper and certain rare 




A third is 






devoted to a survey of the mining industry 
of Cornwall. 

The remaining contributions deal with 
such topics as beryllium and its alloys; little- 
known uses for borax and boracic acid; the 

of coal, and 
various cements, clays and sands. Interest- 
ing articles give an account of the trade 
of the Port of Hull, describe the minerals 
of Southern 






and sum 



up 



the progress that has been made in mining 



in Nova Scotia during 



1936 





* 




MECCANO MAGAZINE 



663 



1 t 



The Evolution of Railways" 




By Charles E. Lek, F.R.S.A., C.I.Mar.E. 

(The Railway Gazette. 2/6 net) 

Mr. Lee's account of the evolution of 

, ■ ■ 

railways is only 64 pages in length, but is a 
most important contribution to railway 

history. In it the author dis- 
poses of many misleading 



legends and stories about 

tram and plate ways, and the 

origin of the modern rail and 
the flanged wheel; and the 

information on a wide variety 

of railway topics that he has 

unearthed makes his book a 
fascinating one that should 
be read with keen interest 

all railway enthusiasts. 
The story of railways be- 
-an much earlier than is 
generally realised, and the 
author actually traces the 
evolution of rail tracks from 



"A.C.E." 

By S. P. B. Mats. (The Southern Railway. 2/6) 

title of this book, "A,C.E. t " is an 

of "Atlantic Coast Express," 



The 




reviation 



the popular S.R. express serving Devon and 
North Cornwall, The book describes in an 



n 



The Modern Book of Engineering 



it 



By W, H. McCokmick. (A. and C. Black. 5/- net) 

Readers will welcome this splendid book 
on modern engineering triumphs by Mr. 

Editor of the "MM." It is a 




companion volume to " 







Modern Booh of 




the system of roads in 



the 



Babylonian Empire about 

3800 B.C. Certain later roads 
included 



two 



continuous 




parallel lines of stone blocks, 
and the use of this form of 
permanent way spread to the 

Greeks, whose 
sisted of parallel stone 
with ruts or grooves to ac- 
commodate the wheels. Rut- 
ways were used by the 





Aeroplanes" and "The Mod- 
ern Book of Lighthouses 



Lightships and Lifeboats," 
also by the Editor, published 

year, and its purpose is 
to show the engineer design- 

and equipping 





mg, 

his creations. 

The first chapter deals with 
the construction of the steam 

locomotive, from 

when it is represented only by 

to its appearance 

in readiness for trials on the 






road. The 




< 



ling of a motor 
car by the latest mass pro- 
duction methods follows, 
fter 



a 



w 




we come to the 
story of a great ship, first to 
the time when it is launched, 
and then to its fitting out 
and completion for its work 
at sea. 

Tunnels form the subjects 

three 





A locomotive that has been at work for 50 years in Australia. It runs on wooden rails. The 



of the 

The first deals with mountain 

tunnels, and explains how 



illustrations on this page are fr 



i it 



i i 



The Evolution of Railways," reviewed on this page. 



powerful 



drills 



and 




Romans, and an example was unearthed 
in this country in 1901. 



Narrow gauge mining railways with 




wooden rails seem to have been in use in 
Central Europe as early as the 12th century, 
and the author includes an illustration of a 

- 

16th century mining wagon with flanged 
wheels. It is difficult to fix the date of the 
adoption of rail tracks in this country but 
this seems to have been in the 16th century 

Gradual developments resulted in* 
an extensive system of wagon- 
ways in coal-producing areas, 

especially in the- North Eastern 

districts. 

The sections dealing with the 

development of the tramroad, or 
plateway, are. of special interest. 
It appears that this form of con- 
struction was not really a step in 
the development ot permanent 

but was introduced in 1776 

for the use of vehicles with flat 
tyres that had to tra\ r el partly on 

the ordinary road and partly 
on the* tramroad. 

is well illustrated 



entertaining manner what can be seen from 
this famous train, and its interest drives 
home the statement in the introduction that 
the best way of seeing England's country- 
side is from the window of a train, Mr. Mais 



gives his readers every possible help in 
looking out of the window with him, and 

there is a sense of real disappointment when 
the text comes to an end, with the striking 
observation that "the nearest land is in 



plosives are used to break up 
the rock. This method also is used * 
underwater tunnels 



w 



hen 







for 

pass 
through rock, but those driven through the 

clay or mud of river beds are constructed 
with the aid of shields, and compressed air 
keeps water out of the workings. A special 
J ~ _ cription is given of the construction in 
this manner of the Holland Tunnel at New 
York, the 

n ed for motor traffic. The following 














The 
by reproductions of photographs 

drawings, most of which 




play important parts in the 

author's arguments. 



■ . 



Locomotives of the Great 



Southern Railways of Ireland'* 

By S. J. W. (A. H. Stockwell. 3/6 net) 

The author feels that the 

of Ireland have been 
represented in recent 
railwav literature, and has com- 
piled this account of the loco- 
motives of the Great Southern 





chapter is 




to the even 







road tunnel under the 

Mt-rst-y th< t t: was opened in 19'M. 

Mr. McCormick then tums to 
canals, the story of which forms 
a wonderful chapter in engineering 




work. He begins with the 

of Brin dley and the famous canals 

that he constructed in England, 

and passes on to the building of 

the Manchester Ship Canal and 
the creation of the Suez and 
Panama Canals, the world's most 
famous waterways. The wonders 
of these gTeat canals are well 



described, 



and 



the 



dramatic 



events that led to their com- 
pletion are vividly recounted. The 
Welland Ship Canal, 
Canadian wa 
Lake Erie with Lake Ontario, is 





their 




recent rival as an 




engineering marvel, and a special 
section of the book is 
to its construction. 

Bridges of various types are 
dealt with in the remaining chap- 
ters. The reader is given full and 



A loaded 





on 



ways 

that line 



of Ireland to assist travellers 






to identify the locomotives 



He 



gives the 






together with 





that they see 
dimensions of 
interesting notes 

the book also contains useful 
formation on gradients and haulage power. 
A summary and register of Great Southern 
Railway locomotives is given, and there 
are 34 illustrations of engines dealt with. 



tram of the type used in South Wales 12S years ago for 
iron ore. It is now in tbe National Museum of Wales. 

another hemisphere, three thousand miles 
away, " 

Quaint but fitting illustrations by Anna 

Zinkeisen add to the charm of the book, and 
the journey can be followed on a folding map 

of the route that has on it reproductions of 

aphs of places of interest to be seen. 
There is a striking cover design that con- 






accur at e description s of 
greatest structures of this kind, 
from Telford's suspension bridge 
across the Menai Straits to the Forth Bridge, 
the Sydney Harbour Bridge, and the recent- 
ly completed Golden Gate and San Fran- 
cisco-Oakland Bridges in the United States, 
Famous examples of bridges that travel, 
open, lift and swing also are 

The illustrations are of unusual interest. 







veys to 
invitation 




in attractive 




the 



to "look out of the window." 



There are 16 photogravure full page plates, 
reproducing 25 photographs of engineering 
works or operations. D. G. 



664 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 




THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 





666 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 




These pages are reserved for articles from our readers. Contributions not exceeding 
500 words in length are invited on any subject of which the writer has special knowledge 
or experience. These should be written neatly on one side of the paper only, and should 

A Visit to the Outer 

Recently I made the trip by sea from Kyle of Lochalsh 




to Lewis, in the Outer He 
a fine twin-screw 
steamer built in 1929. 
We steamed 




. I went in the 




he accompanied if possible by original pliotographs for use as illustrations. Articles 
published will be paid for. Statements in artistes submitted are accepted as being 
sent in good faith, but the Editor takes no responsibility for their accuracy. 

■ 

Interesting Trees in North London 

There are several famous trees in North London 
the best known 




i 






Minchenden Oak. 



* 




* 



is a 





ward, 
Applecross, 



a call at 

the 



on 




and then 
turned seaward across 
the Minch and headed 



for 



Stornawav, 




es 




50 

the north- 

west. We passed round 
the northern coasts of 
Skye and Rona, and 
after about three 

ing sighted 






We 



tied 



up 



at 










Min- 
of 



standing 
chenden 

Rest. It is said to 
be well over 800 years 






old, and is a 

of the ancient 

of Middlesex. Mention 

* 

in 

Book. The 
t r ee at 

the base is 27 ft. 6 in,, 

and from 
south the 






StOrnawaV in the early The lmpusmg rum o! an ancient temple at Callernish, Lewis, in the Outer Hebrides. The photographs 

* J on this page are by R. J. Robertson, Balcrno. 



to 
of 
its limbs and branches 

is 136 ft. 

Not far from the 
celebrated oak stands 



evening. The town is 



a 





one 



a population of 



It has an excellent 






over 4,000 



an interesting black 






has enabled it to 



become a 



great herring 



fishing centre 



There are many interesting relics of ancient times to 

m * * 1 J /"* 11 # 1 1 /I ■ 1 ^ 



be seen in 





at Callernish, some 16 miles from 



Stornawav, I saw the ruins of what is 
been a temple erected to the 

. It is the most com- 




*ght to have 




with concrete, 

solid interior. 




about 




ago 



that leans at 



trunk has been filled 
bears fruit in spite of its 



At 




Finchley is an oak tradi 







is a 



fine 





assocn 









plete and imposing rum 
of its kind in the West of 
Scotland, and consists of a 




of stone 




ars sur- 



rounding a monolith 17 ft. 

Other stones are so 




that 



the 



general 



formation is that of a giant 



cross 
At 



- 




stands 

the remains of a fort built 
by the Celts about 900 A.D. 

was used 









the Celts as a refuge 
attacked by the Norsemen. 
They drove their cattle into 
the inner circle of the fort, 






lost its head. It is called 
Turpin's Oak, as the famous 

supposed 
it w 

fleeing from the Bow Street 
runners after one of the 

daring escapades that have 

made his name so notorious. 
Bullets alleged to have been 

at highwaymen have 
extracted from the 






Other 
London 



trees 






North 



have 



m 
interesting 



associations. For instance, at 

of 





Road 

■ 

The remains of a fort built at Duncarloway, Lewis, by the Celts about 1,000 years ago. Road there 



Seven 






a 



and the people themselves remained in the narrow space 



between 




outer 




inner walls. I mana 




to get 



inside here, and was astonished to find so little room that 
I could scarcelv turn round. Yet refugees sometimes lived 



there for three 




R. 




group of elm trees known as "The Seven Sisters/' forming 



a ring round a walnut tree. The story is that their name 
was derived from the fact that they were 








seven 



sisters. The original trees were replaced about the middle 



Robertson (Balerno). 



of the last century. 



R. Edminson (London), 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



667 



<i 



A Strange Australian Bird 

Many Australian birds are named after the sounds of 




c 







is the common 





its well-known cry. Then there is the plaintive peewit, and 
the curious bird named after its greedy cry of "more pork, 



The 



(€ 



Viceroy of India" at Malta 




months ago it wa 




fo 




desirable to dock 









more 




Another 
has earned the name 
of "whip bird/' while 

the laughing 






and Oriental liner "Viceroy of India*' 

for slight repairs to the rudder and several other parts 
of the vessel. She was therefore taken to Malta, the 











derives its name from 
its frequent fits o 
what seems to be up- 
roarious laughter. 



Strangest 



of 



all 



these feathered 

however, 
is the bird popularly 




know 



n as the 



<< 



four 




ii 



called 



It is also 

poor 




the " 

the "monk" 

j "leather- 



head/* these names 






nearest 

the necessary 




t ff 



T'T 





ing 



facilities 



were 



available. No, 4 Dock 



in 



the 



Admiralty 



was 






liner was towed by 
two Adm 






were swung 



which 

open, 

were carried from the 



and 



hawsers 






ship and fastened to 

capstans at the sides 





e gates. The 

capstans were then 
set in motion, and 




■ 





appearance; 
ut its correct name 



The friar bird of Australia, popularly known as the "four o'clock" bird from its call. Photograph by K. Allen. 

Oatky, New South Wales. F 



is the friar bird. It does not present 




upper 




on 




page 




sight, as 
Its long beak 
with a large lump in the centre indeed gives it a decidedly 

look. The crown of the bird is bare, which explains 



u 




its name, and the growth of chocolate-brown feathers 
commences about half-way down the neck. It 











wing 





both 



through 



the 



air 





can move swiftly, 



over 



the 



ground. 



It 



is not unusual to see it hanging head downward 



from 



a branch 



of 



imitate a flying fox 
pilferer. 




a tree 
The 

K. Allen 




trying to 
inveterate 
N.S.W.). 




ca 



ans, the 
capstans further 





egaii to 

move into the dock, 

her stem slowly 

were trans 








wall, 









these pulled the ship far enough inside to allow the 
gates to be closed. 

Meanwhile wooden beams of various 

to hold the 
of the dock. Ropes hanging down 
tied to the ends of the beams to 
the hull at the waterline. The pumps 
emptying the dock and 




were 



them touching 





a few minutes the ship's 
keel grounded on the bottom. The pumps were slowed 



and dock-hands in small punts 




v 



charge of the 



In Harbour at Colombo 









On a 
England 



r ec e n t 



voyage 



to 




N ew Zealand , 

it was a welcome change to 
reach Colombo, the capital of 

and to see land and 
scenery again; for since leaving 
Fremantle in Western Aus- 




tralia, nine 



days 




we had seen nothing but water. 
About an hour before we enter- 



ed 



the 



harbour we 



passed 



several catamarans, or native 
fishing boats, going seaward to 















free ends of the beams, fitting 

them 

dock side by means of wedges. 

The water continued to run 

out slowlv, and the beams 

took more weight as 

settled down. Finally 



by 



the 





signal given 

master, all 

struck into position at ex£ 

the same time bv means 



wedges were 




heavy 

ship was thus secu 



sledge-hammers. 



The 





in place. The remaining water 






was 












pum 

work on the ship 



was commenced. 

The 



looked very picturesque when __ 

Seen against the palm-fringed , W««yofliidI.»tadiy dock at Malta. Photograph by J. M. DemaBuele, Malta- a£ter ftJ j^ 




of the vessel 








morning 




shores in the early 

At about 8 a.m. our ship tied up to buoys in Colombo 
Harbour. Already 18 other ocean-going vessels were 







s, 



at anchor, including two British war 
Enterprise," The harbour was alive with 




tt 



Kent" and 




tuers 











dashing to 




been carried out was much easier than the docking. The 
dock had only to be filled until the ship was in a sufficient 
depth to be able to float, when the two 
pulled her out again into the harbour. She then resumed 
her voyage to England. 





The 



a 



fro. On these were dozens of coolies, nearly all stripped 
to the waist and wearing skirts that reached to the 
ground. When 



Vic eroy 




India" is a fine twin-screw 




of 19,700 tons built by 
Ltd.. and com 




these 




in 








freedom of movement. 



to 
E. R. 



give 




just 

their limbs more 

(Banbury). 







Stephens and Co. 
She is fitted with turbo- 

. . . 

and at the time of her 
completion was the largest vessel of her type in the 
world. J. M. Demanuele (Malta). 




668 




MECCANO 







DDDCDnnDnnnpniiDannDDnnnnnnnnnaannDnnnnnnnnDDCDDDnDDanannnnnDnannD 
n ^T, . ^ n 



a 

a 
□ 

a 



i 









: 




n 













a 

D 

□ 



Excavators and 




♦ 




ing- 





a 






MONG the most useful machines that the modern 
engineer has at his disposal are the many varieties of 
excavators and trench digging machines. These "machines 
for digging holes/' as they may be called, are made in a 



variety of types 







sizes, and provide the Meccano 



model-builder with splendid subjects. In addition to the 



pleasure obtained in 



building 



the 




there 



is 



the 



setting it in motion and 
it carry out all the 



thrill of 
of seeing 



movements 



of 



its 




prototype. 

kind 




s 



excavators 





and 
ing 

been 




trench 
machines 
illustrated and de 
•ed from time to time 
in the "MM." so that 

readers should have no 



superstructure is mounted on an undercarriage, and this 

being taken from 



runs on rails, the 

the main engines or motor. 



travelling motion 




mechanical shovel of this kind possesses many 
features that make it a good subject for a model. There 





exam 




box and shovel 




ways in w 





g mechanism can 



gear- 
be arranged, 



and the model-builder who likes experimenting is given 

opportunity for including original ideas. There is 
also plenty of interesting work in designing an efficient 

undercarriage for the machine. 
Of course, to build a fully detailed model, such as that 

Outfit will be required, but 
readers whose limited stock of parts will not allow them 
to attempt so elaborate a model need not be discouraged, 
as it is possible to do really interesting work with the 
smaller Outfits, provided that each part incorpor- 
ated is used to the best advantage. This fact is 



illustrated 




m 




- 

ing 



suitable illustrations 
on which to base their 
models. One of the best 

of ex- 





1S 




me- 



known 

cavators 

chanical shovel. Most 

model-builders will 

have seen one of these 

machines in 

levelling hilly 

" or digging large pits for 





the 



foundations 



buildings. 




e 




It 

ucket 



of 

a 



has 

shovel 



mounted on the end of 
a stout steel arm or 



dipper stick, that in 
turn is connected with 
a jib by two long racks 

gear 




with 
ven 






by 



a 



steam engine, or an 




simple but realistic model 

shown in Fig. 3, the construction of which 
should not be beyond even a beginner's 

This model was designed 

Argen- 





and although small it is 



capable 



of 



working 



in 



a 



realistic manner. A minia- 

boiler is 
with a Sleeve Piece 









fitted with a Chimney 

and the en- 
gine cylinder is formed 
with a Coupling. The 
superstructure of the 
model can be swivelled 
and the dipper stick is 

turning 



operated 



by 



separate Rods. 

For driving a small 



model 



of 



this 




type 



is no more suit- 
able power unit than a 



Magic 



Motor, 



and 



with one of these and a 



electric motor. 



The 



Fi 



bucket arm can be rack- 




1, This model of an electric shovel is the work of J. Willems, Antwerp, Belgium. It Is operated 
y an Electric Motor, which drives 10 separate movements through a well-designed gear-box. 



few 




it is quite 



ed in or out as desired, thus varying the working radius. 
A wire rope fastened to the bucket passes over a pulley at 
the top of the jib, and then is attached to a winding drum. 



The result of this arrangement is that as soon as the gear 






clutch is engag 




drum winds 




and the 
ure has a 




can be ex- 

the 




bucket is pulled 
swivelling movement, a 
cavated without the necessity of 
of the base of the machine. 

The leading edge of the digger bucket is fitted with a 
cutting lip armed 'with a number of teeth that dig their 

\ In most machines, 




way into the material to be 

the jib is attached to'a swivelling framework, in which the 

gears and power 




are housed. The whole revolving 



easy to arrange a simple 
yet practical mechanism that will carry out all the 
essential movements. 



A mechanical shovel that can be used 




as a r 




breaking machine has been introduced in America. This 
machine is similar in action to that already described, but 



the bucket can be replaced by heavy hammer-shaped 



weights. 



The dipper 




is pivoted at 



instead of its centre, in such a manner 

raised and then dropped quickly, so that 
hit the rock to be broken with great force. 




end 

can be 
weights 



In a model machine of this type the hammer can be 






represented by two Boiler Ends fastened together by a 
Screwed Rod and Nuts to form a drum. If desired, the 
drum could be loaded with bits of stone or rock to 








THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 




* 



* 









give it additional weight so that it will fall quickly. 

excavator . that differs consi 

shovel, 
model- builder, is the dragline. The name "dragline 
derived from the fact that the digging bucket is suspended 
from the end of a very 

jib and is dragged 



the 
possesses equal interest to the 

' is 







along the ground towards 

the machine by a flexible 

being 
dipper 



rope, 



instead of 



reduction drive. When the dragline reaches the site on 
which it is to work, the feet are raised and the dragline rests 
on its large circular base. This machine was illustrated and 
described on page 192 of the March 1937 "M.M.," and re- 
producing it in Meccano would prove an absorbing task, for 

there is ample opportunity 

to dis- 
play his model-building 
skill. The walking median- 



attached 



to 



a 



stick as m the case of the 









mechanical shovel. While 
mechanical shovels ex- 
cavate above the level of 

the ground on which they 

stand and advance into 



the excavation 



as 



the 



work proceeds, a drag- 
line excavates below the 

level on which it stands, 

ards 

•when it has excavated all 
the material within reach. 
Some draglines are 






mounted 



on 



creeper 



tracks so as to make them 
suitable for 







ism 






a 



knotty problem to work out 



during the winter evenings! 

Owners of large Outfits 

will find ample opportunity 

to test their model-building 



in 



modelling 



an ex 



skill 

ca vator of the multi-bucket 

type, a fine model of which 



is 




m 



Fig. 2. 




se 



machines are used for con- 
structing canals and widen- 
ing and deepening rivers, 

run on rails laid on the 








the 



excavated 



material being discharged 



soft or mars 
For 



a 





Fig. 2. A good example of a multi-bucket excavator built In Meccano. It was constructed 

by R. Campbell, London, S.W.16. 



into trucks waiting along 
side. 

along an arm that can be 






can be represented by 
Sprocket Chain, but when they are required for a large 



arranged 



at 



the 



angle 



model the best plan is to construct segmented tracks 
from Strips bolted to endless lengths of Chain. 

Another method of making creepers is shown in the 
model illustrated in Fig. 1. In these the segments or treads 
are represented by short Strips, which are bolted to belts 
of canvas. The canvas passes round driving wheels formed 
by 3" Sprockets, the drive being transmitted by the teeth 
of the Sprockets biting into the canvas. A tensioning de- 
vice is fitted to take up any 



necessary to produce the desired contour in the sides of the 
canal or river, and which can be raised or 




as 




as the work 









slackness in the belts. 

dragline must 

strongly built. This applies 
particularly to such parts 

as the base and jib, which 
are subjected to 
loads. In 



The Meccano Dredger Buckets can be used to good ad- 
vantage in a machine of this kind, but where smaller buckets 
are required, they can be made with two Double Brackets 
bolted together to form a box. These can be attached 
to Sprocket Chain with short lengths of wire. 

Other interesting excavating appliances that make ex- 
cellent subjects for models are the various types of trench 

digging machines that are 





e models as 



much use as possible there- 
fore should be made of 





They can 
be bolted together to form 
or channel section gir- 
ders, and if skilfully arrang- 




ed will give all the rigid- 
ness and strength requir- 
ed. There should be no 



a 
for 





in 



bearing 



devising 






used for cutting trenches for 
pipe lines. Some of these 
machines are capable of 

trenches 6 ft. deep 
and 2 ft. wide at the rate of 
a mile a day. Usually they 
are in the form of a tractor 

creeper 

between which is a boom 
that supports an endless 






bucket 



s 



The 




• 



in 



chain of 
bucket chain is 
motion by the power unit, 
and as the buckets pass 
around the lower end of the 

die: 






the swivelling superstruc- 
ture, but it is advisable to 



Fig. 3. This illustration of a simple model steam excavator shows the good work that 
in this direction by owners of even small Outfits, The model was built by M. Guticrre 




that there is no rocking movement, otherwise the 
model will not work smoothly and steadily. The arrange- 
ment of the mechanism for hauling the drag bucket back- 
ward and forward may be planned on similar lines to 
Suggestion No. 363, described on page 591 of the 
October 1936 "MM." 






Another form of dragline used for working on marshes 
is a giant machine, that "walks" with the aid of two great 
"feet," which are operated through a very 




the 
ground. Then they travel 
upwards with their load of 
spoil, and as they pass over ■ 
the upper end of the boom 

the material is discharged on to a conveyor that deposits it 
at the side of the trench. Means are provided for raising and 



can be done 
z. Martinez. 




of cut can be 










lowering the boom so that the 
justed as required 

The conveyor belt is driven at a higher speed than the 
buckets, and in a model can be made from a strip of canvas 
or corrugated cardboard. If sufficient parts are not 
available to make proper creeper tracks, it is a good plan 



to use straked wheels built up with Flexible Plates. 



670 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



I 




D 



A New British 



Weight Design 



□ 




t^he 




ritish oil engines of the submarine type was 



JL due in the early days of such craft to Vickers Ltd. They were the 
original inventors of what is known as the solid or airless fuel 

injection system, which they brought to a high state of practical 
development. At the end of the 



high 




ensure ignition of fuel injected into the cylinder. 






The fuel, which is fairly heavy oil, is handled by a battery of 
small pumps situated below the control levers and driven by the 



engine. These fuel pumps 





Great War the 



of 



engines 

British submarines, with the 
exception of a few ex 
installations, were exclusively 




of Vickers 1 



design, 



all 



using 




it will 



solid injection. 
Before going 
be well to explain the meanin 
of "solid injection." In the oil 



1-1 



engines origin c 







a 




by 
Rudolph Diesel, whose first 
English patent was dated 1892, 

the fuel was inje 
pressure air blast, and this 
system is still in use. In many 
modern engines, however, it has 
been replaced by what is known 
as the airless or solid injection 
system, in which the fuel is 
pumped into the cylinders under 

high pressure through injection 



nozzles 




the War the 



Admiralty Engineering Labora 

tory was set up, and among its 
first tasks was experime 




their output controlled by a lever 

ing on their suction valves. 

They discharge into a common 

main, or "rail" as it is us 




termed, 




maintain in 




rail a pressure of from 2,000 lb. 
to 8,000 lb. per sq. in., the 
pressure varying with the 
power re 

From the rail a pipe leads to 
a sprav valve on each cylinder, 






opened for a 
second at 




this valve 

fraction 

beginning of each firing stroke 

by a cam-nperated tappet. 
The opening of the spray 
valve is regulated 
to the power and speed of the 
engine. The spray valve admits 
the fuel to a nozzle with a 
number of very small holes in 




it. The fuel 




from these 





engme 



of the 






work on an 

Vickers type. Late in 1920, with the concurrence of the firm, a 
large proportion of the results obtained was made public, convincing 
oil engine designers that solid injection wa an established fact. 
From about that time may be dated the beg tin ing of a world-wide 

development of this system, leading to its ultimate adoption by 
almost every maker of oil engines. It is probably true to say that if 
it had not been for solid injection the use of the oil engine in many 



of if£ present applications, more particularly in traction and in 



A new six-cylinder, four-s'ioke oil engine developed by Vickers-Armstrongs Ltd. The 
illustrations to this article are reproduced by courtesy of Vickers-Armstrongs Ltd. 



holes at high velocity in 
form of fine highly penetrating 

needles, passes into the heated 

air and immediately ignites, 
thus giving the required power 
impulse 



In other particulars the engine is on more or less orthodox lines, 

in order to save weight and space drop -forged columns and 




a semi-welded bedplate are used. The air and exhaust valves are in 

duplicate, which give smoothness of operation and great durability. 

~* * is of the reversing type. On stopping the engine 



The 



engine 



the reversing wheel is free to be turned, thus lifting the 





en sliding the 





till the reverse cams are below 




e 




space, 
of the 



weight 



and com- 



flight, would never 

brought about owing to the pro- 
hibitive 

plication 

engine. 
After 



air 




1 u II 





the War the oil engine 
of Vickers Ltd. consisted 
mainly of machinery of Admiralty 

e, culminating in the huge air 
injection engines of 5,000 h.p. 
fitted in the "Thames'* class of 

■ 

submarine. Subsequently the firm 

set themselves to develop new 

engines of their own type. The 

first of the 

eight-cylinder engine of 1, 

b.h.p. at 500 r.p.m., several of 
which were fitted in Portuguese 
submarines built at Barrow. Fol- 
lowing upon the successful run- 
ning of these engines during long 
trials and on actual service, a 
smaller six -cylinder engine was 

in two 



new designs 



was an 




develo 




and was 



_ 





Estonian su 
shown in the upper photograph on 
this page, proved equally success- 
ful, and we give a brief 




the push rods, and finally dropping the latter into contact with 

the cams. The engine is started 
by compressed air admitted by a 
lever-operated valve. As soon as 

the engine is moving smartly 
on air, the spray valves are put 
into operation. The engine now 
runs on fuel, and the air starting 
lever is put to the "off" position. 
The control gear is very simple. 



and is shown 



t rat ion 



The 




lower illus- 
levers are 



for the fuel pump, the spray 
valve and for air starting respec- 
tively. The large wheel is for 
reversing the engine, the smaller 

one being for adjusting the timing 
of " " J " ■' " 



injection, 

analogous to 



its 



effect 



that of 



the 



"spark 



being 
moving 



in a motor car 



engine. 



The control gear of the new Vickers oil engine shown in our upper illustration. 

The purpose of each control is explained in this article, 







of its main features. 
The engine works on the four-stroke cycle, each cylinder thus 

one firing impulse during two revolutions, as do most 



giving 

motor-car petrol engines. The fuel is not admitted in the form of gas 

during the suction stroke, as in petrol engines, but is sprayed, 
towards the end of the upward stroke, into the air compressed above 
the piston. The compression pressure is about 450 lb. per sq. 

in., which results in the temperature of the air being sufficiently 



The large wheel seen at the base 
of the engine in our upper illustra- 
tion is for turning the engine 

during refit or valve-setting. Just 
above this wheel is the lever used 

for engaging the turning gear, 
A considerably larger standard 
now in the final stages of develop- 
ment at the Barrow works of Vickers-Armstrongs Ltd, All 



engine of the new design is 



the new engines occupy much less 




than earlier ones, 



and weigh only about 30 lb. per brake horse power, which 



is only half the cor res 
The saving of weight 
be of 
they may be fitted. 






in 



weight of early Vickers designs, 
space they make possible 

of vessels in which 






THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



671 



* 




© 



h 










ti 



A NEAT MECCANO CYCLE ACCESSORY 

A useful accessory for a bicycle has been designed 
in Meccano by P. Le Ferre, Harleston, Norfolk, It is a 

"stop" indicator, which is attached to the rear of the 

bicycle and lights up whenever the brakes are applied, 
thus giving warning to following traffic* 

It consists of a box-shaped structure built up from 
5fc* and 2J* Angle Girders, Three of the sides and the 
ends are filled in with 5|* by 2£* and 2 J* by 2±* Flexible 
Plates, The remaining aide is filled by a 5T by 2Jr* 
rectangular sheet of tinplate in which the word "Stop 
is cut out in bold capitals. The tin is backed by a sheet 
of red celluloid and holes are punched in it to enable it 
to be bolted in position. Inside the box is a flashlamp 
bulb, which is screwed into a Meccano Lamp Holder. 
The indicator is fastened to the rear forks of the bicycle 
so that the word "Stop" shows to the rear. This is done 
by means of suitable brackets made from Strips, which 
are electrically "earthed" to the frame, if necessary 
removing the enamel from the brackets and forks 
where they make contact with each other. 

The device can be operated either from the headlamp 
battery or from a separate battery. One terminal of the 
battery is earthed to the frame and the other terminal 
is connected by wire to an insulated Strip fastened 
to the rear brake lever. A second insulated Strip is 
fixed to the handlebars, in such a position that when 
the brake is applied the Strips make contact with 
each other* The handlebar contact is connected to 
the terminal of the Lamp Holder, It will be seen 
that when the brake lever is pulled upward to apply 
the brake, the circuit is completed and the indicator 
is illuminated, 

A BUILT-UP UNIVERSAL COUPLING 

In constructing model motor cars, 
or other models in which it is required 



to transmit the drive from the gear- 

a shaft a 




up 

the 




car slowly climbed up the side! Then by varying 
speed of the motion the car was made to ride 
and down the wall just like the real car does on 
Wall of Death. 

Wilson found that the best results were obtained 
by using a wet bowl, as on a dry surface the Racing 

tended to turn over when coming to rest or 

starting off. 

A great deal of fun can be obtained in trying to 
keep two Racing Cars racing round the bowl at the 
same time, and Wilson assures us that with practice 
the feat can be accomplished, If the bowl available is 
of small diameter the small M.G* Sports Car or the 
Racer (Dinky Toys Nos, 35b and 35c) will be found 

suitable. 

A pood plan and one that gives scope for model- 
building ingenuity, is to construct a Meccano mechanism 

for operating the bowl. 
For example, a vari- 
able eccentric on which 
a frame containing the 
bowl is mounted might 
be used* The eccentric, 

Electric 



Wheels are 





tin 



mttHttMHfr 









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i 









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*M 






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< Y& 



driven by an 

would 



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Motor, 
the bowl 



and 



rotate 

the 

and its 



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car in motion, 
ovement up and down 

the wail could then be 

controlled from the 



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ing the 

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receive 
experiments 






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box or driving unit to a 

short distance away, it is necessary to 



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employ a positive drive that takes up 
as little space as possible. This can be 
done by using either Sprocket Chain 
drive or shaft drive, but it sometimes 
happens that the driving and driven 
shafts are out of line, so that if the 
shaft method is used a flexible coup* 

needed is the transmission. 

the best 



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and joumalled in the usual manner so that the Pinion 
meshes with the contrate wheel of the Motor. The 

on a standard Meccano Rod 
joumalled 1 J in. in front of the rear axle, and the 
drive is taken to the Rod through Sprocket Wheels 

and Chain. 

MODEL RAILWAY POINTS MADE WITH MECCANO 

Railway points provide an unusual subject for the 
serious Meccano model-builder. There is plenty of 
scope for interesting work in this direction, however, 
especially if the more elaborate systems of points 

are modelled. 

L. Mczzetti, Rome, sent details of a set of three-way 
points that he has constructed. The main rails, which 
have a gauge of 2§ in., are made from 1 2 J* and 24 J* 
Angle Girders, rigidly connected by 2|* Angle Girders, 

Where the track divides, the rails are made from 

s, placed in positions similar to the c 
ponent rails of actual points. The movement of 
the points is controlled by two levers connected 
by a series of links to the rails, and the complete 
unit is mounted on a base work consisting of 
1J* Angle Girders. 

An outstanding feature is the neatness of the 
guides used for the operating links. They are 
made from Double Brackets, inside which an 
Angle Bracket is bolted by its slotted bole, 
Sufficient space being left for a Strip to slide 
freely in the Double Bracket. 

We congratulate Mezzctti on the neatness and 
originality of his model, and hope that he will 
continue to show the same enterprise in his 
choice of subjects. 

MECCANO SHOCK ABSORBERS 

Several model-builders have written to us 
suggesting that special parts should be intro- 
duced for use in constructing miniature shock 
absorbers. The proposal is interesting, but we do 
not consider that special parts need be intro- 
duced, for many of the standard parts can be 
adapted for the' purpose quite easily. Car type 
friction disc dampers can be constructed by 

I* loose Pullev. fitted with a I 



■■ 



.-. 



- : 



. . 



u'-: ■■ 



+ 



4 



.■ 



Pulley, 

between two Bush Wheels, The 



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&? 



.-'■-■ 



ling 

The 



' 



is neeaea in 

Universal Coupling is 
part to use for this purpose, but when 
this is not available a built-up coup- 

Purvis, Stafford, 






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J' 



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. 



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The boys of the Catholic 

at T f ao Nan, 

keen 



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t"- *- ! 









M 



i l^fWB 






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ling devised by D. 
can be used satisfactorily. It consists 
of two small Fork Pieces and a §* 
Steel Ball (Part No. 117). The forks 
one of the Fork Pieces are bent 



* 






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Mission, 
Manchoukuo, are 

model-builders, and 

this photm r.iph \se see 



in 






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two 



of them 



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inward slightly so that the Steel Bail 

is gripped firmly between them. The 

second Fork Piece is treated similarly, 

and is then pressed on to the Steel Ball so that its arras 

interlace with those of the first Fork Piece* If desired 






given in future issues of the 



examples of their 
made by 

readers in this 
direction so 
that particu- 
lars can be 



with 
work. 







End Bearings can be used in place of Fork 

We have tested the device and find that it is quite 
efficient and will transmit the drive through ail angles 
to about 135 degrees between the driving and driven 
afts. At a sharper angle the Fork Pieces bind and 
tend to lever each other off the Steel Bath 

Purvis discovered a novel use for this coupling in 
building an adjustable lamp, the_ light of which can 
be thrown in any required direction. Three 
joined by two built-up couplings. One end Red is 
attached to a base, and at the end of the third is fixed 

a Headlamp, which is connected to a 4*5 -volt flashlamp 
battery, A lamp of this kind is useful for illuminating 
dark corners when assembling intricate models, 

AN EXCITING CAME WITH DINKY TOYS RACING 

CARS 

T. Wilson, Coventry, visited a "Wall of Death 1 * 
show at a fair, and was so impressed bv the performance 
that he decided to make a miniature "Wall of Death" 
of his own. With the aid of a large enamelled bowl, 
about 14 in, in diameter and 4^ in. deep, and a Dinky 
Toys Racing Car, he devised a jolly and en 
game. The Racing Car was placed on the bottom 
of the bowl, which was then held between both hands 
and given a slow and steady circular motion. This set 
the car racing round and round the bow), and by 
* " increasing the speed of the motion the 



MOTOR CAR CONSTRUCTOR PARTS USED WITH 

MECCANO 

Owners of No, 2 Motor Car Constructor Outfits will 
be interested in the ingenious models devised by P. 
Hornby, North wich. Hornby discovered that he could 
convert an ordinary two-seater car into a four-seater 
in a very simple manner. In building a car such as Ml 
and M4 shown in the Instruction Leaflet, he omits 
the body Centre Section, thus leaving sufficient space 
to incorporate a second seat. An alternative method 
is to lengthen the chassis of the car with a few standard 
Meccano parts, The front part of the car is assembled 
as shown in the Instructions Leaflet, and the driving 
seat is bolted in position. Then two Z" Strips are bolted 
to the upper rear corners of the Dash. The rounded 
Rear Section is fitted with the clockwork motor, 
Flat Brackets are mounted on the forward bolts, the 
Flat Brackets being bolted through their circular 
holes so as not to obstruct the hole for the wheel axle. 
The Rear Section is then bolted to the 3* Strips and 

Frame Side Member, This method of 



gripping a 

Rubber Tyre, 

friction between the Tyre and the faces of the 

Bush Wheels effectively damps any shocks 

to which the unit is subjected. 

A novel type of shock absorber for use in large 
models can 'be made by placing a number of 

Rubber Rings between Bush Wheels. One of the 
Bush Wheels is fixed to the chassis of the model 
and the other is free on a Rod. Any shocks to 
which the model is subjected will be absorbed 
by the compression of the Rubber Rings. This type of 
shock absorber could be used for "Oleo" legs for large 
Meccano model aeroplanes, or for damping vibration 

and noise in models. 

A similar shock absorber that would be useful in 
building such models as electric fans can be made with 
the largest Rubber Tyres. One or two Tyres placed 
between the base of the fan and the table, or other 
support on which it is placed, will greatly reduce the 
noise made by the whirling blades. There are many 
other instances where Tyres will be found useful in this 
respect, and it may be mentioned that cushions formed 
with Tyres are ideal for preventing nuts and bolts 
working loose after a model has been working for 

time. 



some 



SPLIT PINS 






ample space for a rear seat, 
left in the sides of the car can 




also to the 
construction 

and the small space 

be filled in with stiff card painted to match the colour 

scheme of the model. 

As the position of the rear axle is different from 
that in the normal model, the drive must be altered 

slightly. The rear axle is fitted with the driving pinion 



P. Cardew, Lincoln, suggests that split pins should be 
included in the Meccano system. In real engineering 
split pins are used extensively for locking nuts and for 
holding in place oscillating parts of light machinery. If 
split pins were introduced into the Meccano system, 
however, holes would be required in the Rods, and this 
would not only weaken them but would render the 
Rods less suitable for other purposes. A much better 
plan is to use Spring Clips and Washers, or Collars. 

A SPECIAL MECCANO CHUCK 

P. Weston, York, suggests that special Meccano parts 
suitable for building up a drill chuck would be useful. He 
points out that the present Coupling, which is often used 
for this purpose, takes drills only up to |* diameter, 
and even of these the smaller ones cannot be held 
firmly. The idea has possibilities, but we do not think 
such speciah^d parts would be generally popular. 



672 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



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□ 

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Four Simple 





Novel Subjects 



□ 

a 



M 



OST model-builders will have seen a bacon-slicing 
machine in operation at the grocery stores, and no 

doubt have thought what a line subject it would provide 

for a modeL These machines are 

no means so complicated as 

they appear to be, and by exei 




cismg a 



little 




a 





can 



com i 




good 
working model can be built 

easily from a few simple 
parts. An example of w 
be done in this direction is 

shown in Fig. 1. 

Construction of the model is 

fastening two 
double strips 1 along the 
of a 5V x 2f Flanged Plate 2. 
Each of the two double strips 
consists of two 5|* Strips spaced 

by two washers, and to- 
gether they provide slides for 
four Double. Brackets bolted 
underneath the 3Vx2V 








meshes with a Y Pinion on a 2" Rod 9, which is journalled 
in a Double Bracket that also is bolted underneath the 
5£" X 3£" Flat Plate 8. The 5 J" X 3£* Flat Plate is attached 

by two |* Bolts to the 5 J* X2£* 
Flanged Plate, and then the 
Contrate Wheel on the end of 
the 4-J-* Rod is adjusted so that 

Pinion on 

Rod 



it meshes 







the 




it 



carrying the Crank. The drive to 
the knife is transmitted by a 




Band 



from 



the 






1 



n 




Pulley on Rod 9 to the 

Pulley on the shaft of the knife. 

The machine is mounted on 



four legs 

lFxi 





of 



four 






ed Plate" 3 that forms 

riage on,, which the bacon is 

placed. A*-2 ff Strip is fixed by a 

lock-nutted Bolt 4 tO the Centre Fig. I. A cleverly built working model of a bacon slice*, which is capable 






of the Flanged Plate 3, and the 
other end of the Strip is fastened by a second lock- 
nutted bolt to the arm of a Crank. The latter is secured 



of carrying out the chief movements of the real machine. 



Double Angle Strips, 
and these are bolted to each 
corner of the 51" xW Flat 
Plate. 

Parts required to build model bacon slicer: 
4 of No. 2; 2 of No. 3; 1 of No. 6; 2 of No. 6a; 
6 of No. 11; 2 of No. 12; 2 of No. 12a; 1 of No. 
15a; 3 of No. 17; 1 of No. 22; 1 of No. 23; 1 of 
No. 24; I of No. 26; 2 of No. 29; 23 of No. 37; 
1 of No. 45; 4 of No. 48; 1 of No. 52; I of No. 
52a; 1 of No. 53; 2 of No. 59; 1 of No. 62b; 
1 of No. 109; 6 of No. Ulc; 1 of No. 115. 

The best starting point' in 



to the upper end of a 1£" Rod 
the Flanged Plate 2. 




is journalled in 



Two VxV Angle 




5 




bolted to the flanges 



of the 5^x21* Flanged Plate, 
and their horizontal arms are 
extended by two H" Strips. The 
ends of these Strips are 
by a 3Y Strip, to the centre 
which is fastened a Double 
Bracket. 

The revolving 
is represented by a 



building the petrol driven invalid 
chair shown in Fig. 4 is the seat. This consists of a 2 \" x \\* 
Flexible Plate, to one side of which is bolted a 1 j£" radius 
Curved Plate to form the rounded front, A 2\" x 2\" Strip 
Plate 1 is fastened to the Curved Plate by two Angle 
Brackets, and the sloping foot-rest 2 is a 2 \* X l| ff Flanged 

that is secured to the 




mounted on a 



2" 




also carries a \ n fast Pulley and 



is 




# 



in 



the 



Double 



Bracket. A guard for the knife is 
provided by a 3|" Strip curved 
to the required shape and fixed 
in the position shown by an 
Angle Bracket. 

The machine is operated by 
rotating the Bush Wheel 7. This 
is fitted on one end of a AV Rod 

that 

Bent Strip and an Angle Bracket, both of which' are 

bolted to the underside of the 5 J* x3V Flat Plate 8, but 
spaced from it by putting two washers on each bolt. The 








ard edge 



of the 2\" 






X2i" 




Strip Plate I by two Obtuse 
Angle Brackets. 

Two further Obtuse Angle 
Brackets are used to fasten a 

\Y Strip 3 to the front of the 

the 
bolts holding also a Double Bent 



2Yx\\ K Flanged Plate, 



Strip. A 2* Rod 4 is journalled in 
the middle holes of the 1 \" Strip 
and the Double Bent Strip, and 
on its lower end is fixed a large 
Fork Piece with its arms down- 
wards. Two V Corner 

bolted to the arms of the Fork 

Piece fun a the beatings for the 





w 




axle 




is a 1" 



Rod, The Rod is held in place by 




Fig. 2- An underneath view of the bacon slicing machine^ showing the 

drive to the cutting knife and the bacon carriage. 



two Spring 




s, and between 



Rod carries two 




K 




Wheels, one of which is 



fixed on one end of the Rod and the other at its middle 





le 



Contrate 




in the middle of the Rod 



the two Corner Brackets it carries 
a 1* loose Pulley fitted with a Rubber Tyre. The Rod is 



held in place by a Collar above the 1 J* Strip, and at its 
upper end is fastened a Coupling, which carries in one of 
its end transverse bores a 3|* Rod that forms the steering 
shaft. The steering handle is a 2" Rod held in a Coupling 




to the shaft. 






* 




t> 






I 






b 



6 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



673 






The rear axle is a 4" Rod 4, which is journalled in two 
5£" Strips secured to Strip Plate 1 by a 2£"x£" Double 



Angle Strip and two Angle Brackets. A 1" Pulley fastened 
at the centre of the rear axle is driven by a Driving Band 
from the small pulley of a Magic M otor bolted underneath 
the seat of the carriage. In order to prevent the Driving 
Band slipping off 
the Pulleys, it is 
passed 




sides of 
model, the 

to 



van 




i" 




Brackets. To complete the 




boards and mu 





are bolted 



supports, and the rear 
the chassis and geared to the Motor pinion. 




in 



Meccano parts required to build model delivery van: 2 of No. 2; 1 of No, 5; 2 of 

12c; 26 of No. 37; I of No. 48a; 4 of No. 90a; 2 of 






No. 6a; 10 of No. 12; 2 of No 

No. 188; 1 of No, !*-; J of Ko. 



194. 



The 



* 




a 




n 



loose j. 



inoun 





Rod journalled 
two holes in front 

of the 

The 






is cover 







edby a 1^'Curv 
ed Plate 6, 
represents the 

petrol engine cas- 





remaimng 







model to be de- 
scribed this month 
is a petrol-driven 
electric generating 
set, This is 
illustrated, but its 
construction 

is easy to 
A 5Vx2i "Flang- 
ed Plate provides 

for the 




a 



base 





Fig. 3. A fine model in which Motor Car Constructor parts are used in combination with ordinary Meccano parts 



Angle Brackets. 
The cylinder of the 
engine 

* loose 
secured by a f " bolt to the Curved Plate 6. 



model, and to it 

two Flanged 
Sector Plates 
fastened vertically 
and seven holes 




a 




fast Pulley, both of which are 








Parts required to build model invalid chain 2 of No. 2; 2 of No. 5; 1 of No. 6a; 
2 of No. 10; 10 of No. 12; 4 of No. 12c; 1 of No. 15a; 1 of No. 16; 1 of No. 16b; 2 of 
No. 17; 1 of No. 18b; 2 of No. 20a; 1 of No. 22; 1 of No. 22a; 2 of No. 23; 1 of No, 23a; 
6 of No. 35; 48 of No. 37; 1 of No. 37a; 8 of No. 38; 1 of No. 45; 1 of No. 48a; 1 of 
No. 51; 1 of No. 59; 2 of No. 63; 2 of No. 90; 4 of No. 90a; 1 of No. 1 1 la; 1 of No. 116; 
2 of No. 133a; 2 of No. 142a; 1 of No. 142c; 3 of No. 188; 1 of No. 199; 1 of No. 200; 
1 Magic Motor. 

Fig. 3 shows a model delivery van built up of standard 



Meccano parts, and 




from a No. 2 Motor Car 



Constructor Outfit. In making it the chassis is first built 



up 
the 



from the Constructor Outfit 




and the 





and the centre section. The radiator and 



of Flat Brackets. The space between the flange 
Sector Plates is filled in on each side 





Flanged Plate and one 




3V 



and five 




means 

of the 



one 3|" x 3£ ff 
Strips, to form 




the crank casing. The top of the crank casing is 

by three 3£* Strips secured in position by Angle Brackets, 

and on them two Sleeve Pieces, fitted at their ends 

with 

Brackets to repres 

in the bosses of the Flanged Wheels forms 

rod. 






are mounted by rx|* Angle 

A 2" Rod 






piston 



The crankshaft 



is 



a 




ft 



the two Flanged Sector 



b 



Rod and is journalled in 

a flywheel 





steering 





are 



also 



assembled as described in 
the Instructions Leaflet, 
and a seat is secured in 

position between the sides 

of the dash. The Motor is 
then bolted in position 
between the sidemembers 

of 





holding 

for the rear mudguards 

and two 2J" X tt* Flexible 

Plates. These 

Plates form the lower ends 

of the sides of the body of 
the van and each of them 










is extended upwards 
3i"x2§* Strip P 




a 





Two 5J* Strips are nex 
bolted along the upper 
sides of the 3\" x 2£* Strip 




It 

consisting of two 2" Pul- 
leys bolted together. The 
dynamo is represented by 
two Boiler Ends fastened 

by two 2" Rod 




Rods pass also 

through a 2\" Strip bolted 



to 





i*y9 

'2 A. *- 




tf 



flange 



of 



Flanged 



the 
Plate 

forming \hr. base of the 

model, the Strips providing 
support for the dynamo. 
The dummy valve gear 
of the engine is constructe 
by fastening a 1 




Pulley 
. The 
lower end of a 2" Rod 



on 




cran 




journalled in 







Angle 



Brackets bolted to the end 
of the crankcase, rests on 




and between them 



Fig. 4. An interesting model of an unusual type. 

Motor and is cas 



This invalid chaii is driven by a Magic 
• to build. 




SO 



a 5|*x2|" Flexible Plate, which forms the roof, is 

fastened by Angle Brackets, The 5£" Strips are 




supported from centre section by two compound strips 







two 2£" small 





Strips 



overlapped three holes, and from the ends of a 2£" X \" 



Double Angle Strip bolted to the dash by two l-£" Strips, 
The windscreen shield at the front of the roof consists 









of a 2\" Strip secured in position 




two Obtuse Angle 



shown in the illustration. 



Brackets as 

The back of the van is formed by a further 3|"x21" 
Strip Plate, the corners of which are fastened to the 



the boss of the 

that each time the crank- 

rotated the bolt in the boss of the Pulley strikes 
the Rod and lifts it a short distance. At its end the crank- 




i 




shaft carries also a fork coupling. This is built up by 
placing a Chimney Adaptor and a large Fork Piece on 




the shaft and pressing them against the V Pulley of the 
valve gear. The boss of the Fork Piece 
Chimney Adaptor, and to each arm of 
a Collar is fastened by a \* Bolt. 




inside the 
Fork Piece 



Parts required to build petrol driven generating: set: 5 of No. 3; II of No. 5; 4 
of No. 10; 4 of No. 12; 2 of No. 12b; 1 of No. 14* 2 of No. 16; 2 of No. 17; 2 of No. 
20a; 2 of No. 20b; 4 of No, 35; 48 of No. 37; 2 of No. 38; 2 of No. 48b; 1 of No. 52; 
2 of No. 53; 2 of No. 54a; 2 of No. It lc; 2 of No. 162a; 2 of No, 163. 




THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 




□□□□DDDDaDDD 





etition 




□ 



'Thistle-Cutting 





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On this page we illustrate an interesting agricultural 



machine designed 




bracken and weeds on farmland 



for cutting down thistles, 




] 



manufactured 





It is 




Wm. Brenton Ltd., Polbathic, Corn- 



wall, and has features that make it a particularly suitable 

ect for a Meccano 



both in external appearance and method of working. In 

attention will be given to 







the means adopted for driving the cutter shaft, and for 

raising and * ... - - - 



lowering 



the cutter from 




This 
we 



month 



drive should work easily, whatever 

cutter 




a 



model. 

therefore, 

range of fine prizes for 

the best working models 

of this machine built by 

readers of the "MM.*' 







the main features 



of 



the 



machine 



readily be seen in 



illustration, 



and 



can 
the 
com- 



■ 

petitors should have no 
difficulty in completing 

their models, The thistles 

■ 

are cut down by a rotat- 




three-bladed 



mounted 
end of a 



from 




the 






bon- 



is 



lower 

driven 



right-hand 






wheel of 

Separate levers are pro- 



vided 



for 



cutter from 



r ai si ng 



the 










or when it is 

travelling to or from the The thistle, 
working site, and for dis- 






of the 
devis- 



ing means of effecting 
this will provide scope 
for ingenuity 
source. 




The contest will be 
divided into two Sec- 
tions (A) for competitors 



the 



British 



living in 
Isles (B) for competitors 
living Overseas. A separ- 
ate set of prizes 






awarded in each Section 

as listed in the 

at the foot of the page. 

Readers 

eligible 

the 




are 

* 

in 
in 



corn- 




order to give 
petit or an equal 
his age will be taken into 

his 





and weed cutter that is the subject of the model-building competition 
announced on this page. Photograph by courtesy of Wm. Brenton Ltd. 



consideration 

model is judged. 

A good photograph or 

a drawing is all that 

is required for the pur- 
poses of the competition, 

actual models must 




con 





drive to the cutter 



The drive to the cutter is taken from 







toothed gear, fixed on the right-hand 

machine, to a horizontal shaft, which in turn drives 



not be sent. Each photograph or drawing submitted 

the sender's age, name and 



must 




on the 







full address. If desired, a written description of the 
model may be enclosed with the photographs or 



through bevel gears the vertical shaft carrying the cutter, drawings, but it should be as brief 



The lever for raising and lowering the cutter can be seen 
beside the driver's seat, and the method by which it is 
connected to the cutter shaft will be clear from the 



i t 



Envelopes containing entries 






po 

be addressed 






Thistle 



Cutter 




Model-Building Contest," 



Meccano 



illustration. The shaft is retained in 



i 



Binns Road, Liverpool 13. 




desired 




means of a 



□nnnnnnannnnnnpanaannnnnnannan 
a 



The Home Section 



(A) 



of the 



lever, 




device 

on a toothed quadrant, 

provided to allow it to be 
quickly when necessary on 
account of any obstacle. The clutch 




that disconnects 




drive to the 



cutter is on the right-hand side of 
the driver's seat, 

machine is hauled by one 




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Thistle*Cuttin 





A 



Competition 
THE PRIZES 

and 



separate and complete set of prizes as listed 
below will be awarded in each of the Sections A and B: 
1st Prize, Meccano or Hornby Goods value j£3/3/-. 
2nd Prize, Meccano or Hornby Goods value £2/2/-. 
3rd Prize, Meccano or Hornby Goods value j£1/1/-, 
5 Prizes of Meccano or Hornby Goods value 10/6. 
Prizes of Meccano or Hornby Goods value 5/-. 




horse, 



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Contest will close on 31st December, 
1937, and the Overseas Section (B) 
on 28th February, 1938. Entries 
should, be posted as soon as the\ 
are ready and not 

near the closing dates 




over 




1 



* 



It should be noted that photo- 



graphs or 
models 





harnessed 



one 









between shafts 
side of the right- 






prize- winning 
property of 







road wheel. 

s in this position the horse walks on the 

area, so that thistles, bracken and other 



weeds are not trodden down. 



become 
Ltd., 

returned. Unsuccessful entries, 
ever, will be returned to the senders provided that 





are accom 








etitors may use any size of Outfit or number 
in building their models, and the aim should 

machine as closely as possible, 



copy the 




envelopes for that purpose 
Competitors 



by stain 




and 






in more than one entry if 
they wish, but no competitor will be awarded more 
than one prize. If several models are entered 
will be judged on their joint merits. 










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MECCANO MAGAZINE 



675 



♦ 



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Bu ildin 






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By 



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Spanner 




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great rigidity obtained by the use of only a few parts. 

J. C. Diehl, Buenos Aires, won a prize with a model of a swinging 

e. The swinging portion of the roadway of the bridge 
pivotally mounted at its centre on a 

can swivel at right angles to 






(Overseas Section) 



The complete list of prizewinners in the Overseas Section of the 



April "Bridge" Model-Building Competition is as follows: 



1st Prize, Meccano or Hornby products value £3/8/-: [. VYillems, Hnbokeri, Antwerp, 
Belgium. 2nd, products value £2/2/-: J. De Proft, Willebroeck, Belgium. 3rd, 
products value £1/1/-: P. Giese t Buenos Aires, 




JS 




on, 




IS 



by a pier 





Products 




value S/-S 

. Stock- 




holm; R # My burgh, 

Clartrmoat. Cape 

h to vince , S. A frica; 
D. Hofsommer, The 

Hagu?, Holland; H. 
Clark. Hokianga, 
New Zealand; J, 

Buenos Aires; 
L, M, Cbew, Singa- 
pore; D. Mullick, 
Calcutta; A. Gilissen, 
Maastricht, Holland; 
W. Thompson, Mel- 
Bo ur- 



bourae; 

gault, Tao-Nan, 

Manchoukuo* 

The fine model 

of an arched girder 




bridge 

CI 



i 




on 







page won 





First Prize for 

Wiflems. It eas 
outshone all the 
other entries by 




the fixed section 

the roadway to 
permit ships to 



each 





of the 



bridge 
type 



was entered in the 
competition by D. 

Hofsommer, Hol- 



land 



The model 



is well construct- 
ed, but unfortun- 



a 




tion 



more 

has 




n- 



been 

given to the me- 

details 

than to the ex- 
ternal 








of the bridge, and 



This fine model girder bridge is a splendid example of Meccano construction. It was built by J. Wilkms, Antwerp, and was 

awarded First Prize in the "Bridge" Model-Building Competition. 



this 

chance 




its 
obtain- 



1 



ing a higher award . 
The moving sec- 



its splendid proportions, beautiful lines and excellent workmanship 
The bridge is built chiefly of Angle Girders and Strips. The roadway 
is approximately 5 ft. in 




and at its ends the 



supported by expansion rollers from two piers. 




is 



J. De Proft, another Belgian competitor, succeeded in winning 
the Second Prize with a model of a lifting bridge that also is 



illustrated on this page. The central lifting span is supported by 



cables at each end from two towers mounted on 




piers 



Third Prize was won by a well-built bascule bridge constructed 
by Pablo Giese of Buenos Aires, a deciding factor in making this 
award being the good work done in designing the mechanism for 
raising and lowering the 
span. An Electric Motor is 
mounted on a gantry over 

the approach roadway, and 

through reduction 
drives 



tion of the roadway is raised and lowered by two Electric Motors 
concealed in the bases of towers at the ends of the 







roadways. 

A fine model of a suspension bridge was also awarded a prize. The 
model was built by the boys of the Catholic Mission, T'ao-Nan, 
Manchoukuo, who are very keen mod el -builders. The bridge is 
strongly constructed, and in the photographs submitted it is shown 
spanning a small stream arranged outdoors. Other examples of the 
work of these boys are illustrated on page 671 of this issue. 

The entry of D. Mullick is a model of the Forth Bridge, and 



although it is quite simple in construction, it reproduces faithfully 



prmci 

of its 



it 



a 



Rod 



gearing 





carrym .: 
two Pinions, These Pinions 
mesh with and operate two 

Rack Strips, which are 

attached to the 
centre 

The mechanism is capable 
of raising the span into 
an almost vertical position, 
and the details of its con- 
struction show that much 
care was taken over this 
part of the model. 

A simpler bascule bridge 



built 



by 



R 



Myburgh, 



Claremont, Cape Province, 

was awarded one of the 



smaller prizes. In 
model the centre 



this 
span 




the appearance 

pal 

famous prototype 





■ 




ewmners 






m 



"Lynx Eve 

Contest No* 



it 




Another of the successful models entered in the "Bridge 1 * Competition. It won Second Prize for 

J. De Proft, Willebroeck, Belgium, 






means of a Crank Handle, The bridge 



pivots on two Hob Discs, 

and is raised and lowered by 

is provided with a railway track built up from Angle Girders, 

and also with a roadway for Dinky Toys Motor Cars. A novel 

feature is that barriers are automatically placed at the ends 



of the approach roadways when the central span is raised from 



Home Section 

1st Prize, Products value £2/2/-: 
G. Johnston, SouthalU 2nd. 

Products value £1/1/-: R. 
Hughes, Llanbedrgoch, Anglesey* 
3rd f Products value 10/6: C. 
Wrayford, Moretonhampstead, 
Devon. 
Products value 5/-: J* Keeling, 
Hartlebury* 

Overseas Section 

1st Prize, Products value £2/2/-; 

Gnanadurai, 1 ricMnopoly, 

2nd, Products value 
£1/1/-: N. Rcy, Mauritius. 3rd, 
Products value 10/6: A. Dionne, 

Montreal, 
Products value 5/-: D* Murison, 
Buenos Aires; A. Abdulrahim, 

Karachi, 



j. 




a horiz 




position. 



The entry of A. Gilissen, Holland, was a model railway bridge 

with a span of 6 ft'. 6 in. Originally the bridge was built to complete 
the layout of the Hornby Branch of the Maastricht Meccano 
Club, of which Gilissen is a member. A notable feature is the 



The Instructions Manual illustrations from which the 16 
fragmentary pictures that appeared on page 358 of the June, 1937 
"M.M," were taken, are as follows: No. 1 — Model HI, Steam 
Engine; No. 2— G66, Anti-Aircraft Gun; No. 3— K34, Box Ball 
Alley; No. 4—D10, Hammer; No. 5— K28, Beam Engine; No. ~ 
LI, Funicular Railway; No. 7 — A7, Roman Balance; No. 8 — 




B17, 
11- 




Cart: No. 




K15, Crane; No. 10— K19, Crane; No 






B120, Sideboard; No. 12— B86, Garden Seat; No. 13— K39, 
Engine; No. 14— B100, Rickshaw; No, 15 — G58A, Submarine; 

No, 16— G59, Signal. 



676 




MECCANO MAGAZINE 




A Splendid Recruiting Scheme 

Moat Meccano clubs already know the value of Visitors' Nights, 
when parents and friends of members are able to see for themselves 
the good times that Meccano bovs enjoy. Every club should make an 
effort to arrange meetings of this kind. These have the effect of 
arousing a desire on the part of visitors to become more closely 
associated with the good work. Many boys and young men actually 
join clubs as a result of an invitation to an 
open night, and older people who for various 
reasons cannot do this are gratified by re- 
quests to be allowed to enrol them as associ- 




ate members. Such members 



a small 



subscription, say 2/6 or 5/ 




pay 

a year, and have 
the privilege of taking part in proceedings 

whenever they wish. They give valuable 

on special occasions, and their 

influence is always of great benefit. 

The Milan MX. have worked out a novel 
scheme of this kind. They have formed what 
is called a "Sympathisers Branch" for young 

men and boys who for various reasons are 

for full membership. The mem- 
branch attend club 
once a month and the committee's belief 








that this would be a preliminary step to 
full membership has been justified. 

I heartily recommend this scheme to all 
clubs. It is a recruiting device of the very 
best kind, for the new members are given a 
preliminary taste of the pleasures of club 



life and in consequence 
enthusiastic. 




nme keen and 



More Correspondents Wanted 



The response to my 

o»7 ititjr njr ft x__ 




in the 




u 




1937 



MM, 




ence 




more members for the 



has been excellent, but 
there are still many English members who 



wish to find friends in Canada, Africa, India, 
Australia, New Zealand and France. I should 
like more Meccano boys living in those parts 

of the world to join the Club. They will 
thoroughly enjoy correspondence with 

English boys of their own age and interests, 



and the exchange of stamps, postcards, or 




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Meccano Club Secretaries 

No. 42. M, Thomson 




Club Photographs 

I wish to remind Leaders that I am always glad to reproduce 
group photographs, or portraits of officials or members with out- 
standing records to their credit, The appearance of photographs of 
the members, either in a group or at work in the club room, not only 
shows that a club is making good progress, but also gives great 
delight to the members who figure in it. This applies also to Branches 

of the Hornby Railway Company, 

A straightforward group photograph is 
best for reproduction in the "MM." Some- 
times there is a desire to include large models 
of special excellence, and when these are 
included it is advisable to place them in such 
positions that they are not directly in front 
of the features of the members in the group. 

In all cases as plain a background as possible 

one full of unwanted details 



M. Thomson has been the secretary of the 
Maylands (Western Australia) MX, since its 
formation last year. In association with Mr. V. 
Malmgreen, the Leader, whose portrait appeared 
last month, he has played an important part in 

the rapid progress of the club. 



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IS 




gives a 



effect. 



Reports from Unaffiliated Clubs 

Many new clubs have been formed during 
the past year, and the secretaries of some of 
them have written occasionally to tell me of 
the progress made. I am afraid there is a 
tendency among new clubs, however, to con- 



si der 




as they have not 




obtained 
affiliation their work is not of sufficient 
interest to be included in "Club Notes." I 
assure them that they need not be diffident 
on that score, as I am keenly interested in 
unaffiliated clubs. All interesting club reports 



find their way into the Guild pages of the 

"MM." and their appearance gives great 
delight to the members of the club concerned, 

and spurs them on to greater efforts. The 

the news of the 




reports published 

existence of the club and thus help to attract 

new members, and may even be helpful in 

securing the interest of a suitable Leader, 

An Attractive Exhibition 




There is one point I should like to make 
clear. An applicant from overseas is not 
simply placed in touch with the first English member on the list of 

seeking a correspondent in his country. Great care is taken to 
introduce boys of roughly equivalent ages who have similar tastes 
and hobbies, and therefore are the most likely to form a lasting 
friendship. It is to the care taken in this respect that the great 
success of the Correspondence Club is due. 

Guild members who have not yet joined the Correspondence Club 
should seriously consider doing so at once, for until they take this 




The Islington MX, are holding an Exhibi- 
tion on Saturday, 27th November. This is 
being organised in association with the 
Islington Branch of the H.R.C., and will be 
held in St. Giles Mission Hall, Westbourne 
Road, Barnsbury, London, N.7. It will be 

open from 1 p.m. to 9.30 p.m., and all interested in Meccano model- 
building, miniature railway operations, and club work generally are 
cordially invited. The charges for admission are 6d. for adults, and 
3d. for children. Parties of six or more will be admitted at half-price, 
children applying at the door before 3 p.m. will be admitted for 2d. 



■ 



Proposed Clubs 



step they are undoubtedly missing an excellent opportunity of 
learning something of the interesting lives of boys in other countries. 
There is nothing more pleasant than to exchange news with someone 
living in a far-off part of the world, where conditions are utterly 



different, and there have been many instances in which correspond 




Attempts 



owing places, 



are being made to 




Meccano Clubs in the 




boys interested should communicate with 



ence 




led to meetings, or to an exchange of visits 




have 



confirmed the close friendship founded by correspondence. 



the promoters whose names and addresses are given below: 
Ardrossan — J. McLeish, 25, Winton Street, Ardrossan. 
Bradford — F. D. Rowan, 224, Toller Lane, Bradford, 

J, Amaratunga, Ma Eliya Estate, Jaela, Ceylon. 
London — K. Brown, 156, Devonshire Street, Stepney, 




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E.l. 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



677 



t» 



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Mount Senior Boys' School (Newark-cm-Trent) MX. 
— Membership has increased, and enthusiastic meetings 

are being held. Extensive model building is being 
carried out. An interesting visit has been paid to the 






L,M,S, Works at Derby, and arrangements are being 
made for a visit to Hull Docks. Club roll: 44. Setwetaty: 
E. Masding, Grove House, Lime Grove, Newark/Notts, 



Coloured Mission (Cardiff) MX. — An interesting 

programme is being carried out this session. The club 
stock of Meccano has been increased, and model- 
building, on a larger scale than previously, is the chief 
occupation of the members. Club roll: 10. Secretary; 
David XL Binstead, 37, Penhill Road t Llandaff. Carditi- 

Middlesbrough MX* — Attendance is steadily in- 
creasing. Model- building activities have chiefly taken 
the form of interesting club Contests, and these have 
attracted excellent entries. Table Tennis is a favourite 
pastime of the members. Club roll: 30. Secretary: 
L Stewart, 59, Kildare Street, Middlesbrough, 

Bryntirion MX. — Plans are being made for an 
Exhibition. Games are very popular, and include 
billiards, chess and ping-pong. Club roll: 14. Secretary: 
P. Parry, Ar-y-bryn, Penllwya Park, Carmarthen. 

Exeter MX. — ModeKbuildlng 
has engaged the attention of the 

at recent meetings. As 
usual an excellent variety of 

subjects have been reproduced in 
miniature, and recent models 
completed have included wind* 
mills, ships, bridges, excavators, 
a crane and a traction engine. 
The chief diversion of members 
has been Darts. Club roll: 22. 

A. J. Hancock, 237, 
Monks Road, Exeter. 

Great Baddow MX. — Full ad- 
vantage was taken of the summer 
weather last session , and all out- 
door meetings were well attended. 
A 'treasure Hunt across the local 
countryside, in which the clues 
were hidden in gateposts, stiles, 

and similar places, was a great 
success. A Cricket Match between 



Only attend the Meccano meetings when invited to the 
monthly Open Night. Members are busy working for an 
Exhibition. Club roll; 13. Secretary: A. D. Straker, 42 , 
Onslow Gardens, Muswell Hill, N.l. 

Folkestone MX*— Recent activities have been 
concerned chiefly with the Hornby layout, and some 
realistic operations have been carried out. A visit has 

been paid to Folkestone Harbour, where during a two* 
hour stay the party saw three finc^ steamships, and 
witnessed also the departure of six express trains 
crave ving passengers from the ships to London. 
Club roll: 7. Secretary: W. F, Cotter, 72, Dover Street, 
Folkestone. 

Breich MX. — Meetings are now held in the Welfare 

Hall, and the club are readily assisted by the Hall 
officials. Some interesting Lantern Lectures have 
been given. During the summer an excursion to 
Edinburgh was greatly enjoyed, members visiting 
both the Castle and the Museum there* Club roll: 
10, Secretary: M. Anderson, 36, Jtreich Terrace, 
West Calder. 

Sid Vale MX, — During the Winter Session meetings 
arc* being held weekly, and an interesting programme is 











led by the secretary and 
storekeeper ended in a victory for 
the former by only four runs, 
after a very thrilling finish* An 
Object Hunt has been held, at the 
start of which the members were 
given a list of unusual objects* 

and then bunted until these were 
found. Points were awarded for 
the first team home, and also for 
the finding of the correct objects. 
Club roll: 21. Secretary: K. J. 
5, Crescent Road, Great Baddow. 

Chelmsford. 

Old Charlton MX, — At one meeting the evetvpopular 

two-minute talks were given. Marks were awarded to 
members taking part, and added to those earned for 
model- building. The member who obtains the highest 
number of marks during the session will be awarded a 
cash prize. On another occasion a novel "Hunt 11 was 
held. Several rhymes giving clues to well-known streets 
or buildings in the vicinity of Charlton were read, and 
the members had to identify the references. Club 
roll: 22. Secretary: K. L. Morphew, 221, WestcomU 
Hill, Blackheath. 

Wednesbury MX.— Separate meetings for Juniors 

and Seniors are now being tried, and if the arrangement 
works well it will probably become permanent. Model- 
building activities continue, and Games Evenings are 
held regularly* On one occasion a member brought a 
Table Tennis outfit; another contributed a dart board, 
and a third a pitching board. Film shows and Lectures 
are being arranged. Club roll: 24. Secretary: A. L. 
Morgan, 17, Cobden Street, Fallings Heath, Wednesbury. 
Hornsea MX.— Great interest is being taken in 
Meccano model-building, and two excellent motor 
lorries have been constructed. One evening each 
month has been devoted to a Hornby Railway session 
occupying three hours. Boat races have been held on 
Hornsea Mere. The Senior Engineers won the first race 
by one length, and the Junior Scientists the second one 
by four lengths. The Apprentices recently scored a 

victory over the Junior Scientists during a ganMi of 

bowls* A visit has been paid to the newly- ex cava ted 
Roman remains at Brought and Pickering Park Museum, 
and some enjoyable cycle rides also have been held. 

Club roll: 19. Secretary: P, Thorn, S t Alexandra Road, 
Hornsea. 

Islington MX.^The Meccano Section now hold their 
meetings on Friday nights, and the Hornby Section 
on Mondav nights. The members of the latter Section 




Aeroplane Competition has been held to discover well* 
made aircraft built by members, so that these could 

be photographed for use in future model Aeroplane 

Exhibitions, Club roll: 31. Secretary: H, Thomson, 13, 

Kennedy Street, Maylands, Western Australia. 
Melbourne MX. — A visit was paid to the Hobbies 

Exhibition at Brunswick Technical School, The 

exhibits included 22 Meccano models, and prizes were 
awarded for a fire escape and a motor wagon. At one 
meeting a Meccano elliptical lathe was demonstrated, 
and on another occasion Meccano models of a pile driver 
and a crane were brought by two members for in- 
spection. Visits also have been paid to the -l O" Gauge 
electric railway of Mr. P. Phillips, of St, Hilda, and 

to the wonderful remote-controlled "O" Gauge railway 
of Mr. Eadie* of Richmond. In both instances members 
saw much that was of the greatest interest. Realistic 
operations have been carried out on the club's Hornby 
Train layout. At one meeting an interesting effect was 
obtained by running several trains simultaneously 
while the room was in darkness, and depending upon 
the new illuminated track diagram to indicate the 
position of trains. A feature of the Hornby activities 

of this club is the carrying out 
of train schedules devised by 
the members. Club roll: 10. 

Secretary: L. I sou, 8, Hayes 

Street, North cote, N.16, 

Thebarton Technical School 
MX. — A Lecture by a Senior 

member on the "Solar System*' 

was much enjoyed. A sequel 
to it was an evening visit to the 
Adelaide Observatory, where 
members examined the 

clocks and recording instru- 

spent hours in ob- 
serving the planets through 
the large telescope, The guides 
were so surprised at the keen 
interest of the members that they 

presented each one with a generous 
supply of literature oa astronomy, 
A particularly interesting Lecture 
by a Senior member on "The Life 

"-■ " was 

an 







in One Drop of Water 

illustrated 





with the 

iascope. Club 

tary: B. 5. Clarke, I, 
Avenue, Linden Gardens, 

Australia. 




aid of 

75, 

Laurel 

South 



EGYPT 



Some of the members of the Christchurch and Ashburton clubs on the occasion of a joint excursion to seeing 
Timaru* Mr. J. An call, Leader of the Christchurch MX., is second from the right. These two flourishing 

New Zealand cluh* have their headquarters 50 miles apart, but regularly 




nge visits. 



Zagazig MX. — A special sight- 
tour in Cairo was ar- 
during the celebrations 
for' the coronation of 





being carried out- A ramble to Leak Hill and Mutter- 
moor in charge of the President was much enjoyed. 
Games were played while on the top of the moor. 
Club rolk 20. Secretary: L* R. L Gliddon, Sheffield 
House, Sidmouth. 

Winchmore Hill Collegiate School MX. — The present 
session began with the election of a new committee, 
and plans were drawn up for the Annual Exhibition, 
which it is hoped to hold early in December- Members 
are now engaged in constructing models for the event, 
and also a variety of handicrafts for sale at the Ex- 
hibition. Another attraction will be a variety show. 
Club roll: 31. Secretary: J . A, Piejus, 22, Woodland 
Way; Winchmore Hill, London, N.21: 

St. Stephens (SaJtash) MX. — There has been an 

increase in the membership of the Model-buildin 
Section. The large models of Gatwick Airport an 
Millbay Station are practically completed, and work 
on the D.H. "Dragonfly" aeroplane and the racing 
yacht " Shamrock' " is making good progress. The keel 
has been laid of a 3 ft. model of the M.V. "Stirling 
Castle." Club roll: 16. Secretary: IL Braund, 9, Homer 
Park, Saltash. 

Grammar School MX.— The Meccano 




The city 



was 




Farouk. 
„ ed, and the tour was greatly enjoyed- A 
visit by camel has been paid to the Giza Pyramids, 
and a motor car tour included visits to the two chief 
Coptic Churches, the Mosque of Amr, and the wonder- 
ful Egyptian Museum, Indoor activities have in- 
cluded 'the construction of travelling and swivelling 
cranes, and a Social and Games Evening. Club roll: 
22. Secretary: Miss B. Mangourie, 39B, Sharia El 
Sikka El-Hadid Avenue, Zagar.ig. 



ITALY 



Milan MX. 




■Important additions have been 
to the club stock of Meccano, and members are now 

, The 





B rid port uammar 
Section is especially popular. Considerable use is made 
of m rubers* capabilities in the construction of scientific 
models for demonstration during the school mechanics 

lessons. Club roll: 34> Secretary: Mr. M. R Tighe, 
39, Andrew's Road, Bridport.. 

AUSTRALIA 

Maylands MX.— Model-building is being earned on 
most enthusiastically, and all models are now built to 
a fixed schedule. The several Factions of the club 
have been busy preparing for an Exhibition. At one 
meeting each Faction presented an hour's programme, 
The Red and Blue Faction introduced brief discussions 

a feature new to the club. An 



able to build larger and more complicated i 

Library also has. been increased, and now includes 220 

books in addition to 12 magazines for which the club 



Photo-Chemico- Electric Section are 

and it is 




subscribes. The 

continuing their interesting experiments, 

ed to purchase additional equipment shortly- 
interesting Lecture on "Automobiles 60 Years 
was given recently by the President. An 
to Lake Lugano was greatly enjoyed. Club 

Secretary: Enrico Vigo, Corso Genova 19, Milan. 



A very 

Bencf* 

outing 
roll: 14. 








Southern 
for 






■ 



on various 




(Capetown) MX.— A Visitor's Evening, 
which a special programme was arrangedp was 
a great success, and the fine models of cranes, buses 
and aeroplanes built for the occasion were much 
appreciated* The j unior members are to build a motor 
chassis* The parents of members were invited to 
a Lecture by the President on "Modern Inventions" 
and this was much enjoyed. On a visit to the Capetown 
Airport, sketches were made and photographs taken 
of the aeroplanes seen, and models of these machines 
have since been built by the members* Leader: Mr. 
R. H. Moodley, 10, Stirling Street, Capetown, Cape 
Province, 



678 






THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



DDDDDnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnDnDnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnna 



a 

D 

a 

D 

□ 
□ 

D 

D 









♦ 



M. 




♦ 



Train 




at Ambergate 



□ 
□ 

□ 

D 

□ 

□ 
□ 

a 

a 
a 



unnnnnnaanDnanDannnnnnDannnnnDnaDnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnannnnnnnnnnnnnpnn 

on to Chesterfield and Sheffield. Some distance away 
from North Junction there is a further divergence 



A MBERGATE Station, Derbyshire, on the Midland 
XxDi vision of the L.M.S., is unusual in having platforms 



ser vin g 
layout. 




of the three 




of a triangular junction 



inside of the triangle the platforms are 
continuous, and as each of the three lines is composed of 
double track there is a corresponding outer platform on 

■•■ i^^^^^V^Bi mM mt >^B 4^m ^mt 

mi mr ^i^B ^m ■ * _■ I ■ A m 



again to the right, 




Junction, where a line 




side. This 









;s Am 




very 

fascinating from the traffic point of view. Further interest 
is added by the fact that there is an alternative route to 
one side of the triangle. This does not serve the station 




but 




by at a little 






carried through a short tunnel in doing so. 

A mb er- 



Each of the five 
North and 




goes off to Codnor Park and Nottingham. 

junctions, South, Station, West, 

s own signal box. With so many 

available the area is a busy one. Ambergate 

is in fact such a "focal point" for traffic that the North 

for train control 





p 

Junction box forms a 




an 





m it 




of 




in the 




area, even those that do not 
Junction, are communicated 




gate from Derby and 
the South there is a 



stretch 



of 



four- road 



track, which at Amber- 
gate South Junction re- 

itself into two 










right 



bearing 

forms the station-avoid- 

previously re- 






through the short Toad- 



moor 




. It was the 
original main line of the 
old North Midland Rail- 






way, one of the original 
constituents that amal- 






gam 




in 



1844 



to 




form the Midland 

. The other route 

s to Station Junc- 
, which forms the 






concern North 

Control Office. 
The work of the South 
Junction box men also 
is important, for this 
junction is the diverg- 



ing 



point 




ween 




for 

■ 

Derby 



traffic 
and 



tester on the one 



hand, 



and 




ween 



Derby and Sheffield on 
the other. 




. 





ween 



St. Pancras and Man- 



chester traverse 

Station 




the 
and 








West 

the same junctions deal 

also with a vast amount 



of 



freight traffic be- 







at 



Derby 



and 



Rowsley sidings. There 







■ 



An interesting view of part of the Ambergate triangle described on this page, showing the Station 
and West Junctions, The train seen in thU illustration Is taking the route to Rowsley and Manchester, 

and has just passed the signal box at West Junction, 

" mm m^^ ^F 



triangular station layout. There the line for Rowsley and 
Manchester turns sharply to the left. This is the curved 
line that is seen in the centre of the illustration on 











station 







>ness of the curve betwe 
necessitates a permanent 



restriction to 15 m.p.h. 

This hue 
ex presses 





the Manchester and St. Pancras 

Division 























the L.M.S., 

Junction. The signal box 

mJ 1 J 

controlling this Junction is visible in the illustration, in 
which it is just to the rear of the train on the Manchester 
route. From Ambergate the line passes on to Rowsley, a 
section that originally formed part of a scheme to connect 
Ambergate with Stockport. It was opened in 1849 and 

the Midland, but was leased three years later 
to the London and North Western and Midland Railways 
In 1871, however, 





are also freight move- 
ments between Rowsley 
and Toton sidings, near 
Nottingham, which follow the Codnor Park route and 
so use the West, North and Crich Junctions. Nottingham 
and Manchester trains also travel this way, and in summer 




is the route for numerous special trains from the 
Midland Districts to Blackpool. 

The platform roads on the eastern curve between 
Station and North Junctions are necessarily used 

as thosu between Derby and 
that require to call at Ambergate. The Toad moor 
Tunnel avoiding line, however, is used by 

The Devonian" 








as 



„ ii 



North and West expresses, such 

and the West of 




w 





c 





via 




and 



Eng 





Through freight trains also 



make use of this avoiding line. The tunnel itself is of 

in section, and has the 







;ained full possession. 

The right-hand route at Station Junction also is 

curving, and a connecting line from West Junction joins 



unusual 



appearance 




e. 



It is 






been flattened on top. 



it at North Junction, thus completing the three sides of 



this interesting trian 
junction it is 




ar 






Just 




the 









moor 







avoiding 
and the right-hand route then leads 



through 



At one time some of the Midland trains from London 
to Manchester actually used the north side of the 
Ambergate triangle. They travelled via Nottingham 

way 

and 







of 

of Codnor Park, 

North Junctions before joining 
Chester route at West Junction. 




Ambergate 
over by way of 




the Derby and Man- 



V 



4 







• 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



679 




o 





□ 

□ 






□ 









Brisker Running on a North Wales 





nnannDaDDnannnnnnnnnnnnnnnDDDDaDDDann 



have previously given descriptions and repro- 
duced photographs of the outdoor layout of Mr. J, 
Southwell and his two sons, of Holyhead, all of whom are 





usiastic 




of the H.R.C. The layout is con 

tin ually being developed and improved, and on this page 
we reproduce a photograph of it in its present form. It is 
non- continuous, and the operations carried out on it are 




ngs 



which 




what 




owners describe as 

■ 



"episodes/' An episode consists of the complete operation 
of one or more main line trains, together with connecting 
trains and through coach services. Prior to the alterations 
referred to, a total of 100 episodes with about 800 trains 



based 



on 



the 




services of the L.M.S. between 



Euston and Holyhead. Branches serve separate terminal 
stations at "Liverpool/' "Manchester" and "Swansea/' 



"Shrewsbury" also plays 
system, and for reasons of 




part in the 
convenience it is 





reen "Stafford" and "Crewe" Stations, 



were run 



d uring 




course of an operating 




This vear it has become possible to increase i he number of 
episodes to 130, and the number of trains run to over 1 , rtrtA " 





The system is in con- 
tinuous operation from 

to October each 



careful preparation is necessary when planning 
services on such a scale, and complete working timetables 
therefore are devised for the whole of the season. From 
these it is possible to tell the position of every locomotive 
and piece of rolling stock at any given 



' i 




e 




g 














. During the winter 
months it is dismantled 
and any reconstruction 

work that may be neces- 
sary is carried out. The 
running season closed at 
the end of last month, 
and this is an appropri- 

time to review 









Extensive track and 
station alterations car- 



ried 



out 



during 





possible 



to 



last 

made it 
operate 



greatly improved ser- 
vices. Shrewsburv sta 




the whole of the period! 

completed time- 
and workine ar- 



The 







rangements are set down 
in a notebook, which is 
a very useful record and 
guide when the arrange- 
ments for another season 
are put in 

Chief reliance for 




motive power is 



placed 



on 




clockwork 



locomotives, 
No. 3C "Royal 
undertake the hardest 




< 



duties, 
appro 



This 




An interesting view on the layout of Mr. J* Southwell, of Holyhead, H.R.C. No* 43JZ3. ikc tram 

represented is the i4 Irish Mail,** and it is hauled by two No. 1 Special Locomotivef 



is very 

in view of 

the employment of the 

on the 

Irish Mails'* of real 



Royal 





tion has been entirely rebuilt. It has now five platforms, 

of which are 8 ft. 6 in. long; in addition there are 
two bays which are 4 ft. 6 in. lone. All the station offices 
and 

include 



rooms 




concentrated on one platform. These 

refreshment rooms, 



tall. 




Improvements also have been made to Holyhead 
Station, which has been completely rebuilt in order to 



represent fairly accurately the layout of the real station. 




e are two covered platforms, each 9 ft. in 



lengt h , 



one being on each side of the harbour, as in actual 

The baseboard between the quays has been 




painted 
speci 




to 










on it are 




constructed models of the L.M.S, mail steamers 




■ 

and "Ca 



m 




»» 



Crewe Station has been enlarged by the addition of 



a third platform. 





ee platforms are 




in, 
and each is 7 ft. long. There are two main line platforms, 
and the third one is used for branch line connections and 
local trains to 

As a result of these 




and 










traffic 




of the 





engineering 

has been increased 



the 







different kinds of services are run, representing respec 



tively the Winter and Summer week-day services and the 
corresponding Sunday services for both seasons. For each 

of service there are various different erouos of 





. The Hornby "Scots" are well supported by two 
No. 1 Special Locomotives, which represent the numerous 




real L.M.S. engines of class 



f f 



5X. 



j 1 



A favourite arrange- 




ment with very heavy trains is to use the two No. 1 
Specials together, and "the photograph on this page 
this practice in operation. Other engines include a No. O 
Tender Locomotive and various Hornby Tanks ranging 



from a No. 2 Special to one of the 





es are of course parti 




The Tank 

■ 

for operat 




the various branch and connecting: services that 



for 



b 



m an important featui of the working of the line. 



For the passenger train services 

of Hornby No. 




use is 


















short four-w 




vehicle 



s 



fitting 



in better with the 



general scheme of things than bogie stock, and allowing 




number 




through coaches 



services has been 
1 vehicles to 
Freight services 




to be worked, 
with the mail 
of these No. 




■ 



mail stowage vans, 
are run, and their 



made to dovetail into the passenger 
a realistic manner. The planning of 



arrange 




is 

in 





for these trains and the provision of suitable engines 

for all of them cannot be a task to be undertaken li 













his colleagues have 



but Mr. Southwell 

reduced this sort of thing to a fine art! 





680 



TH E M ECCAN O MAGAZINE 




GETTING READY FOR WINTER TRAFFIC 




HIS time of the year is a very busy one on 







i- now 




extensions usxu 




are 



planned and improvements made to allow the running of 
better or more intensive services. Before putting these in 



a 




of the track of 




layouts is 




hand, however, it is advisable to ove 




the 




equipment in order to make sure that it will give satisfac 
tion in the work ahead. A little attention now may save 
much disappointment and annoyance when the winter 
running programme commences. 
The track must be in good order if successful operations 

should be 




are to be carried out, and the rails 

carefully examined. On a permanent layout this inspec- 



to cause 

them to open out. They should be closed up carefully 
with a small pair of pliers, a spare pin being inserted in 
the rail head while the pliers are beifkg'used. There is then 
no difficulty in restoring the rail ends to their 
shape with holes of the correct size for the pins 

Rails that have been out of use for some time probablv 




will be 
deposit 




Their heads may show traces of a black 

of oil and dust picked up by the 



wheels during service. This also may collect on the wheel 




of engines and rolling stock, 





excessive causes 



tion 



is 



ea 





a 



if allowed to 



woolly" and unsatis 



made. The 





will not require 
any adj usf ment 



of 



level, 



but 



should be test 






ed to see that it 

correct 



1 s 



to gauge. This 
can be done on 
an electric lay- 
out by means of 



combined 

auge, 




the 

Rail 

Screwdriver 
and Spanner 
that is packed 

with all Hornby 




factory run 



nmg 



It is 




Electric 



Loco 



The Hornby Locomotive "Princess Elizabeth" on a heavy express train made up of No. 2 Corridor Coaches. The appearance 

of this train is typical of that of many L.M.S. expresses of real practice. 



easily removed 

from the rails 

and the wheels 
by wiping them 
with a rag that 
has been dipped 
in a very 

quantity of 

petrol, and the 
improvement in 

running 

will follow 

makes this 

really worth 

while. The 
trol must not 

used near a 





fire 



or 



flame 



motives. On clockwork railways the winding key handle 
of Hornby Clockwork Locomotives forms a rail gauge for 

track. On sliding either of these 
rails of Hornby Track, defective places are detected 
immediately, and the rails should be eased apart gently 







where they may be tight, A layout that is only put down 
when required should be tested in a similar manner. It is 
best to lay down the rails to form a track, for it is much 
easier and quicker to examine rails and other track 
components in position than to test them 

The laying down of the line in this manner will show 




up any loss of the connecting pins fitted at the ends of the 
rails. Those that are loose should be tightened up by 
pinching the rail head carefully with a pair of pliers, and 
missing pins 



Special attention should be given to the mechanical 



portions of 




su 




as the 




rail units and 



points levers. Care should be taken to see that the switch 
rails are in correct alignment with the fixed rails, which- 

are thrown. Sometimes a little 

in order to 






should be replaced before running 



The pins can be obtained 





and 




orary 



or haphazard substitutes should not be used as they 
are very unsatisfactory. 



The rail hea 









ms 





the 







receive the pins also should be 
uent putting together and taking 



ever way the 

setting with a pair of pliers is 

ce the points just right for smooth running. 
Crossings can scarcely get out of order, but it is just as 
well to look them over at the same time as the rest of the 

■ 

rails. In particular the rail ends should be examined and, 
if necessary, dealt with in the manner already described. 
Buffer Stops and other accessories that are connected 
to the track should be examined and cleaned at the same 
time. Cleaning accessories usually means simply dustin 




them, and for this pxirpose an ordinary paint brush of the 

ti ft • _ j_ * e \ t j * * j 



mop 



van 




is very useful. It can reach into corners 



where a rag cannot penetrate, and a more satisfactory 
job is the result. 

The connections from the power supply to the track 



should be examined, and any 




contacts tightened. 



* 



* 




9 





THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



681 



Plug connections that may have become loose in their 



sockets can be adjusted by placing the 



knife, 



or a 




screwdriver, in 









g oper 
engine should 







ion. When all dirt has been removed the 




allowed to stand until the 




has 



order to separate slightly the two sections of the fitting. 
Connections that are made by means of terminals, such 
as those on electrically-illuminated accessories, should be 

examined 
and tighten- 



evaporated, leaving the mechanism clean and drv. Light 



lubrication 
wheels with 




various 










ax 



oil should then be undertaken. The 



use of too thick an oil is a frequent cause of slu 



m 



ish 



ed up if nec- 



Ter- 
Con- 



essary. 

minal 

n e c t i n 

Plates or 

Combined 
Switch Rails 







new fuses, 

is import- 
ant that the 
fuse wire 

* -. 

in 

instruc- 
tions packed 
with each 





running. 

Meccano 

Graphite 
Grease can be 

applied with 

advantage 

the 

coils of the 
spring. 

The clean- 
ing and ex- 
amination of 




tenders 



and 



rolling stock 



5 






is equally im- 
portant if the 

best results 
are to be ob- 



Homby EleC- Fine fun on a Hornby layout! Before commencing regular operations for the winter season it is advisable to examine and attend t a i n C d . A 

trie Loco- * """" "" """■" "" 



to the various components of the layout as described in this article. 



little 



motive and each Meccano Transformer should be used. 

e the track and its accessories are in order, atten- 





tion can be devoted to 




e engines 




rolling 




Electric locomotives should be given a good general 
examination and particular attention should be paid 



to the wheel treads and collector shoes. If these have 






. . 






any black deposit on them they should be cleansed with 
petrol, as already explained. It is not advisable to 
interfere with the brushes of the motors, but the com- 
mutator should be cleaned in the manner described in the 
locomotive instruction leaflets, that is by passing a piece 

rolled round a matchstick through 




ing here, a little adjustment there, or a spot of Meccano 
Oil or Graphite Grease on the bearings frequently works 



wonders with a wagon or coach that does not move easily. 
Sometimes it is necessary to remove the wheels to get rid 
of dust or fluff that may have collected between them and 



the axle-guards or bogie frames. The petrol rag should 



again be used here, and the axles and wheel treads can be 

cleaned up at the same time. Those vehicles that are fitted 

with axle-boxes should have the supply of Graphite Grease 
. ... 




for the purpose in 
the brush gear side 

ate. The 

paper is allowed to 




renewed before the wheels are replaced in position. 
Some of the couplings of various vehicles may want a 
little attention. They may not be moving freely on their 

pivots. Sometimes 
couplings get bent 

so that 




bear 



on 



the 



com 




en 



mutator while the 

■ 

wheels of 
gine are tui 
hand. 



■ 








Particular care 

be taken 

with the lubrica- 




■ 






tion of the moving 
parts of the en- 
gines. An excess of 
oil is to be a void- 
its 
the 





are 















and 



this 





.1 

on 




to 



An interesting gooos yard scene with a fast freight train passing through on the main line. The various Dinky Toy 

Components in the foreground add considerably to the realism of the layout. 



ed, as thi 
way 

wheels and other places where it is not wanted. If any 
repairs or renewals are necessary the 




mo 






be sent to the Service Department at Meccano Ltd., full 
details of the defects accompanying each engine. 

clockwork locomotive should be 

D . . 

remove any old oil 



The mechanism 

ith 




m 





washed out wi 

that may be in it, together with accumulated dust that 

would tend to prevent the free working of the engine. This 
should be done out of doors, and awav from fires or 
flames. The petrol can be introduced into the mechanism 

kept specially for the purpose, and it 

to assist the 




a 





is a good plan to 




a small paint 




and on their correct 








that 




us 




ent 




are bent up or down, 



causes them to be 

. The 
lings of all 

should be examin- 
ed and any slight 
ad j us t m en t s c ar- 
ried out. The satis- 
factory engage- 
ment of the auto- 
matic couplings 
depends a 

deal on their 

dom of movement 
should be straight. 




owing 



to 



"rough 
shunts" or other causes, should be straightened 



with a small 



■ 

The 

sones i 



exa 




to 



out 




adjustment of acces- 

s as important as that of rolling stock if the system 

is to be smart and efficient. For instance, the working 



parts of 





ated by means of the Hornby Con 



of those that may be oper- 




correctly 




us 




System, must be 





drop of oil applied to 



these or to such parts as the Control Lever Frame makes 
a big difference to the ease of operation. 



682 

□□□□DDDDdO 

D 
□ 

□ 

a 






AZ1NE 





n 



Join the Hornby Rail- 
way Company and 
become -eligible 
the 



for 




com petitions an* 
nounced on this page. 




□□□□□□□□□□□ 



annnnDnnDnn 



n 




COMPETITION 





□ 

a 

a 

a 

□ 

□ 

a 






D 




□ 






nnnnnnnann 



R A IL W A Y 




VOTING CONTEST 



an 




Join the Hornby Rail 
way Company and Q 

become digibl* 

the competitions an- 




□ 

no u wed on thi$ page. LJ 

D 

naanannnnna 



Many splendid entries were 

Summer Series of "Railway 

last of 

Several 
already 




was announced 




in the 

the 

issue. 



believe it will be the popular choice. They should 



give it the position in which they think it will be 
by the massed votes of all the competitors. 




ha v e 
been 



reproduced on 
the "Railway 

N e ws' ' 

of the "MM 




t* 



and 



on 



this 



page we give 
nine others, all 
of which won 



prizes 



T hese 



nine photo 



graphs 



form 



the basis of an 
interesting 

competition in 

which every 





take 





corn- 
is asked 
e on a 

postcard A, 

the photo- 
graph he likes 




There are two 
sections in the 



contest, 

Home 



for 

and 





verseas mem- 



s respective- 



ly, and in each 

three prizes 
consisting of 
any 




products 

manufactured 

i 

by Meccano 

the 

of 
and 

be 

In 



to 

values 



21/ 
10/6 



15/ 

will 



awarded. 

addition there 

will be several 
consolation 

prizes, and in 

the event of a 



tic 



for 



award 




any 
will 



be 



divided 



best of all, taking into account their railway interest and 
their merit as photographs, and B, his idea of the order of 



popularity of the photographs as decided by the massed 






votes of all the com 








etitors should denote each photograpl 




t) 



number marked on it. Entrants need not place their own 
favourite photograph at the head of list B, unless they 



equally between the successful 



■ 



Postcards 





be addressed "H.R.C. Voting Con- 



6 



test, 



u 




cano Ltd., Binns Road, Liverpool, 13, and each 




name, 



and H.R.C. 

The closing 

dates in the Home and Overseas Sections are 30th 



competitor must write 
membership number at the end of 




November 





i 



February, 1938, respectively. 



Layout Planning Contest 

In this contest we are asking members to 
submit designs for layouts based on a main 



line oval, of either double or single track. 



to the values of 2 



Entries 
Novernb 



must 



be 




and 10/6 
"H.R.C 



Layout 



Planning 



Co 



>> 



Two terminal stations, 




and any 



other features necessary to make a model 



railway 




passenger and 




traffic 
ed 




Meccano Ltd., Binns Road, Liverpool 13, 
and the closing dates in the Home and 
Overseas Sections are 30th November and 

28th 
competitor 




1938, respectively. Each 
name, address and H.R.C. 



practicable and interesting may be a 
but the maximum space allowed is 15 ft. 
long and 10 ft. wide. In order to give 



number must be written on the back of 
his entry. 




competitors free scope 

outs no cost restrictions 





?njng 







Scale drawings are 



preferable 




purpose; and a scale of one inch to one foot 
is a convenient one; but members who do 



not care to make 





should 



indicate the position pf each mil by short 
cross lines, in the same way as is done in the 




* 



Hornby Layouts — 100 Sugges- 
tions." Entries will be judged on their real- 
ism and on their possibilities for railway 

wor kin g. 

The contest will be divided into the usual 
two sections, Home and Overseas, and in 
each will be awarded prizes consisting of any 
products manufactured by Meccano Ltd., 



COMPETITION SOLUTION 

"July Missing Links Contest* 



"Sir Frederick Harrison" 5531, 4-6-0, "Patriot," 
L.M.S.; "Dumbleton Halt," 4920, 4-6-0, "Hall," 
G.W.R.; "Dunraven Castle," 4092, 4-6-0, "Castle," 
G.W.R.; "Sir Sum Fay," 5423, 4-6-0, "Sir Sam Fay, 
B2 '" L.N.E.R.; "Glasgow Yeomanry" 5158, 4-6-0, 

"5P5F Standard Mixed Traffic," L.M.S.; "Sir John 



'Princess 




"Mans Meg," 2004, 2-8-2, "Cock o' the North, P2," 
E.N.E.R.; "Loch Rannock? 4698, 2-6-0, "K2," 
L.N.E.R.; "Lady Patricia.; 1 6210, 4 6-2, 
Roval," L.M.S.; u Broughion Grange:* 6S05, 4-6-0, 
"Grange," G.W.R., or "Broughton Castle," 5033, 
4-6-0, "Castle," G.W.R.; "Queen Guinevere" 454, 
4-6-0, "King Arthur, N15," S.R.; "The Dougal 
ur," 9400, 4-4-0, "Scott, D30," L.N.E.R.; "West 
Ham United," 2872, 4-6-0, "Suinlringham, 
L.N.E.R.; "Henrv Oakley," 3990, 4-4-2, 
L.N.E.R.; " ■BaUindalloeh Castle ," 14676, 4-6-0, "Castle, 
H.R.," I.M.S.; "St. Johnstown," 9901, 4-1-2, "Cll," 
L.N.E.R.; "DugaUt Dalgetty," 9414, 4-4-0, "Scott, 
D30," L.N.E.R.: "Hackworth," 2328, 4-6-0, "Re- 
membrance, Nl5X t " S.R.; "Cefntttla Court," 2936, 

'Saint," G.W.R.; "Viscount Churchill," 111. 

"Castle," G.W.K.; "Prince Henrv," 5429, 



B17," 

"C2," 



4-6-0, 

4-6-0, 




M 



V," S.R.; "Merlin," 4486. 4-6-2, "A4," L.N.E.R., 

or "Merlin," 740, 4-6-0, "King Arthur, N15," S.R., 
or "Merlin," 3259, 4-4-0. "Duke," G.W.R., Or 
"Merlin? 85, 4-4-0, "V," C.N.R.(I); "Selkirkshire. 
2756, 4-4-0. "Shire, D49," L.N.E.R.; "The Stainion- 
" 376, 4-4-4), "Hunt, D49." L.N.E.R.; "Moor 
25371, 4-4-0, "George the Fifth," L.M.S. f or 




Hen, 



4-4-0, "Director, D10," L.N.E.R., or "Prince Henry" 

4043, 4-6-0, "Star," G.W.R.; "Clan Mackenzie," 

14768, 4-6-0, "Clan, H,R.," L.M.S.; "Loch Ericht," 
1 4381, 4-4-0, "Loch,H.K.,"L. M.S. ,"Queen A lexawira," 
5104, 4-4-0, "Alexander, D9," L.N.E.R.; or "Queen 
Alexandra," 4032, 4-6-0, "Castle," G.W.R., or 
"Queen Alexamira," 87, 4-4-0, "Castle, U2/' L.M.S. 
(N.C.C.); "Baron of Bradwardine," 6379, 4-4-0, 
"Director, Dll," L.N.E.R.; "The Green Knight," 754, 
4-6-0, "King Arthur, N15," S.R.; "Sir Robert Home," 
4066, 4-6-0, 'Star," G.W.R.; "Green Arrow," 4771, 
2-6-2, "Green Arrow, V2," L.N.E.R.; "Soutiicsk; v 
«854. 4-4-0, "D40," L.N.E.R., or "Countess," 823. 
0-6-0T, G.W.R.; "Prince Rupert," 567 J, 4-6-0, 
"Jubilee," L.M.S.; "Coldstream Guardsman," 6114. 
4-6-0, "Roval Scot," L.M.S.; "Kmg John." 6026, 
4-6-0. "King." G.W.R.; "Lord President," 2003, 

"Cock o' the North, P2," L.N.E.R.; "Sutton 




If 



!! 



tfelthorpe," 5439, 4-6-0, "Glenalmond, B8," L.N.E.R. 







MECCANO MAGAZINE 



683 





I 



Branch 







ws 



Dover. — Good attendances have en- 
abled intensive track operations to be 

carried out. The layout on one occasion 
was divided into sections, and looked very 
realistic with three and four trains running 
at the same time. S.R. passenger services 
have been reproduced in miniature, and 



were made specially 




ing by the 



introduction of a through G.W.R. coach 



to Birkenhead. 




coach has been 



painted in correct colours by members. 
Photographs of railway interest taken 





of the h op-p ick i n g 
traffic on the Branch 



by members this summer were ex- 
hibited .and discussed at one meetiner. 

commencement of the Winter 

Session was heralded by a complete 
overhaul of the Branch equipment. 
Secretary: D. F. E. Moore, 3, St. John's 
Road, Dover. 

Waterloo (Dublin). — Following the 

commencement 

season , 

layout increased considerably, and ser 

vices and trains often had to be trebled, 

The Branch locomotives are running 
very well, and their efficient operation 
amply rewards members for their care 
in overhaul and repair work. Secretary: 
S. B. Carse, 38, Oakley Road, Ranelagh, 
Dublin. 

Hornsea. — Interesting track opera- 
tions have been carried out by the 
Junior and Senior Sections of this 



Branch. 




of 



* 



various 
have been laid, down, and 



the 




of specialised 




c, such 



running 
as milk and 



sheep trains, has proved of 



great 



interest. Secretary: 



P 




Richardson, 

North. 



"Summerleigh," 
H ornsea. 

First Sheffield, — Excursions to 
places of railway interest have con- 
tinued. On a recent trip to Manchester, 
members Realised the meaning of the 

"packed like sardines in a 

tin;" for in their compartment were 19 

passengers, one dog and two ferrets! 
The outing was voted very enjoyable, 
however. Retford was the scene of 





for future meetings are being discussed 

campaign is to 
Branch layout is 

prepared for winter working, A new 
station and engine shed have been added, 
and the main line track has been doubled. 
Two new corridor coaches and a new 






Northampton.- — Several members re- 
cently spent an extremely enjoyable 
afternoon at Birmingham. The 
Engine Sheds were first visited. There the 




© 






hand-operated coaling plant was inspected, 
and several locomotives of various types 



were 





also have been acquired, 
visit has been paid to the Model Engineer 




to detailed examination. 

The offer of a short trip on the footplate of 
"Bingley """ L, ~ —' s ~ 




was an 



agreeable surprise, 





of which members took full advantage. 
Members also saw a streamlined Diesel 
railcar undergoing tests. Tea in the city 
completed an interesting afternoon. The 
Branch summer camp Was a great 
success. It was . well attended, and 
members had great fun. Secretary: P. C. 

, Sandringham 



Collier 



33 




Northampton, 



The /winter Session has 

been commenced with renewed en- 




are now 



thusiasm. Track 

carried out very efficiently owing to the 

special system employed. Concise rules 




instructions 









con 




with each official 



up m 




and these are strictly enforced. Members 
are divided into three grades, according 
to their ability. To rise from one class 

must carry out 
exacting nature 





to 

certain duties 

without fault. Secretary: 

28, St. John's Road, Exeter. 




Fen wick, 




A new G.W.R. 0-4-0 
tank locomotive has been purchased, and 
now operates all passenger trains on the 



Branch 




The hauling of 




trains and shunting work is carried out 

locomotive. All 

and 



in 





by a G.W.R 

rolling stock has been 

trains now look very realistic. A visit has 

been paid to Folkestone Harbour, where 

boat trains and Channel steamers were 

viewed with great interest, Dover Engine 

Sheds also have been visited, and here 



some 



14 



locomotives 



were 




Mr. R. Croall, Chairman of the St Giles' Cathedral (Edinburgh) H.R.C 
Branch No. 272, snapped in a happy moment during a visit to the 
Rosyth Naval Dockyard. This Branch was incorporated in August 

1934, and now has a membership of over 100. 



inspected. Secretary: F. E. Saunders, 
79, Dover Street, Folkestone, Kent. 

St. Stephens (Salt ash). — The first 
track meetings of the new Session have 







another outing, and the "Coronation" 
express was again seen there. The Winter 



Exhibition at the 



Session began with a 




i 




at which 



interesting track operations were carried 

out. Secretary: \\\ H. Hun hmson, ;*•>. 

Linden Avenue, Sheffield 8. 

Wandsworth No. 1. — After many weeks 
of preparatory work, the film "Fruitful 

"by the 




Exchange " was made 
Branch, The filming took several hours. 
Members carried out their parts splendidly 
and trains were run on the Branch layout 





The film 
and the satis- 



with splen 
developed 

faction of seeing it on a screen amply 

rewarded members for their work. Plans 




Hall. 



Secretary: A. H. St, Walker, 6Sa, Oakmead 
Road, Balham, S.W.17. 

Islington. — Good progress is being made 

in the construction of scale model track, 
and the main terminus station is near ing 
completion. This will be 6 ft. long and have 
four platforms. A scissors crossover point 

has been completed, and attention is now 



outstanding for the keenness of 

members, and train operations have been 
carried out with much greater efficiency and 
accuracy than previously. Games have been 

Secretary; 




at 





being 




to the 




s 




m 



Preparations continue for 



signalling 




e 



Exhibition to be held on the 27th of this 
month in St. Giles' Hall. Details of this are 




given on page 676. 

Straker, 48, Onslow Gardens, 

Hill, London. N.10. 




B. Braund, 9, Homer Park, Saltash. 

Branches in Course of Formation 

The following new Branches of the 
Hornby Railway Company are at present in 

process of 




rmation, and any boys who are 
interested and desirous of linking up with 
this unique organisation should communi- 
cate with the promoters, whose names 
and addresses are given below. 

G . La mbden , " Co ve- 



Leatherhea 

it 




■ 




Barry 



* 



Fir Tree Road. 







R 




39 



Broad Street. 



684 




MECCANO 






TS 




e 



Extra 



20 

1 

5 

3 
5 

3 
20 

3 

1 

20 

15 

5 

4 

5 

3 
20 

25 
30 



Australia 

»i •, Jubilee 
Brit, Guiana 

•» i» Cor 

Barbados 

Cor* ... 
Canada 

tl Jubilee ,,. 



it 



♦• * 




. . . 



**. 



Egypt... 
Ecuador 

Esthonia *.. 
Cameroons 
Fiji Is, 

•t tt t>or* 
French Cols. 



* i m 



i *# 



ft 



fl 



tl 



**# 

•fl * * 



6d. 
id. 
3d, 

II- 
2d. 

1/* 
6d. 

4d. 
2d. 

<5d. 

6d. 
2d, 
2d. 

3d. 

3d. 

4d. 
5d. 



3 
3 

20 

15 

4 
5 

5 
5 

10 

5 
5 

5 

4 
10 



« II 



• ft 



4 i + 



Gibraltar 

Cor 
Guadeloupe 

Greece 

Guatemala 

Gaboon *•■ 

Hayci.i. 

Honduras ... 
Hong Kong 



in 









*- * 



It 




• t 



II 



#*« 




§*• 



Ugan. &. Tan. 
Latvia 

Lebanon 

Labuaci 

Malay 



■ »* 



9 *■ 



*««. 



*#* 



I - * 



»■ ■ 



,.T 



2d. 

2d. 
4d. 

2d. 
3d. 
2d. 
2d. 
5d. 

2d. 
3d. 

3d. 

2d. 

2d. 
6d. 
5d. 










ESTHONIA 
Dl 





LATVIA 





NT 



STAM 





This 



offer 



collection 



J. RU 




i 



23. SHANKIIN DRIVE. WESTCLIFF-ON-SEA. 




ONE THOUSAND STAMPS 

ON 

From which you may select any 100 for 3/-* 
This selection is not made up of the very commonest 
varieties, but contains stamps catalogued at 1/* 

each or more* (1 do not sell less than 100,1 



SPECIAL OFFEfl; 50 diff. SCANDINAVIA 11- pose free. 
A returnable deposit of £1 is required from overseas 

applicants. 

H. HARiY, "Hoyland,'' Potter Heigham. Norfolk. 



wonderful otter comprises sets of stamps that will enhance the value of your 
Slovakia (President Masaryk), Holland [JamboreeJ, set old Canadians and Australians including King 
China [Sun Yat Sen), Philippine Isles and I Map stamps, A fine unused Morocco Coronation issue 

of old Belgium and Japan* All absolutely FREE. Just send -Id. postage, requesting approvals 

and free Catalogue. Collections purchased lor prompt cash, 

LISBURN & TOWNSEND LTD. (MM), LIVERPOOL 



C2ccho* 
George, 

and set 









CORONATION 
COLONIALS 



To 



a 





stamp collectors sending 












postage (abroad 6d.) Limited supply. 

. KEEF, Willingdon, Eastbourne 



THE 



a 



DIAMOND 



V! 



PACKET 




THE 



ONLY 







OF UNS0RTED STAMPS ON THE MARKET with 15 years* reputation behind it. It contains appro*. 1,000 UN- 
SORTED STAMPS I'rom Convents abroad. MANY RARE STAMPS have been found tn it, 1 pkt„ 1/6; 3 pkts., 3/9: 

5 pkts., 6f-. All post free inland. Postage to Colonies 3d. per pkt. extra. Foreign, 6d. extra. 

Ask your stationer for the "Diamond" packet. 



SPECIAL TURKS ISLANDS JUBILEES complete set: used or unused. 5/6. 







NERUSH (Dept. A), 68, TURNPIK 





I 



H0RNSEY, LONDON 



f 



N.8. 






m- 



PACKET 





This marvellous packet ts offered under cost as an advertisement, 45 different Stamps 

each with a ship on it. A regular armada. K0UANG-TCHE0U, new, SENE6AL (Canoe), 
wonderful flotilla of caravels from DENMARK (complete set). NEW CALEDONIA. 

UKRAINE. COSTA RICA, a fleet of 7 CHINESE junks usually sold at lOd.. TRINI0AD & TOBAGO. MAURITIUS, KENYA-TAN- 

, NEWFOUNDLAND. U.S.A., B. GUIANA, et of S. AFRICA, GREECE. POLAND, IND0 CHINA, FRENCH OCEANIA. 

WALLIS & FUTUNA ISLANDS, etc. Price 4id.. postage IJd. (abroad 3d. extra). Purchasers of this packet asking 
for approvals receive FREE set of 3 SPAIN {Columbus, each with his ship on it), Senders of addresses of --tamp ■ 

collectors receive FREE set of 6 VENEZUELA or 6 PERSIA. 100 BRITISH COLONIALS 1/-. 20 AIRP0ST 6d.. 

6 TRIAN6ULARS 7d.. 50 PERSIA 4/-, 9 POLAND New Pictorials 8d.. VOLUMES OF B.0.*'- CHEAP. 






W ATKINS (M. Dept,), Granville lUad 



r 



BARNET 




THE FIRST STAMP Ever Issued 

(British 1840 Penny Black) for P.O. 3/6. It is guaran- 
teed genuine in every respect. Its companion stamp 
(1840, 2d* blue) for a further 5/9 (cat, 17/6)1 Other 
•'Classics'* which every Collector should have arc the 

Cape of Good Hope Triangutars; we offer Id* rose (cat* 

40/-) for 12/6; 4d. blue (cat. 15/-] for 5/-; and 6d. pale 
lilac (cat. 40/-) at 15/-. Superb approvals of any 
country against approved English References or a 

deposit. Full Lists Free. 

NQRRIS & CO. (Dent. M), Norwood. London, S.E.I 9. 






IMPROVED 



THE "MYSTIC 



II 



PACKET 








UNKNOWN 

UNUSUAL 
UNSORTED 

(over 200 diff* guaranteed,] 

- ■ 

on paper, etc., just as received from 
Convents, Missions* Banks, etc* Guaranteed 
unpicked* Chance of a FIND in every lot. 
Send io*day for your treasure hunt to-morrow. 
3 for 4/3, 6 for 8/». Abroad, extra postage. 

FREE! 15 Br. Cols.* including CORONATIONS, to 

Approval applicants. Also FREE EXCHANGE, 
Enclose ptge* Overseas 3d. Dealers Supplied. 

ASTLEY & CO. 
CM.2), NEWB0LDS. WOLVERHAMPTON. 



Coronation Packets to suit All Pockets 

Different. 9d. 17 Different. 1f6. 24 Different, 2/4. 

36 Different. 3/5. 42 Different. 4/3. 

One Variety from each of the 45 Colonics(45 Stamps] 5/- 
135 Different [3 from each of the 45 Colonies) 







THE 1938 EDITION OF TH 




STANDARD CATALOGUE OF POSTAGE 
STAMPS OF THE WORLD 



PROFUSELY ILLUSTRATED AND COMPLETELY REVISED. 

This new edition will include quotations for the Jubilee and 

Coronation stamps, as well as those of the Spanish Revolu- 
tionary Government, and all other new issues received up 
to the time of going to press. 

Start the season well 



PRICE 





placing your order now, or ask 
for descriptive leaflet and free copies of our interesting 




price lists. 

WHITFIELD KINC & CO 



Postage Six- 
pence extra 

(Abroad IQd.) 



# 



IPSWICH 



SUFFOLK. Est. 1869 








/ 




A fine packet, mostly large pictorials commemorating famous men and event? from Italy (Mussolini, Fascism 
and History); Greece (Tuberculosis!; Sweden (Postal); j. Slavia [Independence); Russia (Revolution); Denmark 

(Hans Andersen), etc., ccc< — Lastly a fine set of 6 Czechoslovakia Legionaires usually sold at 6d* 



This marvellous packet free to every genuine applicant for my approvals. These books contain the finest 






variety at the very lowest possible prices* thus enabling you to buy TWO stamps instead of one 
A trial will convince you # 



Just send 2d. for postage, etc., and I will reply by return, 

PHILIP COCK RILL, 13, MONTRELL ROAD, STREATHAM HILL, LONDON, S.W.2. 



100 DIFFERENT STAMPS FREE to applicants for Id. 
approvals. Cox, 14, Btoadmead Av. # Worcester Park. 



— 



complete >•• ... ... ••• .*. £1/7/6 

Single Country sets at 6d. 9 7d* f 8d.* 9d., lOd. and lid* 
per set. Write for List (free). Gash with Order. All 

Postage Extra, 

EDWARD SAN DELL, 10, Evelyn Grove, Southall. Mddx. 



EGYPT— Conference 




Montreux 



These new Commemoratives have arrived* 

MINT SET OF 3 at 1/3. 
OTHER MINT C0MMEM0RATIVES: 



4 Antigua "Jub.' 1 
3 



49 1 




'n" 



3/9 

8d. 



4 Bechuanal'd "Jub." 2/6 

2 Egypt "Medical" ... 9d. 

3 Egypt "Navigation" 2/3 

Cash with order. 



3 Egypt "Cotton" ... 2/. 

4 Falkland* "Jub." ... 3/9 

3 Gibraltar "Cor'n" Bd. 

4Kewfoundrd"Jub."3!9 

4 Nauru "Cor'n" ... 2/3 
Postage extra. 



5 UNUSED CORONATION STAMPS FREE. Post 2d 

Sanders, 90, Newlands Avenue 



• 




»■'•■; Vvv 



VALUE 




. 






.V, 



H. L. G0MM. 41. Upper Oranbrook Roail. Bristol, 6. 



MOROCCO. K.E.VIII Complete Mint (111 1J3; 

Coronation Mint i'3) 6d.; Used 3d. 
NEW ZEALAND. 'Chamber of Commerce* complete 

Mine (5) 3/3. 
CORONATION. Crown Colonies complete Mint 26/6 

Dominions comp. 39/6. C.C- and Pom. comp. 65/- 
MINT SETS. Cooks, Niuc or New Zealand 1/2 ea. 
USED SETS. Solomons. Nine 1/9 ea,: Falkknds, 
Malta I0(f. ea. Trinidad, Turks or Barbados 11d. ea. 

Full lists on request. 
100 PERSIA Different [inch Air and Coronation] 2/9 

FREE Set (6) GEORGIA to 5 Roubles to genuine 
*" ^ applicants for approvals of keen value- 

" ^nations, Jubilees and Pictorials. 

T. R. HUGHES (P.T.S.), 
'IBIS COTTAGE/ LONG PARK. AMERSHAM. 



COLONIES 



Take advantage of this stupendous FREE OFFER 
of a collection of 40 BRITISH COLONIALS including 
besides Pictorial and Coronation issues, stamps 
of no less than five Monarchs, Also included you 
will find an INDIAN set with Government Service 
stamp all showing Elephants; pictorial AFRICAN 
set depicting the 'Drommedctris* and Union BJdgs, 



*t 




Ea; CEYLON; AUSTRALIAN set; complete 





Coronation issue of CANADA showing King George 
VI and Queen Elizabeth; NEWZEALAND set t 
ins; famous Admiral stamp; the allegorical 'Sword 
of Light 1 on l.F.S. item; an early K. Edward Vll set 
trori CANADA and in addition one of the oldest 
stamps in the world, a beautiful Queen Victoria 
emission from GREAT BRITAIN. All the above and 
more as well can be yours FREE by sending us 2d, 
stamps to cover post, etc, (abroad 6dJ and request- 
ing approvals. 

WINDSOR STAMP CO. 
(Dept. M), 59, LEI ROAD, BLACKHEATH, 5.E.3* 



< 




» 






685 



v 




NATIVE LIFE ON STAMPS 



3 






NE of the many fascinations of stamp collecting is that the 
collector can sit at home in a comfortable arm chair, and roam 
the world in fancy as his stamps bring to him vivid glimpses of the 

world's affair?:. We are all interested in 



o 








the people of other countries, their 




ngs, their 




umes, 




habits and 




customs, and our 



A native potter. 



interest is perhaps keenest in races still 

living in primitive conditions. The 

stamp album is full of pictures of such 
peoples, and those who wish to make a 
collection of designs featuring native 
life and customs have enough material 
available to keep them occupied 
for quite a long time. 

alone presents 



series of 1923 provides a striking range of designs illustrating these 
pursuits, and it is interesting to note that the border frames of all 
the stamps in this series are based 
on typical native art. 

The potters of the Belgian Congo 
tribes are mainly women. They dig 





a large 

field that in the present article we shall deal only with stamps from 
that continent. A random glance at African stamps in the album 



out 

shape 

the 



firing 




from the river beds. 

out 






material and 

in the sun* The 





the clav is done over 
log fires. The Handing© men shown 

to whom we 

are 




on Liber i an 

have referred bri c fl \ 

noted for their skill in 




in 




ei 




c I ot hes 







1 

er work, 





Weaving on a band loom. 




in metal work. 

Although the majority of African tribes to-day live peacefully. 



most of them maintain 




forces. A 




Warrior with 



Belgian 




reveals portraits of members of many tribes. 
Congo issues are particularly rich in this 
showing both men and women of natives of various 

Mandingo men are to be found on Liberia's 




stamp of 1918. There is a native of Somaliland on 
Eritrea's 10c. issue of 1930, and a Ruanda dancer and 
a pair of Vrundi women figure on the 5 fr. and 1 fr, 
stamps of Ruanda — Urundi's issue of 1931. A Moorish 
horseman is shown on the Spanish Moroccan Express 
issue of 1928, and a 1 1 ansa native on the upper Volta 
2c. issue of 1928. 

The elaborate hairdressing of some of the women 
shown on these stamps is of special interest. For in- 
stance, the Ubangi woman's coiffure is a remarkable piece of work, 
achieved by first soaking the hair in palm oil and then treating it 
with a surface coating of camwood dust. It is built 
up to last for several months without re-dressing. 

any African tribes still live in huts of mud and 
straw, some even in rudely constructed shelters in 
trees. Typical native huts built of woven mats of straw 

town on several stamps of Tchad's 1930 issue. 
Liberia's 25c. of 1909 shows a type of straw-thatched 

L 

hut 




tattooed face and feathered headdress is shown on the 
low values of Gaboon 's 1 910 series. The lance-like spear 
1 his warrior carries is a particularly deadly weapon, ft 

is not thrown, but is used in much the same way as 
modern infantry troops use the bayonet. 

With many tribes, bows and arrows are the prin- 
cipal weapons of offence, and a typical archer is shown 
on the 50c. stamp of the Belgian Congo's 1923 issue. 
The mariner in which the Congo archers use their bows 
is unusual. When a victim has been marked down, the 

bow string is pulled sharply, causing it to emit a loud 



Kafifir huts. 






is similar to the huts commonly found in 

villages in the Mozambique country, seen on the £c. 

stamp of the Mozambique Company's 1918 issue. 

Better known types of dwellings are the baked-mud 

Kaffir huts shown on S.W. Africa's 5/- issue of 1931, 

and the native kraals pictured on the 15c. and 25c. 

stamps of the Belgian Congo 1931 series. The kraal 



of a Ruanda 




ef, shown on the Ruanda- Urundi 

25c. stamp in the 1931 series, is a particularly in- 
teresting example and it is not surprising to learn 

that these huts are probably the best kept in Africa, 
uanda housewives are house proud to an exceptional 

The men are 




twang." The prey's first instinct is to stop and look 
for the source of attack, and in that moment of stillness 

the archer is able to fire off his arrow at a stationary target. 
One of the features of native life that has always puzzled Euro- 
peans is the system of sending messages through the 



forests from village to village by the beating of drums. 



So rapidly is news passed on by this means that it has 



come to be known as the "bush telegraph." The 
Belgian Congo 60c. stamp of 1931 shows two drummers, 
one of whom is carrying a drum used in sending mes- 
sages. The second drummer is carrying one of the 



famous tom-toms. The 




Somali Coast issue 



of 1915 also shows a native drummer. 

Native musicians and dancers have been a favourite 
source of inspiration for stamp designers, and Belgian 

o issues show several examples. The 40c. value 
ows two flute players, while on the 50c. stamp an 
unusual native instrument known as the ekimbe, 
is being played. The principal feature of this instru- 
ment is a length of board along which are loosely 




mounted metal strips. 





A native chief from the Belgian 

Congo. 



pi aced 



under the metal at different distances from the board 



so that 




notes are emitted when the strips are 




the finest specimens of mankind 
African continent, most of them standing over six feet 




in height. 





f armin g, h un tin g, 




fishing and 

themselves automatically 

- 




the 



chief 



natives, and 



occupations 



of 



struck. It isplayedm much the same way as the dulcimer or xylophone. 
There is not space here to detail all the many other aspects of 
native life that are revealed through the stamp album, such as types 
of personal adornment, foods, 
transport, domestic utensils and 
equipment, recreations and so 






are many 
to illustrate 

these activities. Other occu- 

■ 

pations, in'which natives often 

display considerable skill, are 
wood carving, the making of 

making 



be 





natives 



and 

Cameroons. weaving. The Belgian Congo 



on, but each of these topics can 

examined thoroughly, 
reader who cares to compile a 
collection of stamps 



Any 




n 



■ 




ative life will find the subject 
intensely fascinating, both 
himself and for those of his 
friends who are privileged to 



. 










see the collection. 



Congo village storehouses. 






686 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 






The ^ 





CATALOGUES 






o i tr 



USTtNG 




THE 



CORONATE 




m * *?&£»<%£ 



Sto 9=« ,n9 „ „l the best by ! 




■ l 



IN? 



V4 



A 



> « . . 



■—».•■ at- 






As an amateur and 



usi* 



_ 



n-i 



OJTfcUOGUE 
193 6 



■ ■" 



1:1 



oth eK ' V** * 9 swm p de 
booWseUa'" be ons 

they «• «"^ ad 



you' to^ 1 




CAtAtOGOl 



I I 



«* THE 

*ORLD 






-^f 






16 



/ 



.-• 



*•• 




/ 




Master your- 

satis 

your trains 

arrive and depart* or are they 
hat little bit late, which pius 
n necessary strain on your 
staff? 

Perhapsyou need an efficient 
Milbro loco? If so, drop a 

line to •"Billie" Mills, who 
knows all the prob 
model railway oreaniz 



cms o 




p 




onW 



\o 



/ 



him 
catalogue 



■ 



6d 



ew 



CMAUOGUt 



J - 



- '** 



■ ■ 



I*" \ 



»*~ 



0** 



PtiN 



Ml the *o*» ^^^^^& 



•"Bi/Iie" MM, oritf o/ the "Big 3" 
Man J MMro.' I las made a lifelong 
study of model railway problems, 



STANDARD TANK ELECTRIC 

LOCO 

All locomotives are painted and lined 
in the colours of the Company they 
represent, viz: L.MS. Maroon, 
L.N.B.R, Green, Q.W. G«en, S.R. 

i also be sit 



Qvcen. They can 



black. O-Jy-6. 



en, 
supplied in 



'*& 



■ 

A 



J HACK PARTS 

Rustless coated steel raits. Qauge O p 
JiJ, per 3 ft, length. Qauge I* 3d. 

per 3 ft. length. 
Chairs. Oxidised Spring Steel. Gauge 
O, lf3 per 100. Qauge U 2*3 pet 100. 
Sleepers. Qauge O, 3 in. 2\- per 100. 

1, 4in« 2110 per 100. 




TRUETOSCALE 



STANLEY GIBBONS LTD. 

DEPT. S.I 5. 391 STRAND. LONDON, W.C.2 



MILLS BROS. (Model Engineers) LTD 




F.S.), St Mary's Rd.,SHEFFIELD 






TWO PENCE ONLY 

Twenty large pictorial stamps including Jubilee* 
and Coronations free to all applicants for ap* 
provab and particulars of unique Bonus Scheme 

who enclose 2d. for postage. 

C. A. Masters* Broadstone, Dorset. 






1935 





PACKET FREE!! 



B 



The stamps in this splendid up-to-date packet have ail been issued during 

these years. Included ate 1935 MALTA Silver Jubilee 193T CANADA 

CORONATION (KG VI and Queen Ehzabeth), set of 4 I.1S i 335 ROUMANIA 
pictorial ALGERIA (1936), mint KOUANG-TCHEOU, new FR. EQUATORIAL 
AFRICA (lumber raft), SELANGOR (mosque), NEW ZEALAND (kiwi), tine new 
mint MOZAMBIQUE CO. (Ru-affe), mint MOROCCO AGENCIES IK.E.VIII), 
the new type of Br. Colonial from GRENADA (K.G.V1), etc. Free only to 
those who request approvals and send 2d. postage and packing. {Over- 
seas or without approvals, 1/-.J 

HELY. HUTCHINSON (M.2), Hurrock Wood, Kents Bank, Grange-over-Sainis. 




CORONATION 




BRITISH COLONIAL pictorial sets of GAMBIA and GRENADA new issue FREE to collectors sending 2d, stamp and 
requesting ALL BRITISH COLONIAL APPROVALS containing CORONATION, PICTORIAL and JUBILEE ISSUES. 
[No stamps sent Abroad.! C. H. SHAW (Dept, M.11), 95. CHR'STCHURCH AVENUE. KENTON, HARROW. 




JUBILEES 



SUPER BRITISH COLONIAL STAMPS, 5/- PACKETS. 

A, Woolf. 138, Blandford Road, Hamwotthy, Dorset, 






f *# 



10 Different Coronation used 

3 tt Morocco Coronation mint, 

11 lf .> K.E.V111 mint 

Postage 14d* extra. Selections if desired. 

J. R. MORRIS, 9. AUDLEY ROAD, FOLKESTONE, KENT. 



• -> 



#•# 



*#* 



7d. 
1/9 

5d. 

1/2 




WH 



This 



Very Special 



month we are making 
DOUBLE FREE GIFT offer of a packet of 110 

Different Stamps, including a large two-coloured 
MAP STAMP from St. Pierre. New SAHARA 



RUINS PACKET 

This wonderful gift con- 
tains 67 diff . superb stamps, 
including beautiful mint CYPRUS pict. (Vouni 

ruins); fine new U.S.A. large commem.; SIAM; 
scarce mint PARAGUAY; quaint PERAK (Rajah); 
LEBANON Cedar). S.AFRICA ptct.j 10 BRITISH 
COLS.: Venezuela; .^et^ Ciccho-Slov,, etc. Also 
pkt.of STAMP MOUNTS and new price list of over 
1,000 packets. All absolutely FREE to genuine 

approval applicants enclosing lid. for postage. 

G. F. PORTER. 1 73. Lea Bridge Road, Leyton, E.10 




FREE! EXHIBITION PACKET containing 50 differ- 
ent stamps, including ANTWERP 1894 rind BRUSSELS 

1896 EXHIBITIONS, ere. 250 mounts, duplicate book, 
and perforation pause. Request approvals. Enclose 2d. 
postage. No approvals sent abroad. A. R. Dickie 
(Dept. Ml. 23. Winscombe Crescent, Ealins. W.5. 



WORLD COLLECTIONS. 150 different 1/- 
500 2/6. Sullivan, 1. Dagnall Park, S.E.25. 



250 1/6, 



DESLKT P,ctoriai. Colonial 



ver JUBILEE. 



New AIR STAMP, ARMS Stamp from Monte 
Carlo, and MANY OTHER Interesting Stamps, 
with Colonial PICTORIALS and NOVELTIES. 
In addition to these 110 DIFFERENT STAMPS 
we arc giving a packet of Best Quality STAMP 

these very 



FREE. 15 British Cot, pictorials. Request low-priced 
Empire approvals. Worgan, 6. Red Lane, Apple ton, 
Cheshire. 



HINGES. To secure BOTH 
desirable FREE GIFTS just request our World 

Famous Approvals, 

Please send 2d. for Postage (Abroad 6dA 

N. MOSELEY (M.3), 



Centra I 




arket, CARDIFF. 



FREE! LEATH 





CASE 






This fine little leather case, Just the thing for 

holdinc lo " " ' 




duplicates, will be sent ABSO- 
LUTELY FREE to all genuine applicant* for my 
approval books. These contain CORONA- 
TIONS, fine mint and used BRITISH 
COLONIALS, and if desired brilliant 
FOREIGN. Enclose with your letter 2d. 

stamps; smd write now to: 

fi. KIN8SMILL. D.W.E.C.. S.T.PJL 
(Dent MM). NEW BARNEt. HERTS. 



new 



in 



^ 









BARGAIN 



PACKET 






of 1,000 stamps, all different, containing many 
rarities and fine pictorials, including large obso- 
lete ABYSSINIA, unu«cd AFGHANISTAN, ALBANIA 
pictorial, MONGOLIA pictorial, showing a group 
of Mongols learning the Latin alphabet, 
MOROCCO, K.ng George VI, only iuet issued, 
PERSIA, set of three, 1882 issue (this set alone is 
catalogued at 8/-), RHODESIA. 1897, 8d. (cat. 5/4, 
RUSSIA. 1921. "Triumph of Revolution" com- 
memorative (cat. 2/6), SIAM. 1928 issue, and 
hundreds of other wonderful stamps. Total 
catalogue value about £5- Price 8/6 post free. 

Cash with order* All stamps guaranteed genuine* 

D. GREENHALGH t 

ESKDALEMU1R. LANGHOLM, DUMFRIESSHIRE. 






THIS UNIQUE packet contains stamps bearing the heads of murdered 

Romulus^d Remu* one blled fc*^***^ l«»bb«d]. JUGOSLAVIA (mourning Mamp.1 King Alexander, 

* ^niiNA, Martyrs issue, ieng Keng and his compatriots (all were assassinated}. GREECE, Riaas Feros (killed 




PACKET 




RUSSIA (Czar], murdered in a cellar* ITALY, 

who was 

IntLnfrJI^w ^Kr t«hot in • Theattel. Send ltd. postage, ask for approval sheets and receive the packet free. 

Senders of collector, addresses receive 6 VcnezueU or 6 Persia free. 100 B. Col. 1/-; 20 Airport od.; 6 Triangular 7d. : 20 Brajil 8d. 

H. C. W ATKINS (M. Dopt.), GRANVILLE ROAD, BARNET. 



For other Stamp Advertisements see pages 684 and 





^ 
S 







t 







MECCANO MAGAZINE 



687 






annnnnDnnDnnDDannnnnnnnnnnnanDnnaDDp 



a 

3 
D 

D 

a 

a 

n 

D 

□ 

□ 

a 

D 








B 

a 
a 




□ 

□ 

□ 

n 



and Notes on 




Issues 






nnnnnnnnnnnnannnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnDa 





King George VI 



Colonial Issues 



■ ■ 

be modified, A new series will probably be 






Preparations for permanent King George 
VI issues are well advanced in most of the 
British colonies, and already a number of 
them have announced preliminary details. 

In most cases the designs will be pictorial, 

with a simple inset 

portrait of the King. 

British Honduras 




for the higher 




ues, 2id. and 







Ceylon also will retain most of the exist- 
ing designs. Apart from the substitution of 
the portrait of King George VI and slight 
alterations to the borders, the only changes 
will be in the 10c. value, which is to show 
the Sigiriva or "Lion Rock 11 ; the 20c., whi 
will take the 9c. design, showing tea 



wm 




Latvian Independence Monuments 

Readers who are interested in statuary as 
depicted on stamps will find considerable 
interest in a recently issued Latvian series, 
on which are shown monuments erected in 
different parts of the country to commemor- 
ate the achievement of independence. We 
illustrate two of them, the 3s. and 35s. 



is to issue a series of 
12 stamps as follows: 

lc„ Maya figure; 2c, 





ing; 3c, 
Cohune palm; 4c., 
local products; 5c, 

grape-f ru it; 10 
mahogany 



on 

Ser- 

boat); 

50c, chicle industry; $1, Court House, 

Belize; $2, 
of arms. 



geant's C 




*> 



3C., 




mahogany cutting; $5, coat 







British Somaliland issue also will be a 

►ictorial series with designs as follows: J, 1 , 

and 3a., vignette of a black-headed sheep, 

with a border design of spears and bucklers; 




ing; and the 2r. value, in which an ancient 

guard stone will be seen. 

Seychelles is to have an entirely new issue, 
with three pictorial designs used over 15 
values. These designs will show a coco-de- 
mer palm tree, a giant tortoise, and a fishing 
pirogue respectively. Each design will 

the King's portrait. 

Trinidad and Tobago ^will use the existing 
designs with the new King's portrait. 

Mother and Child Designs 

On occasions the minds of stamp de- 
signers run on the same lines. A striking 
instance of this is afforded in the new issue 
supplement included in the October number 




4, 6, 8 and 12a., vignette showing the head 
of a Greater Kudu antelope; rupee values, 

an outline map of Somaliland. In all values 

the name of the territory, " 




Protectorate," will be displayed at the 

and the value at the base. 








is to issue an entirely new pictorial 

series and the designs in this case will offer 
a most interesting series of views as follows: 
Jd., Grand Harbour; Jd., Fort St. Angelo; 
Id., Verdala Palace; lid., neolithic hypo- 
geum (monument); 2d., Citadel of Victoria, 



of Gibbons Stamp Mo 




in which there 






Gozo; 

Adam 




Grand 

Mdina; 




1/ Isle 

John's 

6d., 



Co-Cathedral; 4£d., Mnajc 

Grand Master Manoel De Vilhena; Is., 

Maltese girl 




the 




or 



"Faldetta" traditional headdress; 1/6, St, 
Publius; 2/-, Mdina (Notabile); 2/6, Grand 
Harbour; 5/-, Palace Square; 
10/-, St. Paul. 

Nigeria also is to issue a 
full set of pictorials, in which 
the eight lower values will 

feature types of mail trans- 



are seven designs iiuorpor- 
ating pictures of mothers with 

. The fact that five of 
issues were devoted to 
children's or nursing charities 
explains to some extent the 
similarity in design. 

We illustrate the 2K value 

fn -in Czech' ►Slovakia 's Child 
Welfare issue showing a 
lullaby scene at a 

r 

cradle. The two lower v 
in this series, 501 1. and 




show 




e mother, 




and 




ues, showing the Independence Monu- 
ment at Rauna and that at Riga respectively. 
The series contains seven stamps in all, 
the other designs being as follows: 5s., Ceme- 
tery Gate, Riga; 10s., Independence Monu- 
ment at Jelgava; 20s., War 
Memorial at Valka; 30s., In- 
dependence Monument at 
Iecava; and 40s. , Monument 
at Visagalas 

A United States Centenary 

The recent United States 
commemorative celebrating 
the 150th anniversary of the 
enactment of the North West 










Territory Ordinance is repro- 
duced here. 




as 



runner; 




2a„ Dak 

bullock cart; 

3a „ two-horse cart; 3£a,, 
camel post; 4a., mail train; 
6a., P. & O. steamer; 8a., 

mail lorry; 12a., Armstrong- 



Wnitworth "Ensign 



type 



aeroplane. The new 2/6 

value will use the existing design showing 
the Victoria-Buea road, and the 5/- value 
will have the design at present in use for the 




cradle only. The other four charity designs 
were Austria's 24g. Mother's Day com- 
memorative, Belgium's Queen Astrid Public 
Utility Fund series of eight stamps, each 
showing a portrait of the late Queen Astrid 

and the baby Prince 

Baudouin,Colombia's5c.Red 
Cross tax issue, and France's 
65c. Health Society stamp. 



W 



r- 



also 




the 



United States Virginia Dare 
commemorative, to which we 
referred in the September 
"M.M." Virginia Dare was 

born hi Kentucky in 1587, 

and was the first white child 
born in the U.S. A 




* 



10/ 



value, the River Niger at 




The first three values of the new Barbados 
series, £d. ( Id. and l$d., have alreadv been 
despatched to the Colony, and will be 
on sale shortly. 

Bermuda is retaining most of the existing 
designs, but certain of the colourings are to 



India's New Stamps 

This month we are able to reproduce the 
first of India's King George VI stamps, 
which are among the most important issues 

of the new reign. 

It will be seen that the general features of 

the new design differ materially from those 

■ H ■ ■ ■ -M ~ 4 ^ 



The design shows the two 
leaders, Cutler and Putnam, who were 
responsible for negotiating this ordinance, 
which brought the vast area then known as 
the North West Territory into the United 
States. The respective areas of the two 
territories at that time are also shown in 
the design, which makes a most interesting 

to the list of map stamps. 

Airways are Mailways 

Following the note in our August issue 
concerning the carriage of Empire mails by 
air without surcharge, several readers have 
asked us to give them a list of countries to 
which mail is now sent by air at ordinary 

postage rates. 

Certain extensions of the scheme, o 




the 



characteristic 



of previous issues, 

pointed arch of Indian architecture having 
been adopted for the framing. The orna- 
ments in the upper corners are lotus buds. 



than the Empire interest, were made in 
August and the list is now a very compre- 
hensive one for it covers 21 countries. 
These are Austria, Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, 
Danzig Free State, Denmark, Estonia, 
Finland, Germany, Greece, Holland, 



Hungary, 




Latvia, Lithuania, 



Norway, Poland, Roumania, South Russia, 
Sweden, Switzerland, and Turkey . 



We thttnk Stanley Gibbons Ltd. for their courtesy in 
loaning the stamps from which the illustrations on this 
page have been made. 












688 




MECCANO 




A Belfry on the Ground 

By Robert Light 

Most old churches have some particularly 
interesting feature, but few are more re- 




markable in this respect than the one at 

Bergholt, Suffolk, which has its belfry 
on the ground. The bells 
at this church are invert- 
ed, and are mounted on 
i hick pieces of oak. They 
are rung by swinging 

them over into a pit be- 
low, and back again by 
hand, and the belfry is 

to be the only 

one in existence in whic 

the bells are swung by 
handling their stocks. 



A Strange Pumping System 




G. R. Stocks 

On a recent visit to Germany I 

- . _ _ _ 




a 






day in Bad Munster am Stein, one of the 
oldest health resorts in Germany. The most 
remarkable feature of the town is the system 



Smashing the Atom 

Scientists in various parts of the world 
bombarding targets of various materials 
with protons and other tiny particles shot 
out from vacuum tubes at velocities that 
vary from 30 to 











This 



curiosity Was 



erected over 400 

ago. The tower 
church was com 



years 
of the 





Cardin al Wolsey 

■r 



about 1520, but at his 
downfall it was left un- 
finished* as it remains to- 

day. and a caye was built. 

in the churchward to 

house the bells. 
There are 

The treble bell 




m.p.h. The 
largest special unit for 
carrying out bombard- 
ments of this kind is 



being 



built 



by 



the 



Westinghouse Electric 
and Manufacturing Coni- 



the 



United 



pany in 
States. 

The new unit 
of an immense tank 







shaped like a pear, which 
stands with its wider 

end uppermost. The tank 
is 47 ft, 

■ ■ 



high and 



at its 



widest part has a diam- 
eter of 30 ft. Including 



the building on which it 




rests, the total height of 



the structure 



is 



65 ft 



Ladders enable the tank 

to be climbed and there 

is an 





from which 

■ ■■ 





in terior 



modern. It was i*u>c m to 

1887 and Weighs 1 2± cwt. 

The second bell, known as Gabriel, is much 

older. It was founded in the year 1450, and 

weighs 12 J cwt. The third and fourth bells 

weigh 14f and 18f cwt. respectively. The 

tenor bell is the largest, weighing 25 cwt. 



A clockwork model C.W.R. 2-6-2 or "Prairie" tank adapted from a Hornby No. 2 SpeciaJ Tank Locomotive 

by Mr. E. M. Berry, the G.W.R. Stalionmaster at Stroud. Gloucestershire. The original mechanism has been 
converted into a six-coupled one, outside cylinders have been fitted, and the footplate has been arranged 

*- "drop" at both ends. The photograph is reproduced by courtesy of Mr. C. H. Barnes of Stroud. 






can be examined. Inside 
it there will be a generator 



producing a direct elec 



of 



14 



Gradierwerke. ' ' A "Gradierwerk 



H 






If 



IS 



a huge wooden frame, about 30 ft, high and 
100 ft, long, which is built up in 



a large 



reservoir that also is made of wood. The 

closely-packed 







*SE 




#tv* 









of it 



IS 





• 



IS 







By CHARLES J. FINGER 

Lllus. 8'6 net 



- . mj 



A tale of a dog among sheep- 
farmers, first in Western A us* 



framework is filled wi 
cuttings of blackthorn, with the twigs and 
leaves pointing outward, so that the struc- 
ture resembles a gigantic hedge 
in a wooden fence, and on 
a wide trough. 

There are four of these frames in different 
parts of the town. The oldest was erected in 
1718 and the most recent in 1778, and their 
purpose is to concentrate the salts in the 
curative water from the springs. The lower 
reservoir contains the liquid, which is 



- 

pum 




to 




upper trough. From there it 




in South Africa, 

Argentine, 




: 



tralia, 

and finally in 

"The kind of book that will 

interest everybody to whom a 

rattling good tale of adventure 



trickles down over the blackthorn twigs in 
countless streams, and water is driven out 

caused by the pre- 




24 




1 



5. 



ii 





■ 

Tail Waggcra Magazine. 



m 




of it by eva 

vailing winds. 

All parts of the machinery are made of 
wood, the 

hollowed -out 

power for the system is obtained from the 
now of the River Stein, along the bank of 
which are four 20-ft. water wheels of the 
undershot type, each developing about 



consisting of 

trunks. The motive 




a voltage of five million and more, together 
with a vacuum tube 40 ft. in 

The giant vacuum tube will provide the 

shells used in this scientific bombardment, 
and these will be accelerated on their way 
down the tube by the high voltage applied 

to them. On reaching the end they will pass 

through windows consisting of thin sheets 
metal, and will strike their targets 
with such tremendous force that they will 
penetrate the hard centres or nuclei of the 
atoms of which they consist, breaking them 
up and transforming them into other 
elements. The tank in which the vacuum 
tube will be housed will be filled with air at 
a pressure of 120 lb. per sq. in. 







■ 




Hobbies 1938 

The 1938 edition of the catalogue issued each year by 
Hobbies Ltd. is as comprehensive and interesting as its 

ssors, and 




i» 



By JACK O'BRIEN 



llltis. 5 



r 



net 



This grand story of life in the 
Royal Canadian Mounted 
Police is by the author of 



W 





was a 





or 



Book Club Recommendation 
last year (now published at 3'6 
in Harrap's Green Riband 
Library). 



5 h.p. The wheels are a considerable distance 
from the frames, and the rotary motion is 

conv- 




oy cranks into a horizontal 
movement and the power is transmitted to 
the pumps by long wooden connecting-rods. 
The system works well, only an occasional 

creak betraying the whereabouts of the 
rods, which for the greater part of their 
length run under the frames or in conduits. 
The water of the springs flows out at the 
rate of nearly 400 cu. ft. an 



II 4 



ore useful than ever to the handy- 
man* In general arrangement it follows the lines of 
previous editions. As usual the main portion deals with 
fretwork, and gives descriptions and illustrations of 
fretwork apparatus and equipment of all kinds. There 
are many excellent illustrated designs for fretwork 
models, including folding tables or various kinds, 
clocks, bookcases and screens, and a complete collec- 
tion of wood-working and carving tools is listed. 



Special articles deal with a series of attractive model s t 
including a handsome clock that forms the subject of 
one of the two large free design charts available for 
purchasers of the Handbook, Others explain the con- 
struction of ship models and calendars, for which a 
Colour Picture is given with the catalogue. The 
contents include also informative articles on various 
forms of craft work* 

The catalogue can be obtained for 6d* from any 
newsagent or Hobbies dealer, or direct from Hobbies 
Ltd-, Dereham, Norfolk, for 9d. post free. 








It has a 
ure of 31 (leg. F., and a salinity 
cent. Evaporation is 



FROM ALL BOOKSELLERS 



HARRAP 



according to the wind, and the 

pumped from section to section 

frames in order to concentrate it as much as 




Billiards in the Home 

Billiards is one of the most fascinating of all games, 

and every year sees an increase in interest in tables on 





While this is 



- 



going 



on, 




Bad Munster for cures recline 

■ 










• 





facing the frames, 

laden ( air as they lie there. 




in the salt 



The solution is finally pumped to an 



evaporating plant, where the salts 
spring water are crystallised out. 




the 



which the game can be played in the home. E. J 
Ltd. were pioneers of home billiards. Their products 
include models for every home, large or small, among 
them small tables that 'can be placed on an ordinary 
dining table, and others that are combined billiards 

and dining tables, the transformation from one to the 
other being made in two minutes. These tables are not 
toys. Whatever its size, every model is a replica in 
eon struct ion of the full-size t a tiles for which the makers 
are world-famous. 

**MM" readers who are interested in home billiards 
should write for a free illustrated art list of these tables- 
This will be Sent immediately on application to E. J, 

3 



Riley Ltd., Deal Works, Accrington, or 
Aldersgate Street, London, E.C.L 




147, 



. 




THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



689 




f 





Some years ago we tried our 




patience, and 



their keenness, with a series of "Hidden Proverbs" 
competitions. They proved so popular that we are sure 






ano 




competition of the same nature this month will 



prove an interesting 
diversion, 

some luckv 



logue as the winners desire, to the value of 21/ 



15/- 




and 5/ 
of the 




be awarded to the 







in 





of 

.merit. In addition there will be a number of consolation 

prizes for the next 
best entries. In the 



an opportunity to in- 
crease their stock of 
Meccano or 
Trains. 

In the 
in the centre of this 





each 



of 



the 



squares con- 





event of a tie 



> 



the 




be award- 







entries 

■ 

neat- 
most novel 

on, but it 



page 
t hree 

■ 

tains certain groups 

letters which, 
when sorted out, will 
form the words of a 
wel 1 -kn own proverb , 

It will be noticed that each group contains six 
styles of lettering, and the only clue to the solution of 
the puzzle lies in their introduction and the manner in 
which they have been used. One word of warning should 

given. The means of solving one of the th 
will not necessarily prove the key to the 



■ 

presen 
should be remember- 
ed that accuracy of 
solution will count 
first in the judging. 

Entries should be 
addressed "Hidden 





Proverbs, Meccano 
Magazine, Binns 



reach this 




not 








Prizes of Meccano Pr 




i 




is 



of 



listed in 




any articles 



current Meccano and Hornby Train cata- 



Road, Liverpool 13," and 
later than 30th November. 

There will be an Overseas section to this competition, 
open to readers living outside Great Britain and Ireland 

Meccano pro- 



and the 




Islands 









' 




of the same values 




section will 



be awar 




Overseas entries 




arrive 





than 28th February, 1938. 



November Drawing Contest 



As announced in our last issue, we are 
holding this winter a series of drawing 



competitions that are open to readers of all 



ages. No 




subjects are set, the 



monthly prizes being offered simply for the 
best drawings or paintings submitted 



during the month. The entries may be of 
any size to suit the competitor's preference. 

The entries each month will be divided 

- 

into the usual two sections, A for readers 
aged 16 and o\ T er, B for those under 16; and 
prizes of Meccano products to the value of 



21/ 




10/6 will be 

w 




in 






section. Entries in the November com- 

- • 

petition must be addressed "November 
Drawing Contest, Meccano Magazine, Binns 
Road, Liverpool 13," and must arrive not 

30th November. There will 
sections for Overseas readers in 

which prizes of the same value- as in the 

Home sections will be awarded. Overseas 
closing date 28th February, 1938. 

Intending competitors are reminded that 

unsuccessful entries can be returned on 

if a stamped addressed cover is sent. 




i 

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Closing Dates 






HOME 

"Hidden Proverbs' * Contest 

November Drawing Contest 



30th November 
30th November 



OVERSEAS 



* "f P- 



August Photo Contest 
August Crossword Puzzle 
September Photo Contest 
"Point Words" Contest.., 
Hidden Advertisements 

Contest 
October Drawing Contest 
"Hidden Proverbs' 1 Contest 
November Drawing Contest 



30th November 
30 th 

31st December 
31st 



■• 



« 

i 
i 

! 

1 
I 





31st January, 



31sl 

28 th 
28th 



January, 

February, 

February, 



1938 
1938 
1938 
1938 



Watch the Closing Dates: 




Competitors, both Home and Overseas, 
particularly requested to make a careful note 
of the closing dates of the competitions. 

In sending, entries to competitions that are 
divided into age groups, competitors should 
take particular care to mark their ages clearly 

on the back of the entry. It is not sufficient 

merely to indicate the age group, as age allow- 
ances are given to ensure equality of opportunity 
for the younger competitors* 

Entries, other than pnzc*wmning efforts, for 
photographic, drawing and similar competitions, 
will be returned to the competitors concerned 
if a stamped addressed wrapper is sent with the 

entry, and its return requested. 



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COMPETITION RESULTS 



HOME 

"Point Words" Contest— 1. B. A. Mitchell (Liver 
pool 4). 2. L. W. Chit-tv (West Wimbledon, S.W.20 
3. F. Mills (Kearsley). 5. J. C. Barton (Colchester 

Consolation Prizes: R. Barnett (Birmingham); J- L. 
Carmel (Warrington); R. L. Chitty (West Wimbledon, 
S.W.20); J. O. Gibson (Birmingham, 15); R. Hardy- 
Man (Wotton-Under-Edge); E, A. Libgard (Lincoln); 

J. C. Smith (Bolton), 

September Photo Contest — First Prizes: Section A, 
A. Roe (Sheffield, 1); Section B, F. L. Atkins (St. 
Leonards -on -Sea). Second Pri7.es: Section A, C. M. 
Sinclair (Glasgow, S.W.2); Section B, R. J, V. 
Phillips (London, N,2l). Consolation Prizes: J. W, 
Bilunce (Brighton, 6); A, B. Bishop {Bristol, 4); 

J. C. Cain (London, S.W.lJj P. F. Chapman (St. 
Leonards-on*Sea); F. Thomson (London, S.E.I). 




OVERSEAS 

June Crossword Puzzle,— 1. E. A, Bunt (Ca 
S. Africa). 2. W. S. Eagle (Bombay), 3, R. B. Latimer 
(Rangoon, Burma). 4. R. Mybukgh (Claremont> S. 
Africa). Consolation Prize: D, I. Mitchell (Grenada, 
B.W.L). - 

June Photo Contest,— First Prizes: Section ft, J, M. 
Demanuhle (Valletta, Malta); Section B, R. Murray 
(Johannesburg, S. Africa), Second Prizes: Section A, 
S*\ Sodehberg (Falun, Sweden); Section B, R* 
Mybukgh (Claremont, S. Africa). Consolation Priae: 

E, Bourgault (Manchoukuo). 



690 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 





COME-COMEI 

A Chinese named Can-Gum was unable to go to 
work, so he asked his son to write a note to take to his 
place of employment. 

His son wrote: "Can-Gam, can't come, will come, 
when can come/* 

m * * • 

Binks: "What is it that is so brittle that you have 
only to name it to break it? ts 



Jinks: "Silence 



ii 



» 



• 



"I shall put you fellows in this room," Raid the host* 
"You 1 !! have a comfortable night, for it has a feather- 

6fc£ M 

At two o'clock in the morning one of the guests awoke. 
"Change places with me, Dick,* 1 he said, "it's 
mv turn to be on the feather/ 1 






. ! 



Customer: "I'm seeking something appropriate 
for a gift, something timely and striking-" 
Clerk: "Clock counter third on your left/ 1 



* 



* 



"Doctor, is there any danger of the operation 

r a i-k.it 

proving fatal? 

"Reallv. my good man. considering that we are 
experimenting on yon free or charge, your mie 

curiosity is hardlv good form/ 1 

# * * * 

Bob: "What's the big idea? Last week you told 

me your father was in the lumber business. To-day 
you say he manufactures shoes. What is it?" >f 

Bill: "Both, He makes wooden shoes in Holland. ' 

• * * • 

Bill: "Is Sam working yet?" 

: "Yes." 
Bill: "Has he been working long?" 
jack: "About three weeks." 
Bill: "What's he doing." 
Jack: "Six months." 

* * f m 

Policeman: "Why the speed? Are you late for 

an accident or in a hurry to see the j udge*" 

* * * » 

"The dentist wasn't painless, mummy," said 
the little girl. 

'•Why, dear, did he hurt you?" asked her mother. 
"No, But he yelled when 1 bit his finger." 




• 



* 



* 



Diner: "I want some chicken, and the younger 
it is the better/* 

Waiter: "How about an egg T sir?" 

# * • • 

NO CRUELTY TO ANIMALS 



labourer's Wife (to village chemist): "You'll 

be 

the 

nothin* to happen to the 'orse/ 1 



%%\& to write plain on the bottles which is for 
e 'otvt' and which for me 'usband. I doift want 



Manager (paying salary in very dirty notes): "I 
hope you are not afraid of microbes, Jones/ 1 

Jones: "Oh. no, sir* I'm sure no microbes could 
live on my salary." 

* 9 • • 

"I say," said the English tourist, "you have a 
great many hills in this country of yours, Pat/* 

"Shure, of course," returned Pat, "there was so 
much land that wc had to put it in heaps* 



■» 



• 



* 



• 



Professor: "Didn't I get my last haircut in this shop?" 
Barber: " I think not, sir; weVe only been tn business 
just over two years/ 1 



* 



* 



Of 



At a Christmas party the little son of the house 
had iust played his piece and his mother was beamin 

"Don't you think my son has talent?" she said to 
one of her visitors, "If you have a special wish, just 
name it, Georgie can do just what he likes with the 

piano/* 

"Er — could he shut it? asked the visitor. 

* « « * 

"Didn't you tell me you'd rubbed down hundreds 
of horses?" growled the proprietor of the stables. 

"So I have, guv'nor/' said the temporary groom, 
"only we used to nib 'em dahn wiv sandpaper 
'fore they were painted." 



WELL, I NEPHYRI 

A cow named the Burlington Zephyr, 
Was a speedy and reckless young hephyr; 
When her owner drew near, 
She kicked on his ear, 

And now the poor farmer's much dephyr." 

{"Tht Railway Gazette.") 
* * • # 



Basham: "If I had all the medals I won at boxing 
when I was a younger man, I could start a jeweller's 



1 




Misitt: "Ah, yes, and if I had all the ducks I got at 
cricket when I was a younger man I'd be owning 



yo 

the biggest poultry farm in the country/ 1 

* * • * 

RECORDS 




"Don't touch! Bertram, you mignt break something!" 

(Lourtey of the "L.M.S. Magazine.") 

Boy (to shopkeeper): "My mother says if 

didn't make your holes in your muffins' so 
they would be bigger," 

Shopkeeper: "Ah, an' if your mother paid fur all 
muffins she'd had, her bill would be a lot less/ 1 



you 

large. 



• 



* 



Wigg: "Sand wit h men seem to get very poor wages/ 1 
Wzgg: "Yes, but thev do get their boar 1 thrown in." 



• 



A fellow has to be a conmrtfonist to get on these 
days. First he has to keep bit Dark to the wall and his 
ear to the ground. Then he must put his shoulder to 
the wheel, his nose to the uriiuUtone, keep a level 
head and have both feet on the ground! 




Master: "Well Smith, what is a tissue?' 1 

; "A sneeze, sir," 

i 

* * * * 

THIS MONTHS HOWLER 

Sheep is mutton covered with wool. 



NATURALLY 





it 



omer (angrily) i "Those apples you sold me 

ay had a fishy taste 

Grocer: "Quite right. They were crab apples/* 

• * * * 

Diner: "Rastus, I ordered chicken soup. What's 



this you've brought me?" 

Rastus: "Why. suh f dat's chicken .soup." 
Diner; "It may be *****iri*«i *#««%• k«* 

chicken in it/ 1 




soup; but there's no 



Rastus: "No, suh; but dey is no dog in dog biscuits 




judge: "Do you challenge any of the jury?" 
^Defendant: "Well* 1 think I can lick that little guv 

on the end." 

* + # * 

He: "I hope mv visits are not disagreeable to voul" 
She (politely): "Not at all-" 
He: "I have sometimes thought that I worried 
you!" 

She: "Oh, no! No matter how gloomy I feel when 

you call I am always happy when you go!" 

« i * * 

Sandy entered a shop where he had recently 

purchased a bi cycle. 

It's about the bike/ 1 he said, 

"Hasn't it arrived vet?" asked the shopman. 

It has t said Sandy* "But where's that free 

wheel you spoke about?" 

♦ * * + 



a 



14 



i 



"Any empty soda or ginger- ale bottles to sell? 11 
enquired the man at the back door* 

"Do I look as though I drank that stuff?" asked 
the housewife, annoyed. 

"Well, then/ 1 continued the man t "any vinegar 



bottles?" 



• 



* 



Jack: "Oh f I'm sorry, I forgot to ask you to my 
picnic party to-morrow," 

Jim: "Too late now, I prayed for a blizzard." 




■i 







a 



ve you ever dona anvone 
good turn in your life?" 

Prisoner: "Yes, your Worship, I've kept four 
detectives in regular employment for 10 







*» 



9 

Aiuateur Gardener: "I don*t seem to be able 
to tell my garden plants from weeds. How do 
you distinguish them?" 

Old Farmer: "The only sure way is to pull 'em 

out* If ihev come up again, they're weeds, 

• ♦ + ** 

GOOD FOR BUSINESS 

"Yes/' said the stranger, "this hiking is a fine 
idea. Nothing pleases me better than to see crowds 
of people on the roads these days/ 1 

"Do you hike yourself?" 

Oh, no, I'm a manufacturer of com plasters!" 

* * # • 

Customer: " I warn you, I sha'n't be able to pay for 
this suit for three months;" 

Tailor: "Oh, that's all right, sir. Don't worry." 



»L 



"thanks. When will it be ready? 
"In three months sir," 



** 



# 



• 



Mr. Brown (who has fallen): "Don't cry Teddy, 
I'm not hurt/ 1 
Teddy; "No, but my banana is; you're sitting on it/ 



♦ 



• 



ii 



"Nature," said the philosopher, "always makes 
compensations, if one eye loses its sight the other 
becomes stronger* If one car loses its hearing, ttu- 

other becomes more acute/* 

"I believe you're right," said an Irishman, "Pvo 
always noticed that when a man has one short leg, 

the other is longer/ 1 

♦ * * * 

-J Martha, did you wash the fish before you baked it?" 
"Lor 1 , mum, no! Wot's the use of wash in* a fish 

wot's lived all f is life in urate r?" 

• • * • 

Father: "Why were you kept in at school?" 
Mike: "I didn't know where the Azores were/ 1 

Father: "In future, just remember where you 

put things/ 1 




* 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



691 




Retail Prices 



are 



e makers of "Mersey Model" Steam Engines. British 



Model 51 



52 G 
52R 



12/6 

16/6 
19/6 
21/6 



rom British materials, 

efore it leaves our Work 

• ■ 



52GR 24/6 

25/6 



models are 



fitted 



economy of steam and to gtv 



engine 
a guarantee car 

our special pac 

r power 



tested 






attach 
pistons 



pressure 



ensure 



onger running. 






53R 

53GR 



28/6 
31/6 






ree 



models 



single cylinder models run at over 1,000 r.p.m., and the twin 

over 2,000 r.p.m. 
model, 

ave remarkable powe 



instructions are inclu 



_ _ 



amp 



54R 

54 D 



37/6 
42/6 
47/6 



filling 
size. 



unne 



els 



can 



d B 






Mersey 
Meccano models, or fit extra gearing ma 



from 



parts (securing 



55R 



screws 
is o 



woo 



base), 

41 " 



same stan 



into your 

eccano 
the gear 

Meccano. 






■ 



Models 

Circular Saw 

Grindstone 












4 



- i 



Illustration shows 

model 52GR, 

Retail price 24 / 6 

complete. 



. 



BEWARE! 

Beware of imitations 
carries ~ 



our 



mode 




Model 



ate 



enuine 



without which none 

Sole Manufacturers; 

RSEY MODEL CO 

Cooper's Buildings, Church St., LIVERPOOL, I 




LTD 



Models 52 and 53 are supplied in four styles: (!) single speed, 
non-reversing; (2) single speed, with reversing valvo and speed control; 
(3) two speeds With reduction gear, non-reversing; |4) two speeds with 
reduction gear, reversing valve and speed control* Model 54 is su 
>n three styles: (1) non-reversing; (2) with reversing valve and speed 
com rot; 13) with dynamo. Model 55 is supplied; (1] non-reversing or 
(2) with reversing valve and speed control. 

We also list Speed Boat power plants, 

ete with boiler stand, lamp, 
three-bladed propeller, driving shaft, stern 

tube, universal coupling and bracket fitting. 



No, 1, Single Cylinder, 

Vertical Twin, price 2 0/ 6 
Mersey Models may 



e 15'6. 



from 



the large 



toyshops. You 

your Meccano dealer. Send 



obtained 

and leading 
them from 

our new 



193 7 catalogue and name ov nearest dealer. 





* 



B>~-^ 



PERCIVAL GULL 



Wing 18 in. Splendid 
of this famous light 

build with Comet's 
fuselage. Complete 
everything needed, 
shaped Hying 
prop, quick- 
drying cement, 
etc- Carriage 



Flying model 

to 

Auto*line*up 
kit includes 

balsa, tissue. 



If you are over 13 you can build 
these marvellous models* Send 
three Id stamps for 24 page cata- 
logue showing biggest range of 
scale flyers in England. (All kits 

2/- extra abroad.) 






l 



DX2I 



HESTGN PHOENIX 

Wing 18 in. Detailed model, excellent 
er ( retretttble landing goar. Large 
clear plan Comet Auto-line-up fuse* 
lage. Kit is absolute- g± m 

\y complete with all J[ f 

parts needed. 
Carnage paid 



■ • i ■ 



* > 






^ 



i 



PUSS MOTH 

Wing 16 in. Ideal beginner's kit— simple 
ro bund, exact replica of Molhnson s 
"Heart's Content/' and fine 

r. Kit has everything ^^ m 
needed, quick-drying *J / 
cement, flying prop, etc., 
post free 



sw 






LTD 



BANK HEY STRE 

BLACKPOOL 




FROM ALL 6000 DEALERS AND EXIDE SERVICE STATIONS 



JUST BEHIND THE TOWER 







THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 




SPEED BOATS 
2/11 to £8-8-0 



BILLIARD TABLES 
151- to £3-10-0 



It must be a boon to parents, as well as boys, to find a 




s 




GALLEON 

KITS 
12,6 to £5-5-0 




as Lucas's that caters so admirably for Hobbies and Models. 
Illustrated here are only a few typical examples taken from 



their huge stock, which includes LOCOMOTIVES, STEAM 



ENGINES, AEROPLANE SETS, 



FRETWORK 



SETS, 



CHEMISTRY 



SETS, 






CONJURING 




MODEL 



THEATRES, SEARCHLIGHT SETS, and a host of other 
Gifts that will gladden the eye of the modern boy. 

remember, for your own comfort and to 
avoid disappointment-SHOP EARLY FOR XM AS 

THIS YEAR. 




% 



j 




PATHE "ACE 



ft 



I .K. 



37f6 




KAY 
ELECTRICAL 

OUTFITS 

A presentation sei which 
oFHcsms endless amusement* 

from 3 6 to £2-10 0. 






LOCOMOTIVES 
2 9 to £5-5-0 



TABLE TELEPHONES 

A real working model beautifully 
finished in Bakelite. 25/* 




i 





OUT! 

with 66 full-page 




rawings 



and 




colour 



plates 







By H. COBLE and A. R. PAYNE 



6s. n6t 



This is a fascinating book, well planned 



and comprehensive. It contains 66 full 





page line drawings of famousaircraftan 
four illustrations in colour. There is a 

• - • • 






* 



description of every machine illustrated 
giving all details of construction as well 



as an accountof the particular flight which 



mad 





e aeroplane famous. A 




oo 





r 



the air-minded whether young or o 




W. & R. CHAMBERS LTD., 38, SOHO SQ 



■r 



W.I 





own engine 

Only a few hand tools required. 



CompI 




Stuart No. 10. 

machined set with full 
Instructions: 





1 8/6 








All our sets from 5/- upwards, illustrated and 
described in our No. 2 catalogue, 6d. post free. 

72 pages fully illustrated. 



STUART 




LTD 



Henley-on-Thames 





MODELS 



THE MOST REALISTIC AND COMPLETE SERIES OF NAUTICAL MODELS 






Scale 100 ft. 



1 in. 




ete cast 



ers, 




ouses, 




Pleasure Steamers, Tugs, Cargo Boats, OH Tank- 

nes, Destroyers, Light Cruisers, etc. 

SHIPSERIES DISPLAY SETS 




> 






Seven scale models "SHIPS OFTHE ROYALNAVY" complete, price 2/6. 
Also "SHIPS OF THE MERCHANT NAVY," six scale models, complete, 

price 2/6. 
Realistic Coast Line, in sections 15£ ins, long, 1 /6. 



„ „ „ with Promontory and Lighthouse, 2/-. 

Constructive Sets: "Hood," "Nelson/' "Aircraft Carriers/' etc., also 

"Queen Mary," "Empress of Britain," "Aquitania," etc. 

Docks, Cranes and many other accessoriet—wr ire for complete price list: 

A. J. HOLLAIAY & CO. LTD. (Desk B) bJSSr&Sr fl,eMfi 





< 




MECCANO 




* I 



XV11 



r 



> 







* 







t I . 




THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



* 

















poOTBALL BY THE FBRESI 

FOOTBALLO. Here's a grand pastime, Boys, to 
brighten up the long winter evenings. Footballo is 
easily followed, for on face of the "playing pitch'* are full 
instructions. Dice Box, Counters, and Dice are provided. 
The game opens on the throw of the Dice, and includes 
Throw-ins, Corners, Goal Kicks, and Penalties. Footballo 
can "bejjfayed from an easy chair, for though the weather 
may be vile outside, the game still goes on, literally by 
your own fireside. Footballo is ideal for an evening's 
enjoyment, and great fun too. Make sure you get one 
yourself this Xmas. 



MANUFACTURED IN GREAT BRITAIN 






11 





Super 



w 



de-Lu 



xe 



it 




et 




! 



D 




e 



76 



Stand 



ar 






/ 




(Postag 



e 



6d.) 



Stan 




ar 




Mo 




e 



Price £1 .1 .0 (Carnage 



V 




Junior Mode 




Price 10' 




(Carriage 9dJ 




w 




MBLEY" MINIATURE FOOTBALL 



Another grand game that will give you the thrill and 
excitement of open-air football. The players actually play 
with the ball, run, swerve, pass, and kick for goal. Here 

■ 

again weather conditions count for nothing, for this is an 



indoor game, exciting, skilful, and packed with fun. 
There are two teams of coloured metal men, each under 

your own control. The models, beautifully coloured 
bright green and orange, are complete with full instruc- 
ttons. If you want to be the "Centre" of attraction this 
Xmas, don't fail to put "Wembley" Miniature 
Football on your list. 



MANUFACTURED IN GREAT BRITAIN 



Obt 



ama 





at 







nq 



* 



IN 



CASE 



OF 



DIFFICULTY 



WRITE 



TO 














!• 



■ 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



XLX 





► 



I 











popular than ever. An illus- 

Instructions 
included with each Bayko Set. Here 

is the list of models that can be built: 



CON 





No. 3 



No. 






No. 6 



Set build 



Set 








HT 




Set 

Set 
Set 
Set 



ft 



tt 



tt 



tt 



over 



CTIONAL 



SETS 



36 

60 

120 
300 

600 
700 



Mo 




els 



tt 



tt 



tt 



ft 



Price 



ft 



rt 



tt 



tt 



ft 



tt 



7/6 

10/6 

15/- 

21/- 

30/- 
42/- 



These amazingly ingenious Con- 
structional Sets are now famous. 






The range of models that can be 
built is astounding, for they 
include Castles, Garages, Houses, 
Railway Stations, and a host of 
other models. (The Double Storey 

House and Garage illustrated is 

built from a No. 5 Set.) The 

are beautifully coloured, 

m 

realistic, and to scale, yet light and 
easy to handle. Commencing with 
the lowest priced Set at 7/6, you 
can, 






means of Converting 
Sets, work up to the larger sizes. 
"Build better with Bayko** 

is a by-word among the thousands 
of boys who are already Bayko 

enthusiasts, for the Bayko 
of building has to be experienced 
to be appreciated. You, too, 
must become a Bayko builder. 





* 



I 



/ 



Stores 





Manufactured in Great Britain 



Made throughout in Coloured Bakelite 



Dealers 













■ 
■ 

■ 


J 

■ Ad 








SOUTH HUNTER 





LIVERPOOL 



r 







.. i 



i *K I 






m > 



i* 









■# 








MECCANO MAGAZINE 



DOLL 







WONDERFUL SERIES OF ACTUAL SCALE MODELS 




DINING-ROOM FURNITURE 

Dinky Toys No, 101 Price of complete set 2/3 

No, 101a, Table , Sd.each 




The jolly Doll's House Furniture that 



a s 



forms 
of Dinky 





has 



nsion of the range 

wonderful 




popularity. Every piece is a perfect 
miniature scale model based on a typical 
example of modern design, and with a 
beauty of finish that must be seen to be 
appreciated. All are made to a scale of 






BEDROOM FURNITURE 



No, 101b* Sideboard (Opening doors) 
No* 101c Carver Chairs 
No. 101d. Chairs 



■ ■ ■ 



**# 



■ - * 



9d. 
3d. 
2d. 



Dinky Toys No. 102 

No. 102a. Bed ... 



Supplied in walnut brown finish only. 







No. 102 b. 
No. 102c. 

No, 102d. 



No. 102e. 



Price of complete sec 2/11 

od.each 
9d. 



9 # ft 



-*> 



Wardrobe (Opening door) 
Dressing Table (Opening drawers) 
Dressing Chest (Opening drawer) 
Dressing Table Stool 

Chair 



»* * 



10d. 
6d. 
2d. 
2d. 



No. 1 02f. 

Supplied in colour or walnut brown finish. 



i. 

It 



KITCHEN 

Dinky Toys No, 103 Price of complete set 2/6 




7/1 6th of an inch to one foot, which is as 
nearly as possible 1/27th full size. The 
different items of the four complete 
suites— dining-room, bedroom, bath- 
room and kitchen — are fascinating to 
handle, and there is a real thrill in 
manipulating the tiny opening doors 

and drawers. 

Each of the suites can be bought either 
as a complete set or in separate items. It 
is thus possible to increase the size of any 
one set by adding more chairs or other 
items as required. 



No, 103a. 
No. 103b. 




No. 103c, 

No. 103d. 
No. 1 03e. 



H 



Refrigerator (Opening Door) Bd.each 
Kitchen Cabinet (Opening 

doors and drawer) 
Electric Cooker (Opening 

door) »** *,# »»» 6d* 

Table ... ... ... 4d. „ 

Chair ... ..* ••• 2d- n 

Supplied In two colour schemes — light blue and 

white; light green and cream. 



BATHROOM FURNITURE 



Dinky Toys No. 104 



No. 104a. 
No. 1 04c. 



Bath 6d. each 
Pedestal Hand Basin 



« 



No. 1 04d . 
No. 104e. 



* + ii 



* *# 



Stool 

Linen Basket (Opening lid) 

Toilet (Lifting lid) 
Supplied In two colour schemes — pink and 

white; light green and white. 



No 1041. 



Price of com plete set 2/- 

No. 104b. Bath Mat 1d. each 

6d. 

2d. 

... 4d. each 

6d* each 



* *» 



n 



n 




L L Y V AR D 
DOLL'S HOU 

FOR DINKY TOYS FURNITURE 




THE IDEAL GIFT 
FOR GIRLS 




This back view of the 
DolVs House shows the 
four suites of Dinky 

Joys Doll's House 
Furn ilure tastefully 
arranged in position* 





following 



dimensions 



are 



The "Dolly Varden" Doll's 

House provides a perfect setting 
for the Dinky Toys Doll's 
House furniture* 

The exterior of 
house is designed to repre- 
sent a half-timbered dwell- 
ing, while the interior 
decorations, which are 
printed in nine colours, 

are In an attrac- 
tive modern style* 

Rein forced 
leather board is 

the material of which 



House when built u 
Length, 1 ft. 6} in. 



10i in. Height, 



■ 

house 



open 
stands 



2 ft. 5i in. 



When 



house 



in container, the overall 
sionsof the complete parcel are J in 
7}in.x2'fc5iife 




only 



Price of * -Dolly Varden 1 ' 





the overall 
Dolly Varden 



6| in. 



container on which 
measures 3 ft. 



disman 



is constructed , and 

collapsible it is as strong as a wood 

structure when set up* The container, 
which also is made of reinforced leather 

opens out to show a lovely garden 
with Tennis Lawn. Carriage Drive, and 
Rockery, providing an exquisite setting for play 
with Dinky Toys and Hornby Trees, Hedging, etc. 
The arrangement of the Dinky Toys Furniture, 
shown tn the illustration on the right is intended 

as a suggestion. Great fun is to be had from 
re-arranging the various items, perhaps on the lines 
of some familiar real rooms* 

i.n-ii.- w—j — ■* Doll's H 




The Couch Hammock, 1 ennis 
Net* Garden Scats, Dinky Toys 
Garage, Motor Cars and Figures, 
and the Hornby Trees and 
Hedging featured' in the illus- 
tration on the left are not included 

with the DolV 
Garden 



Dolt's House 




ouse 



LTD. 



BINNS 



ROAD 



LIVERPOOL 



13 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



XXI 



. 





I 



* 






No. REFRIGERATOR VAN 

Lettered LM.S . G.W., N.E. and 
SR. Finished in white with the 
appropriate details. Price 1/6 



#» 



B" 



♦OPEN WAGON 

Filled with centre tarpaulin 
supporting rail. Price 2/- 





No. 1 WAGON 

Price 1/6 



•HOPPER WAGON 

Mechanically unloaded 

Price 2/9 







LM.S. 









2 CORRIDOR COACH 

o$ita. Not suitable for I ft. radius 

Price 7/6 



rails 




No. 2 CORRIDOR COACH 

L.N.E.R. Brake-composite. Not suitable (or I ft. radius raits 

Price 7/6 




No, 2 CORRIDOR COACH 

G.W. Brake-corn posife. Not suitable for 1 ft. radius rails. 

Price 7/6 




No. 2 CORRIDOR COACH 

5.FL Brake-composite. Nor suitable for 1 ft. radius rails 

Price 7/6 



The Hornby Series 



Thefe 




splendid range of realistic Rolling Stock. Each item is 



An attractive selection 
for a corn pi el e price li 





Wagons, Lumber 



h f types, all utfcsuiuuiiy- imibneo, 

of Hornby Rolllnfl Stock is illustrated and described on this page. As* your dealer 




No. 

BANANA 

Letfered LM.S. 

Price 1/6 




only 



No. 1 BANANA 
VAN "FYFFES" 

Sliding doors. 
Price 2/3 




FIBRE WAGON 

This is an interesting model 
of a typa of wagon used in 
France and other European 
countries, Price 1 J 3 



REFRIGERATOR VAN 

No. 1 

Finished in white. With sliding 

doors. Price 2/3 





No. 1 
Fitted 



LUMBER WAGON 

with bolsters and 



stanchions for log transport 

Price 1/3 



SNOW PLOUGH 

With revolving plough- 
Price 3/6 








GAS CYLINDER WAGON 

Finished In red, lettered 
gofd. Price 1 /6 






CEMENT WAGON 

The door at the top opens. 
Finished in yellow. Lettered 
"Blue Circle" Portland 
Cement, Price 1/11 







TROLLEY WAGON 
Not suitable for 1 ft. radius rails. 



Pr 



i 



3/9 



TROLLETf WAGON 

Fitted with two Cable Drums. 



Price 4/3 




OIL TANK WAGON 
"MOBILQIL" 

Finished in battleship grey 

Price 1/11 




No. 1 PETROL TANK 

WAGON. "SHELL-B.P." 

Price 1/11 





No. MILK TRAFFIC VAN 

An attractive model. Avail- 
able lettered G.W. 

■ 

Price 1/6 




CHOCOLATE VAN 

"CADBURV'S" 
Th's van is beautifully enam- 
elled in blue with white roof. 

Price 2/3 



Lettered LM.S,, N.E., Q.W. or S.R. 









No. 2 HIGH CAPACITY WAGON 

Finished in correct colours of GW. and LM.S. *'Loco 
Coal" Wagons, or L.N.E.R. "Brick" Wagon. Not suitable 
for T ft. radius rails. Price 3/9 







No. 1 TIMBER 

WAGON 

Beautifully enam- 
elled in yellow and 
red. Price 1/3 




No. 1 SIDE TIPPING WAGON 

Excellent design and finish. 

Uttered "Robert Hudson Ltd." 

Price 1/9 








No. FISH VAN 

Lettered LM.S., G.W. and 
N.E Price 1/6 



No. ROTARY TIPPING 

WAGON 

iner revolves and 

Price 1/6 




lips. 



. 




LM.S. 



No. 2 

First-third. 



CORRIDOR COACH 

Not suitable for 1 ft. radius 
Price 7/6 



rails. 




No. 2 CORRIDOR COACH 

L.N.E.R. First-third. Not suitable for 1 ft. radius rails 

Price 7/6 




No. 2 CORRIDOR COACH 

G.W. First-third. Not suitable for ! fi. radius rails. 

Price 7/6 




\ 



S.R. 



No. 2 CORRIDOR COACH 

Third-class. Not suitable for 1 ft. radius 

Price 7/6 



rails, 













A 




INN 






/ 















* * 



XXLi 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 






/ 




e great 



scientist, wrote: 



*i 



I am glad to say that I 




your Seccotine 




useful 






for many ordinary 




and for scientific models. 1 



t 





writes: 






• TH 



WESTLAND LYSANDER 



Constructional Kit complete with blue 



print, price 



4 **. 



*■ # 



■ * • 



* * ft 



* ■ * 



I 



Completed Model, price 

SKYBIRD Modelling, assi 
LEAGUE, 



• * ■ 



SKYB 



become a National Hobby 






SKYBIRD Aeronautical MODELS and Accessories are 
ALL BRITISH productions. 

The first ^nd scale series of Aeronautical Models, 
introduced in 1932 and STILL the most popular to-day, 

Writ* for illustrated leaflet, the story of the SKY BIRD LEAGUE 



and latest list of production. 



SKYBIRDS 



(Desk 



London, E.C.2. 



Aldermanbury Avenue, 



(f 



M;y dear boy, 



am pleased to 






that your reports for 
term are good. During the holidays why not devote your 



V 



spare time 



m 



odd 



m 



aking 




n 




''f you 




o 




take 



my advice and use Seccotine such as Lord Kelvin used 
as long ago as 1896. There is nothing so permanently 




as Seccotine for 




ing or mending articles o 




HOLIDAYS 



all surfaces 



* 



Yours ever, Dad 



over 



P.S. Seccotine is so 




ever 




in pin-stopper tubes 
complete with directions for use, 4hd. f 6d. and 9d." 



y 



again 



! 






> * 



■. I 



. • » 



>: 



trK-K- 



r i i 



v.v« r 



V-"# 



■:--«■ 



*_■, 



. ■ j . 






■ 



;"_H 



. < 



■_■_!■_ 



:■>> 



/v 



P_B 



» 



m I 



■V 



1.JI 



■w> 



• 




POST THIS COUPON 



Dept. 



f M'CAW, STEVENSON & ORR LTD., BELFAST 

I should like to have, post free, 



copies of your Free Booklets Name 



* * * * 



■ . 



« * • # 



»*«**« »«**** 



which describe the many uses 
for Seccotine, 



Address . 



EPIIC 



MAJOR 



*? 



AKE a cinema show of yo 
holiday snaps by projectir 
themasbrilliantpictures,size36i 
x 27 in., by means of the Mill 
Episcope "Major," the wonderf 
2001220 machine which reproduces on 

2301250 screen distortionlessenlaraemer 



age 



i 



of any opaque objects such as 
photoprints, coloured pictures, 
cigarette cards, microscope slides, 
sketches, etc., without anyspecial 

preparation. 

Send for leaflet, post free on request. 

"MINOR" model for eiBarettecards,etc„4'6 
"JUNIOR" model for snaps, etc., 12'6 



• »**■■«»«■*■•■••***« »»*« 



Get this fascinating home enter- 
tainer from leading stores, or from 

MILLS BROTHERS 

{Model Engineers) LTD. Dept. FS. 
ST. MARY'S ROAD, SHEFFIELD 




r 




THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



XXlll 






> 





1 1 



r 



The best hobbies start from Northampton 



MODEL RAILWAYS— MODEL ENGINES— MODEL SHIPS 



toge 





most 





man or boy could ever 



We l, cover" ever/ mode! Problem from "A" to 



Take Model 



ays. 



MODEL ENGINEERING! 

ere is a more varied selection 



in size 







ever Detore 



summer 







ring out smart productions 



Throughout October their new Railway Catalogue has 

November 3rd. NEW A.I 7 
NEW MODEL! 



een 



Bassett-Lowke experts working overtime on new ideas 

/V v. «. Christmas time, 
preparation, and it comes fresh from the pr 



POST FREE. WRITE NOW FOR 

STEAM AND SUPER STEAM 



SOUTHERN 



tiB 



».** 









it 



.■.■«■ 









•■ 



l « 



i 



— ■ i 









-i 






• 



¥ ■ 



.-.■ 









e new BASStTT-tOWKE Tank for this season, 0-6-0 in three finishes: S.H 
LM.S-, and L.NE.fc. Fine value. Cfockwork 37'6, Electric d,e, 42'- 
d.c. spur drive 5 2' 6, a,c. 46'-. Gauge 'O." 



TIP TOP VALUE! 



For those who love the thrill oj Steam. "ENTERPRISE" is the most popular 
gauge "O" steam tocomoiive for working and hauling capacity of any 

commercial production. STEAM 50'-. 

Also ready before Christmas, the Super "ENTERPRISE," 77'6. 

THE SMART 



I 



.-I 



PV* 



■ * 



* 






«»• • 



i 



Fresh from the factory, ready to run on some smart mode! 

-O" in IMS. 



layout. Fine 
or L.N.E.R. 



value 0-6-0 Goods Locomotive, Gauge 

colours. Clockwork 28'6, Electric d.c 35'-, d.c. spur drive 42'-, 

a.c 39'-, 

Passenger Rolling Stock 



V.". 









■. ■- ' 



: 



i 



.■-■ 






.*.■. 



'.■■■ 



\* 



••• 



-■-■ . 



.■-■ 



■ 



■. ■. 






.■■■■■ 






■ ■ 

An inexpensive locomotive capable of traversing sharp curves, and 
<r "flood looker." Clockwork 42'-, Electric d.c, 42'-, d.c. spur drive 
or a.c. 58'6. Gauge "O." 

Tinplate Goods Rolling Stock 



■■V 



tt. 



r i- .- 



J 



.-^ 



MW 



IJ 



I 



ii 



.■>■ .i 






V.." 



&: 



I p 



- .- ." 



.".■ 



bmarr coacnes, 1st 
G.W.H,L.N.E>R.,or 

With special B.L 






The TWIN TRAIN 
Table Railway 

The Greatest Little Train in the 

goes from strength to 

new 



Woi!d J 




prices fort his season,— _^ - «_ 

so you must set | •■.! # 

the latest Folder. 

Send for bo!hT.T.»7 fOO" gauge) 
and F.B.17 CO" gauge) and then 
you will b© righf "up-to-date" 

with Modef Railways 



Corridor and Corridor Brake Third, in S,R.. 

Length overall 13 in. Gauge "O." 14'6 each. 

No. 612 and Cast Iron wheels, 5'- extra. 



> A 




Open wagons* all companies, now offered at 2'6« Covered Wagons 
3'», No change in flhe smartness and value of these gauge m O" vehicles 
Every type catalogued in AJ7, Get your copy! 




ORTHAMPTON'S ENGINES 

Shipyard is hard at work on For the man^who makes his own 

Ship Model Christmas presents. 
Latest idea h their 12 '6 set of 



parts for building smart watertme 
models like the "CUTTY SARK" or 

the "QUEEN MARY." Send for 
Waterline Booklet* No. 17, 



models, B.17 is a ve*y necessary 
book to have. Castings, Parts, 
Drawings, Fittings, Nuts f Bolts, etc, 
are catalogued in full, as well as 
finished models, sets of pans 



and plants. 



S.17 

of Ship 
6d. post 





describes 

BASSETT-LOWKE range 
Models and fittings. 

free. Get your copy. 





A 






LONDON: 



112, High Holbom,W.Cl 



B*| 7 contains a dozen pages 
■ 1 ' of useful up-to-date 
drawings and covets ©very want of 
The Model Engineer. 6d. post free. 

Northampton 

MANCHESTER: 

28, Corporation Street 







TO REMIND 



* ft* 



*■* 



»■* 



Here are all the BASSETT-LOWKE publications 

mentioned on this 

New A.I 7 Model Railway Catalogue 
Latest S.17 Model Ship Catalogue 
Latest B.17 Model Engine Catalogue 
T.T.I 7 Twin Train 

F.B. 17 *'0" gauge Railway Booklet 



od. 

6d. 






Ill 



■ i 



6d. 



erlin 



e Booklet No. 17 






application 






ALSO AVAILABLE: 






No* 17 Laying Permanent Way •*. 
No. 17 How to build a Traction Engine 



■ . • 



2d. 
3d. 



Why not cut out this coupon (putting a M X" agaxmt those you 

would like) and sand to BASSETT-LOWKE. 



XXIV 




M ECC ANO 














the 



There ts a splendid range of Railway Accessories in the Hornby Series, each 
one built In perfect proportion and beautifully finished. With these realistic 
accessories the most elaborate model railway may be constructed and operated 
in exactly the same manner as a real railway, 

A selection of Hornby Accessories is shown on this page. Ask your dealer to show you 
range- 





No. 2 STATION 

Built up with three detachable sections. Named "Margate," •"Wembley," "Ripon,"or "Reading." Length 2 ft. 9 in 
breadth 6 in., height 7 In. ... ... . Price 8/ 



■ 



No, 2E STATION 

rwise It is the *ame as Ne»_ 2 Station, Illustrated above. Price 9/3 









No. 4 STATION 

Similar to No. 2 Station for dimensions and style but of an improved design, more strikingly coloured, and with accessible 
Booking Hall and Ticket Office Barrier ... " 





#* * 



. • . 



■ • . 



T * -. 



■www 



• * * 



* t 4 



■ ■ - 



This Station is fitted for electrrc 



No. 4E STATION 




rw 



* m, m 



Price 10/3 



} 





No. 2 siGNAL 
DOUBLE ARM 

"Home" and 

"Distant." 
Pnce 2/3 



MO. I 

WATER TANK 

Height 7 In. 
Fitted with flexible 
tube and valve fever. 

Pri 




GRAPHITE 
GREASE 

For Springs. 

Price 
per tube 6d, 



No. 2 
JUNCTION 

SIGNAL 
♦'Home' ' or 

"Distant."Signal 
arms operated 
by levers at base. 
A very realistic 
model. Price 4/6 








No. 2 





No. I LEVEL CROSSING 

Suitable for a single track onty. 

Price 2/11 

LEVEL CROSSING 

(Electrical) 
Simitar to No. 1 Level Crossing, 

but fitted with electrical track. 

Pri 




GRAPH 
POLES 

Price 
per pair 

3/- 



WATER TANK 
Height 9 in. 

Fitted with flexible 

and valve lever. 

Price 5/f 



MANSELL 

WHEELS 
These solid die-cast 

Wheels can be fitted 

to Hornby Coaches, 

Vans. etc. 
Price per pair 3d, 






No. 2 LEVEL CROSSING 

Measures 13$ x 10J In., with two 
tracks of gauge O ra»Js in position. 

Price 4/11 

No, E2 LEVEL CROSSING 

(Electrical) 

Similar to Level Crossing No. 2 

excepting that a third rail is 

fitted In each of the two tracks. 

Price 6/1 1 





No. I SIGNAL CABIN 

Finished in colours. 

Price 2/6 



PLATELAYER'S HUT 

Price I/- 





No.2SIGNAL CABIN 

Dimensions :Height6* In., 
width 34 in,, length 6£ in. 
Roof and back open to 
allow Lever Frame to be 

fitted inside cabin if 
desired. Price 3/6 




No, I 
TURNTABLE 

Price I /I I 



VIADUCT 

VIADUCT 
VIADUCT 



Price 5/11 VIADUCT (Electrical) Price 7/6 

... Price 4/- 
Prl 



Centre Section only 



(Electrical) Centre Section only 



W ■ * 



4/6 




No. I ENGINE SHED 

This Shed will accommodate any Loco- 
motive and Tender with an overall length 
not exceeding 8J in. Price 13/9 



No. I STATION 

Length 16J In., width 6 fn., height 6 in 

No. 3 STATION 

Similar to No, 1 Station for dimensions and style, 
improved design, more strikingly coloured. 



Price 4/6 






but of an 
Price 5/6 





/ 










wfir ^ 




K 



* 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 







f 







There is practically no limit to the number o, r*u *orm*tiOiu ui« «ii ^e ouiii w;itrl ,u . . omes and 

Crossings. A supply of Raits is included in every Hornby Train Set, but the owner is certain!/ not getting the best 
out of his set if he h satisfied with merely running it round a simple oval track. The addition of extra Rails and 
of Points and Crossings to his equipment lends a delightful realism to the game and greatly enhances the fun. 



Rails for Electric Trains, Gauge 0, VA 



'/ 



EDSL2 



ECR 





EA1 
EA1 
EA1 



CURVED RAILS 

I -ft. Radius 
Curved rails 

Curved half rails 
Curved quarter rails 



* m n 



m m 



■ » » 



T * T 



4 * 









EA2 

EA2i 

EA2J 

EDC2 



2 -ft. Radius 

Curved raifs 
Curved half rails 



. . - 



m+* 






* # T 



■ J 1 



* 



per doz, 5/- 

.. A/6 

., 4/- 



per doz. 5/- 




CROSSINGS 



ECR 



■ ■ m 



* I- 4 



W ft * 



each 



ED5M 
EDSL1 






■ " - 




DSR2 



Bi 



EB1 

EB| 

EB1 
EDS1 



.. 



. . , 



* - - 



*.. 



i - - 




-v 



' 




CA2 



i 




EPR1 

EPL1 



EPR2 
EPL2 






Curved quarter rails 
Curved rails, double track 

STRAIGHT RAILS 

Straight rails 

Straight half rails 

Straight quarter rails ..• 

Straight rails, double track 

POINTS 

For I -ft. Radius Curves 

Right-hand points \ 
Left-hand points f 

For 2-ft, Radius Curves 
Right-hand potties 

Left-hand points 



™ 




J doz. 



per doz. 5/— 

4/6 

; v. 

J doz. 8/6 



... per pair 



5/9 







... 



per pair 7/6 



Acute-angle crossings 
Right-angle crossings 

DOUBLE SYMMETRICAL POINTS 

For I -ft. Radius Curves 

Double symmetrical points, right-hand, 
Double symmetrical points, left-hand, 

per pair 
For 2-ft. Radius Curves 



2/6 
2/6 



6/- 



EDSR2 Double symmetrical points, right-hand; 

EDSL2 Double symmetrical points, left-hand, 



EPPR2 
EPPL2 



PARALLEL POINTS 

Parallel points, right-hand 

— - ... « w 



per pair 7/ 



Parallel do 




left-hand 




per pair 7/ 



CROSSOVER POINTS 

Crossover points, right-hand 
ECOL2 Crossover points, left-hand 





per pair 24/- 



^^H 






• •• 



EMC20 Switch rails (20-volt) .« 

EMC6 Switch rails (6-voic) 

TCP20 Terminal connecting plates (20~volt) 

TCP6 Terminal connecting places (6-volt) 




•♦ 



!• 



ii 






Rails for Clockwork and Steam Trains, Gauge 0, 1*4 



// 



CURVED RAILS 



rt9 

MB9 

A1 

A1i 

A1| 

AB1 
A2 



Curved 



rails (9-in. Radius) 

Curved brake rails if 

Curved rails (1-ft. Radius) 

Curved hall rails 

Curved quarter rails 

Curved brake rails 

Curved rails (2-ft. Radius) 

Curved half raifs 
Curved quarter rails 

Curved brake rails 

Curved rails, double track 



per doz. 2/6 

each 3d* 



t 



if 

M 



■ ■ ■ 



a a a 



*** 



IP 

each 



■ * 



VI 



M 



• ■ 



lb 



■ * 



* * ■ 



per doz. 3/6 

3/- 

2/6 

4d. 
per doz. 3/6 

„ 3/- 

.. 2/6 

each 5d. 

Hoz. 6/- 



MR9 
ML9 



POINTS 
9-in, Radius (for MO 

ht-hand pornts ... 
Left-hand points 



Ri 



• . . 



Trains) 



■ ■ ■ 



m* ■ 






STRAIGHT RAILS 

Straight rails (for MO Trains) 



PR1 
PL1 



J 
For I -ft. Radius Curves 

Right-hand points ... 
Left-hand points 



per parr 3/ 



# f # 




per 




3/ 






PR2 
PL 2 
F5R2 
PSL2 



For 2-ft. Radius Curves 
Right-hand points ... 
Left-hand points .*. 
Points on solid base, right-hand 
Points on solid base, left-hand 



SPSR2 Points on solid base, right-hand 
SPSL2 Points on solid base, left-hand 



* ■ 



PPL2 




ft ft ft 



ft * * 



• ft fc 



** I 



- - » 



DS1 



CM 
CA2 

CR1 
CR2 



Straight rails *** 

Straight half rails 

Straight quarter rails 

Straight brake rails 

Straight brake and reverse raits*. 

Straight rails, double track 

CROSSINGS 

Acute-angle crossings (for 1-ft, 

radius track) 
Acute-; 



■«« 






per doz. 2/6 

3/6 

3/- 
2/6 




per pair 3/- 
per pair 8/6 






pair 5/- 
PSL2 but 



These points are similar to Points PSR 

they are not fitted with ground disc or for Hornby 



M 



ft 



*f 



Control, 









each 



oz. 



1/3 
5/3 



■ ■ * 



4 * * 



each 



2-ft, 



« -r ft 



angle crossings 
radius track) 
Right-angle crossings (for 1-ft. 
radius track) 

Right-angle crossings (for 2-ft, 

radius track) 



II 



* * ft 



• » i 



* * » 



• I I 



* ft * 



PPR2 
PPL2 



PARALLEL POINTS 

Parallel points, right-hand 

fits, left-hand 






per pair 3/6 



DSR1 
DSL1 



DOUBLE SYMMETRICAL POINTS 

For 1-ft* Radius Curves 




per pair 



Double sym. points, right-hand 
Double sym* points, left-hand 

For 2-ft* Radius Curves 

Double sym, point*, right-hand 1 lf 

Double sym. points, left-hand J 

CROSSOVER POINTS 










3/6 



COR2 Crossover points, right-hand 
COL2 Crossover points, left-hand 

Rail connecting plates 




. « ■ 



per pair 12/- 
| doz. 2d. 



COR2 



Many interesting illustrations and much useful information regarding Hornby Railway layouts are 
given in the booklets "How to plan your Hornby Railway," and "Hornby Layouts — I0Q Suggestions." 
Each of these booklets is obtainable from your dealer, price 3d», or from Meccano Ltd., Binns Road, 

Liverpool 1 3, price 4d. post free. 

i 









XXVI 




MECCANO MAGAZINE 












New Showrooms and Works are the largest in London devoted to the Model Maker. Come and see them 

will have an interesting time inspecting all the Finest Models, Tools and Materials which we stock. 



You 







Actual Photograph of 
Bond's British Permanent 



The 

Cheapest 
Super 

Detail 
Permanent 

Way 

IN ALL 
GAUGES 

FROM "OO" 

tot 




PRICES 



■ 



GAUGE 



O" PARTS 






Steel Rail, sheradtsed, per yd. 2d., 1/8 doz, yds. 
Brass Rail, per yd. 4id. ft 4/3 doz. yds. 
Cait Chain, slide-on fit, per 100 I/2. 
Cast Chairs, for wooden keys, per 100 
Keys, per 100 6d. 

Fishplates, per doz. 3d. 

Sleepers, stained correct colour, per 100 1/3 






Battens, 4 



section, per yd. 2Jd*, 1/3 doz 



Pins, appro*, 1,000, 6d. packet- 



Track Gauge, 

9d. each* 



rial, with 

■ 



chair jtg, 



All Prices Plus Postage. For Prices of Gauge "OO, 

■ 

1,"i"Scateand J "Scale, see General Catalogue. 




Miniature 






Clockwork Tram Sets having loco, 2 coaches and 
circle of rail. Price 8/-. Postage 7d* 

Electric Set having loco, 3 coaches and oval of rail. 

Price 23/-. Postage 8d, 
SEPARATE PARTS Clockwork Electric 



Tank Locomotive, Red, Green 
Passenger Coach, LN.E.R., LM.S 



■ ** 



Signals 
Telegraph Pole 
Reverse Trip for 

Locomotive... 
Signal Cabin .-* 

Tunnel 



* t fe 



* - ■ 



* * * 



4/» 
8d. 

6d. 

3d. 



Electric 



• f 4 



<• * * 



■ * 



*** 



* * r 



6d 



. . . 



(straight). 7| tn. long 
Raits (curved). 12 to circle 
Point Turnout to R.H. and 

L.H., 74 in. long ... 
Crossing (Scissor) ... 
Rail with Regulating Resistance 

Brake Rail for Clockwork Loco 

Postage extra. 



lOd. 

lid. 

. dozen 



8/6 
8d. 

6d. 
3d. 

4d. 

lOd. 

lid. 

Sd. each 



3/6 dozen 5d. each 



#** 



*•* 



\/9 

6d. 
4d, 



4/6 

2/3 
4/6 




Balsa Model Aeroplanes 

REAL FLYERS 

We are offering the finest American Kits of parts 
ever put on the market for the Model Aeroplane 
Builder, All kits Include all Balsa wood, Japanese 
tissue, wheels, pins, wire, elastic and full-size 

Drawing with instructions. 

Kits for 12* wing span Flying Models of the 
AERONCA. BOEING P12E, CURTISS PURSUIT. 
HELL DIVER, LOCKHEED VEGA, MONOCOUPE, 
PUSS MOTH, STINSON RELIANT. TAYLOR 

CUB, VULTEE VIA. WACO. 



. ■ 



PRICE 1 Od. Postage 3d. 

Kits for 24* wing span Flying Models of the 
STINSON RELIANT, WACO CUSTOM, MONO- 
COUPE, CONSOLIDATED P/30, FAIRCH1LD. 
HAWKER FIGHTER, CURTISS HAWK, 

RtCKMAN & MERRILL'S VULTEE. 



PRICE 2/~. Postage 6d 



Send for Bond's General Catalogue, Price 6d.; this also will interest you as its 200 pages list all the goods we stock. 



Euston 



Road 



Phone EUSton 544 1-2 






Established 1887 






Mi 



15 



/ 




ii 



Complete 
with rear 

la 




WILCO 



" CYCLE DYNAMO 

LIGHTING SETS 

arm the best value obtainable and will glvo 



This 



years of troublo-fro© service 

"Popular" model has both Battery and Dynamo 
lights controlled by rotary switch on top of lamp* 
6-volt dynamo has double set of ball bearings that give 
silent running and long life. It has a pilot light at the 
top of the 4* front and is finished in black and chro- 



Scmt 



Free 



lor 

Descriptive Leaf* 
let or 4d . for Com 
filet e 



mium, "WILCO 1 * 

Dynamo Sets from 

13/9 to 23/6. 



Catalogue. 




PRICE 




PRICE 

12 

(geared) (ungeared) 

Ironclad Geared Motor. 

4*6 volt. This fine motor is very 
powerful indeed and will work 

off Battery or A.C, mains by 

using a "WILCO" low voltage 
Transformer which is fitted with 



speed regulator, 




PRICE 
Post 4d. 




A FINE SHOCKING COIL 
You can have lots of innocent 
fun v/ith one of these. A 4.5-voIt 
battery operates it. 

L. WILKINSON 

204, Lower Addiscombe Rd, 

Croydon, Surrey 



PRICE 

Post 6d 






••WILCO" Geared Motor fitted with toothed 
gear wheel for driving "Meccano" models. Power- 
ful* Runs heavy models from 4-volt battery or 
accumulator, 

"WILCO" Low Voltage Transformer 

with speed regulator, reduces 200*250 vt* 

A,C, to 2-8 volts. Capacity 3 amperes. ,g m # jr 

Will drive small motors perfectly, | J Q 



PRICE 



"WILCO" 
DYNAMOS 




PRICE 




Post 
Free 



This Dynamo is the best for lighting "Meccano" 
models. Lights six 3.5-volt bulbs. 

I /40th h.p. 

A first class AX* Motor, 200/250 
volts. Self-lubricating bearings, 
silent running and excellent 
for Meccano model driving, 
also geared type for PRICE 
stgn display mechanism, 
cine-projectors, etc. 



21 



/ 



We have others from 17/6, in* 

eluding a beauty at 39/- for 
driving Dynamos and Models. 




4 



* - 



THE NEW SIMPLEX TYPEWRITER 



really 



oes produce beautifully typed letters, 



invitation cards, programmes, etc, with utmost 

is undoubtedly the best machine of its 



ever ma 



— r — • 

proud 



one any 
possess. 



would 




e 



Specimens o/ characters: 



t 



12 3 





6 



( 



Model 100 5'-; R 

T 21'- (68 forge 



6'6; C 

and small 





8'6; S 10'6 

characters] 



Guaranteed for 2 Years 

The improved 

TOY TYPEWRITER 

with 
carriage 

Prints 36 Characters on 
paper or card 6" wide, 









any length. Alphabet and 

numerals. 

MODEL R, each 




FROM ALL TOT 
DEALERS 



Write for list M C" t» 






MAGAZINE 



xxvu 






but 



littl 




expense with these 



it 





BRISTOL F2B 

Wma 91 in., Iimgth 7 in, A real!/ 
detailed model of this favourite 



Great War 




ter. Complete kit 



has everything needed, die cast 

■ 

prop, Lewis gun, cement, lacquers, 
fuselage and wings ready —/#* 
cur to ouliino. Carriage paid U 





A 




E 



Va in. to 1 ft. 




e addition of "Plasticine" to your mode 
II give them just that life-like appearance 
want to achieve. It won't take you many 



imagine 



realistic touch 



you can 



Bridges, Embankments, 



Tunnels, Trams, Cars, Aeroplanes, 

Cranes, and many 



■ 



amous mo 



material. 






marvellous 



Christmas 



Why not ask your Mother or Da 

Harbutt's "Plasticine" 



give you 



one 



for Christmas? Think of the fun you 



cou 



ave 



making 
invention, or forming 



models 



your own 



many we 



nown 



ticine" designs. Make your choice from 



"Plasticine" is obtain- BUILD A VILLAGE 






everywhere 



of six) 6d. each, post frec9d 

TRAVEL BOX (series 
six) 2'6 each, post free 3'-. 

guinea, tt is made in DESIGNER, 5'6 and 12'6, 



ranges in price up to a 



sixteen lovely colours. 



Write 



illustrated 



price list 



post free 6 f l and 13 f 5. 

COMPLETE MODELLER 

4 # -, post free 4 f 6* 

Post free rates for Qreal BTiiain* 

abroad extra. 



t 



HARBUTT'S PLASTICINE LTD 



BATHAMPTON. BATH 






k 





NIEUPORT 

Wing 61 in>, length 4i in. Detailed 

of fighting scouL used by 
English and French squadrons. Com- 
plete kit has all parrs needed, die 
c^st prop, Vkkers 

nose- cowl, cement two lacquers 
and detailed full-size plan. 

Carriage paid 





■ ■ 



2'6 




MR. MULLIGAN 

Wing 8 in. Most attractive replica 
of America's fastest cabin plane. 
Finished m cream and gold with 
printed lettering. Complete kit 

nas all parrs needed. 



Carriage paid 



2'6 



r 



r 



IWRITE FOR' 
CATALOGUE 



i 

i 






i 
i 



Send your 




NOW to 



I of solid models, 12 I 



t 



I 



• pages showing 20 kits, . 
enclose 1d. stamp. 







I 



I 



I All kits 2 '-extra abroad. I 



BANK HEY ST., BLACKPOOL 



l_~ 



I 




as 



■> » 



FAMILY 




8 /- DOWN bnngs y° u P rom P l delivery of a Riley "Home" Billiard 
J J . ^ , *^ w htch will solve all leisure time problems for your famf 
fnends. Pay balance monthly as you play. 7 days 1 Free Trial. Carriage paid, 
""•"* Billiard Table rests easily on ordinary table. Full range of s" 




Table 

and 





4 ft. 

5 ft, 

6 ft. 

7 ft, 

8 ft. 



4 ins. 
4 ins, 

4 ins. 

4 ins. 

4 his. 



X 
X 
X 
X 
X 



2 ft. 

2 ft. 

3 ft. 

3 ft. 

4 ft. 



4 ins. 

10 ins. 
4 

10 ins. 
4 ins. 




£7 
£11 




£21 







15 


10 











or in 20 

monthly 

payments 
of 



Rileys- 
prices* 

8/- 
10/3 
13/3 
17/- 



Riley "Cabriole" Model 
"Combine" Table. 6 fL 
size. £34-10-0, or easy 

U'rms. 




RILEY "COMBINE 



i t 




BILLIARD AND DINING TABLE 
Bring a new charm to your home 



" 



with a Riley "Combine." Ready- 
far either use In two minutes. 
Many attractive designs, oak or 




anv 




S are the largest makers 
Of full-size billiard tables in 
Gt. Britain. Also specialists 
in second-hand tables, 

repairs, etc. 



mahogany, with a size 

home, Cash prices from £22-10-0 

upwards, or on easy monthJy- 

on first payment,. 





accessories 



i 



32 



carriage paid. 

FREE BILLIARD 
Write for details. 



TABLES 



WRITE FOR FREE ART LIST 



E. J. RILEY LIMITED, DEAL WORKS, ACCRINGTOtf 



Dept. 3, 147 




Street London, E.C.I 




i 



»< 






# « # 



XXV111 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 






CUTTY SARK 

length 14 in. Very detailed model of famous 
clipper ship. Large and very detailed plan 

showing alt rigging, Kit has at) parts needed, 

balsa wood for hull, lacquer, fittings, mj 

cast racial ships, %-tc, Carriage pasd Hr • 







Triie'tO'Scal 




Show 



can build 



All ship "fans" will be fascinated by the building 
of these exact scale models. The work is made 



emg rea 



send your or 



e know 
now-money refun 



so easy by the full-size plans and all materials 



are 



satisfied. 







CONSTITUTION («*„*> 

Length 10 in. Famous American Civil War fighting 

ship, twenty deck cannons. Complete kit with 
clear full size plan, balsa wood, mash, *% / m 



cement, lacquers, 



Carriage 





CITY OF NEW YORK <wo 

Length I4in. Very fine and mosi ar tract tve model 
of interesting type salting ship* with auxiliary 
motor. All sails shown in full. Complete kit, j^ g 
with ship's boats* balsa, etc. Carriage paid 




(fight) 



SPANISH GALLEON 

Length 10 ia Splendid model ol fascinating period 



/ 









wood, masts, cement, lacquers. Carriage paid 



1 



■i 



: 



i 



f •■ 






• 



U 



f; 



• 



i 






fn< 



V ■ 






i 



i 



I 



+ i 



* 



CATALOGUE. Send lid. stamp for 
illustrated catalogue of 12 pages, 17 kits 
and large range of fittings, (All kits V 

postage extra abroad,) 



■i 



• 



x 






i 






*i ■ 



' ** 



SCHOONER BLUENOSE > 

Length 13 in. What a beauty! The sweetest and 
swiftest lines you could imagine Very clear plan 
with all details. Easily built with simple figging. 
Complete kit with balsa wood for hull, ship's 
boat, anchof, wheel, cement, lacquers. 



masts, &tc. 



Carriage paid 







* * 






JUST BEHIND THE TOWER 



■*vjr-\ .- .Vii ' ■* 








SNOOKER SETS 




■ 

GUARANTEED against any faults in manufacture 

for one year from dace of purchase. 

Our special method of manufacture enables us to 

offer them at POPULAR PRICES. 






Boxed complete 




Triangle. 



'Banda* Snooker Sets 

17 Ball. 22 Ball 



11- In. 

1Jin. 
1 I in. 



Hiii. 



» ■ * 



14/- 

15/- 

17/6 25/ 



set 



* # * 







. 20/ 
. 30/ 
, 40/ 



1 * in. 
1f in. 
1f in. 

2 in. 
2-jk in. (full size 



* * # 



• * . 




30/- 

42/- 

57/6 
70/- 

85/- 

)*>/- 



it 



• t 



• * 



• • 



it 



• t 



• P 



IP 



* ■* 



* * * 



• • * 



t « m 



It 



ft 



'Banda' Billiard Sets 

of three to match. 

1 £ in. 

Uln. 
1| in. 

1| in. 

1|in. 
1f in. 

i m. 

2 in. 

2tVIn. 



2/9 set 

V- 

3/6 

3/9 



ft + » 



■ I * 



5/- 
7/6 

10/ 

12/6 

13/6 



if 



1 1 






tt 
■t 



Write for Illustrated List M.M.G.3 

from the makers: 



Brookes & Adams Ltd., Hockley, B'ham, 19 



A set of eight Bowls, beautifully 
made in Black Bakelite, with 
"bias" moulded in position. 
Standard No. 2 "bias" will be 
supplied unless otherwise speci- 
fied. A lighter No. 1 "bias" 
smooth 






can 




desired, 
otted" in four colours in two 

combinations: 

R/Y Set. Red-White-Blue-Yellow. 

G/G Set. Green -Pink-Mauve-Grey. 



Boxed 
White 



complete 



with 



Rule 



plain 



Jack and small 



Rubber Mat. 



2 inch "Popular" size 1 0/6 pe 
2J inch "Senior" size 1 8/6 per set 



PLAYTIME TEA SET 



■ - 1 



v If 



I 1 






r 






CARPET BOWL* 



■■ » 



■ 



• 



C*»*f 



BA» bA 



-* 



1 -J 



•Ottt 



' 



'* 



i> ' 



i -lit i 



\ 



Compfoto 

for four. 









i 



i 






\ 



\ 



i 



ge 



■ 



d 



Tea 



roductio 



Band 



parts are sma 

size 
Every 



piece interchangeabl 

that in the event of accid 

damage 

become 



useless, 



pi 



not 



parts can be obtained from 1 
dealer at the prices below 
Cups and Saucers ... 
Cups or Saucers only 6d 

Plate 



Tea Pot (com pi 
Cream Jug ... 
Sugar 

Stainless M 






*+ ■ 









spoons 



' 



THE 




MAGAZINE 



XXIX 





REAL WORKING 




SEARCHLIGHTS. 300 ft. beam (as illus- 




trated), 3/6. 450 ft. beam, 4/1 1 . 
Searchlight, tremendous range, 7/1 1 . 



er 







ANTI-AIRCRAFT GUN. Fires on similar 

principle as 12" Howitzer. Price. 3/6. 

Both these guns are amazingly powerful and 
accurate and give a very loud report. The operation 

is extremely simple and reliable. 

Also model Traffic Signals, Harbours. Lighthouses. 

Aerodrome Floodlights. Aero Launching Decks with 
Indoor Flying Planes and other original models. 

OBTAINABLE AT ALl GOOD STORES AND TOY SHOPS 








HEW 



:E v: 






•3s 



wtv. 



v: . . 



■ a' 



ft". 



_T 1 



~\ S B M t 

Hip. ■ | vl 









;*: 



. ; ■' . 



. ■ ■ 



■■.».■.• ------ 



V. 

iVi ■--.. 






T_l I I'tV 



:-:■:' 



: ■ ■ 



*#* 



vu 



• — 1 



• ^ 






P: ""■" 



■*aa 



sK 



■-:.■.' 



... 



■>■■' 



>:■:•: 



.'-V 






v - 






:■:■:■> 



'>;■- 



-V- 

■V 






v 



:■ •: 



• ■ ' 



T -C 



v-v 



rini 



S3 



■-■. 



■ - jlJ 



•!■:■% 



-» -■, 



*.Ul 



w; 



WS 



>ft 



■HB 



■%\ 



- i. 



I ■ ■ 



B* X- 



lot 



.*:-: : 



3? 



■." 







nge 



1 2" HEAVY HOWITZER. Ra 

150ft. Length 10* inches. Price 1 0/6 

harmless rubber projectiles 




means of ordinary caps loaded in a shell 
case as in a real gun. Smoke and flash 

emitted from the barrel. 



Catalogue post free from the sole manufacturers and patentees 

ASTRA PHAROS LTD. 

LANDOR ROAD WORKS, SHEPHERDS BUSH, LONDON. W.I 2 

Telephone: SHEPHERDS Bush 2472 



ins, 



stations, signal 
sidings and 



buildings for our 






houses, 

people mho work 

a n d farms 
aniynals. 



stone 

scale ! 



real 



and 



tr ue 



* ■ 

J > 



> k > 



?•*»« 






/I 



: 



' ;■■ 



- 



. S ■ ■ t 



H rmse with Verandah t Box 2 









L Y 












l» 




KITS 

l/24th FULL SIZE 

DE HAVILLAND 



W 



Tiger Mo 




// 



a 



w 



Leopard Moth" 

NOW READY 





EACH 




LEOPARD 



i ns 



(Postage Abroad 

2/- Extra.) 



* 



ALL BRITI 




H 



FR 



! Send postcard for illustrated literature. 



AEROMODELS LTD 



Dopt. D, No. 
Building, 



5, First Floor, Wellington 
Strand, Liverpool, 2. 




&£*^ 






. 



IB - 



%i 






!' 






\V 



Sara 



« * J . 






*■■;* 









% - 



Here is a new and inter- 
esting booklet produced in 
answer to the popular de- 
mand of Hornby Railway 
enthusiasts. It contains a 
wide selection of attractive 
rail formations, varying Irom 
quite simple layouts to more am- 
bitious designs with double track. 
The best possible uses of Hornby 
Rails, Points and Crossings are 
clearly demonstrated* 
The booklet is obtainable (Price 

3d,) from any Meccano dealer, or 
(Price 4d,) post free, direct from 

MECCANO LIMITED 

Binns Road. Liverpool 13 



LOTT'S TUDOR BLOCKS Have a charm that is all their 
own. With them you can build delightful models of Old English half- 
timbered buildings with Tudor doors and windows. 



■ 






Box 1 
Box 2 
Box 3 



■ » 






9- m 



1 8 models, 3/- Box 4 
36 models, 5/6 Box 5 
54 models, 7/6 Box 6 



*» • 



72 models, 10/6 
90 models. 15/- 
96 models, 21/- 



another fascinating 



LOTT'S CHEMISTRY 

boys and girls. With its simple apparatus you can carry out all sorts of 

u can probe into chemistry's 

hidden 

a fully illustrated book of experiments written by a Doctor of Science 



ive 



set is complete with chemicals, apparatus 



Box 1 
Box 4 



... 



12/6 



Box 2 
Box 5 



* . 4 






999 



Box 3 
Box 6 



... 






. .. 



27/B 



I 



\orrs 



ct*** 515 * 






■as? 



. 






SPARES LIST 

To get the most out of 

your Chemistry Hobby 
you need th 

paratus 



wn 






t 



Spares List which is sent 
FREE on request. With 

is extra equipment 
you can enlarge the 



range 



your ex- 



periments and have 

aboratory fitted 



■ 



thing. 



Box 3, 8/6 



Ash your dealer for full particulars or write .' the manufacturers for 
of all products. [\d. stamp on P.C. or 1 flrf. stamp on letters, please.) 



illu strated lists 
DepU M.M. 






XXX 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 




.OUTHeHO 




Postal Slogan Collecting. S«nd 9d, for samples and 
pa rticulars. "Stampcrafts," 67. FarmRd..Edgwarc.Mx. 

FREE—BRITISH COLONIALS. Cannot repeat. Send 
postage and request approvals. Charlcsworth, 119, St. 
Luke's Road, Blackpool, S. 



"SEEING IS BELIEVING." My approvals are just 
the stamps you want; you cannot get better. Clement, 

Grove Street, Wantage. 



FREE. 30 different, including SOUTHERN RHODESIA 
CORONATION, Request approvals. Postage 2d. — Else, 
Carnarvon Grove, Sutton Road, Hufhwaite, Notts. 



FREE. S. RHODESIA CORONATION USED to 
cants for approvals. Send 2d, postage. Dept, M, 
Woodland Way, London, N.2L 




60 



200 



U- 



STAMPS ALL DIFFERENT. 100 Colonial I/-. 
Foreign !/-» 150 Foreign and Colonial 

20 Chile 1/-, 
E. A. B0VEY, 6, LOWER BROADPARK. DARTMOUTH. 



PICTORIAL COLONIALS ONLY 

I specialise in Brit. Col. approvals and will send you 
an absolute bargain selection of pictorial (Coronations 
if required!* Do you want current, recent or wha tissues? 

R. F. EMBLEY, 3 9, Cross St, t St.Annes-on-Sea, l anes. 

SOMETHING NEW!! 

60 Different Superb Used British Colonials, all Pio 
torinls, Silver Jubilees and Commemoratives, including 
6d. f 1/- and 50c. values for only 3/6 or to approval 

applicants 3/3. 

F. E. Turner* 96. Norman Avenue, Eccleshill. Bradford. 



STAMPS OTHERS HAVENT GOT 

JUBILEES, C0R0-. AIRMAILS, TRIANGS. etc. fromid. To 
approval applicants sending lid. postage, FREE PACK- 
ET of stamps including BRITISH COLONIALS, FIRST 
ISSUE BURMA & OBSOLETE MALTAS. No stamps Sent 

abroad. E. F. Hill (II). 37, Temple 6diHL. London. N.WJ 1 , 



REAL VALUE FOR MONEY! 

Whether you spend one shilling or one pound with 

mc your collection will grow more in quantity and 
quality than you thought possible. That's the Test! 

Common or rare approvals All countries. 

CAMPBELL, HALD0N AVENUE, TEIGNMOUTH. 




SO BRITISH COLONIALS 



3D. 



Different* Pictorials, Jubilee, Obsolete Issues, etc, 
to all applicants for approval sheers. Large selection 
on approval from four-a*pcnny at 15% to 75% below 

catalogue* No stamps sent abroad* 

J. & H, SMITH, 59* High Street, Rishton. BLACKBURN. 

Special Offer — Choose Your Free Stamp 

(II. Scarce used S. RHODESIA Coronation* 

[ZK MINT Jubilee, 5. Leone or Gold Coast, 

Any one of the above sent FREE to approval applicants 

sending postage Zd* Mint British Colonials from Id* 

No rubbish. State wants* 

J. H. WILSON, 48, LAMBETH ROAD. MIDDLESBROUGH. 



H. 



CORONATION SPECIAL CORONATION STAMPS 



includes Bermuda* 



(•Signifies Pictorials) 

i Is • 



vm ,i 



(both MINT), 



Australia and Canada Jubilees, Ceylon*, Br. Guiana*, 
Newfoundland*, R«4giuifl (Pi\ Baudouin], New 

Malava*, 10 different Canada including three 1937. 
three U.S.A.*, three used Coronations, and IN 
ADDITION another packet of 50 good mixed stamps. 
These two packets together for 6d, to applicants 

for our approval Sheets. (Without approvals 1/-,) 
SHIRLEY STAMP CO^ 19, Sandringham Av. f 8.W.20, 



_ 



STAMPS 



11 



A 



to 




rr 



FREE 

This month wc offer FREE to approval applicants 

enclosing Id. for postage. 



A 



ustratia, l/«* Lyre Bird, large issue, used. 






osnia. Set of 3 Assassination, mint, 

ay man Islands, £d. pictorial showing Islands, mint. 

72, Watting Street, 

Church Stretton, Shropshire* 



P. ROSS 



FREE 



WORTH WHILE" free 

6 IRISH COMMEMORATIVES 



Daniel O'Conndl. Shannon Barrage. 
Royal Dublin Society. Cross of Cong. 

Adoration of the Cross. Hurley Player. 
You have only to see my sheets to realise that they 
are worthy of theiT name *' Worth While." Why not 
send a lid. stamp (for postage) and ask to sec a selec- 
tion of these sheets and receive these 6 interesting 

Irish stamps GRATIS. 
"WORTH WHILE" sheets for stamps WORTH WHILE. 

JOS. H. GAZE. 21. Atwood Road. Oidsburv, Manchester. 



100 Different 




including Airmails, Coronations, etc., free to all 
applicants for my approval sheets. Liberal dis- 
count allowed. Write now. 

SPECIAL BUMPER PACKETS. 500 different 
foreign and colonial stamps. 2/6. 1,000 5/-. 

E. W. FRENCH 
(Oept. MM). 297. Brockiey Road, Brocklcy. S.E.4. 



CORONATION FIRST DAY COVER FREE 

One first day cover of GT # BRITAIN, stamped with 
the now obsolete Coronation stamp, and posted on 
May 12th. This cover is free to a II genuine applicants for 
Approvals enclosing 2d. for postage, Also a special free 

offer of one first day cover of GT. BRITAIN* GEORGE 

VI regular issue to all applicants spending 5/- on ap- 
provals. Write now as this offer cannot be 
CORONATIONS. Crown Colonics and Dominions, Mint 
and Used. Large stock of first day covers. Prices on 
application. K. HUMPHRIES, 

38, EAST STREET (Dept. 44), CHICHESTER, SUSSEX, 




Cheaper than Shop or Approval Stamps! CANADA (Coronation), GOLD COAST 



» 



100 ditf. Pictorials, told,; 8 used Coronations* 10id.: 

10 dig. Air Mails. Sd.J 150 diff. Jubilees, Commcmora* 
lives, Coronations! etc., 1/-; 50 diff. Persia, 9d.: 100 
British Colonials, Gd.: Set of 5 used New Russia Archi- 
tecture, 1/1 Id.: 1,000 unsortcd Brit, CoL and Foreign 
Stamps, ideal opportunity for "finds." t/2Jd. All 
postage free. Only postal orders accepted* Satisfaction 

guaranteed or money refunded. 

ARTHUR, 768, CHATSWORTH ROAD, CHESTERFIELD. 

(AH business done by correspondence, no callers please J 



Madagascar (picture). Chili {Columbus}, New Cale- 
donia, Mauritania (view), St. Pierre (picture), Malta, 
and 50 different others, oil post free for 3d, and in 

addition, all buyers of this packer who 

ASK TO SEE MY APPROVAL SHEETS 
receive a SET OF GUADELOUPE FREE. New Approval 
Sheets ready. Grand variety, Good discount. Write 

desired with all Colonics 



to*day. 





Dominions. 



F, G. R0WE. 69. EDGEHILL P.GAO, BOURNEMOUTH 



The British King George VI Coronation 
Stamp overprinted for each one of the 

three Morocco Agencies unused sent tree 



to all genuine applicants for approvals 

enclosing 2d. postage. 



Mention "Meccano Magazine. 



<i 



R 




HARRISON, Roydon, Ware 



FOREIGN & COLONIAL MIXTURE 



7/3 



A really high class mixture of British Colonials and 
better class Foreign, Guaranteed unsortcd and as 

received from the various Colonies. 

MIXED. 100 for Ik 250 for 2I-, 500 3i9, 1,000 
BRITISH COLS. 100 for 1/3. 250 r"or2/3,500 4/-. 1.000 8/-. 
FOREIGN. 100 for U-. 250 for 1/9, 500 3/3, 1,000 6/3. 
CORONATIONS, Crown Colonics and Dominions, Mint 
and Used. Large stock of First Day covers. Prices on 



J. H 




carton to 

Wallace. 1 & 2. York Road. Bonnor Regis. Sussex 



TRINIDAD 



**A 



*- * 



8d, 

3d. 



Unused CORONATION SET, tc. 2c, 8c. 

Used » *. ♦• lc»» - c «» 8c. 

Used CORON. SET, in blocks of four {rare) ... 3/- 

GEORGE V PICTORIALS. 3c. and 6c. unused... 6d. 

„ „ ,. higher values, 12c, 

and 24c. unused ... ... ... ...1/11 

An UNUSED EGYPTIAN Air Mail stamp and LAT- 
EST GEORGE VI GRENADA, will be sent FREE to 
all buyers from the above list who request approvals, 

Geoffrey E. Walker. Rookley. Solihull, Birmingham. 



CHEAP APPROVALS 

My beautiful Approval Selections are ideal for filling 
those vacant spaces. Pictorials, Colonials, and hard to 
get items. Selections from 4« Id. Free Gift Bi-coloured 

Persia all applicants. 
V. TAPP, 26, WINDSOR ROAD, BRISTOL. 6. 



A 





CORONATIONS 

from New Zealand, Malta, etc., to genuine applicants 

for my cheap approvals, Postage l|d, 
A, K. D0LWIN. 279, GRAYS INN ROAD. LONDON. W.C.I. 



Fractional H.P. Petrol Motors. All castings. Special 

6-c.c. castings 4/1 1. A 1 h«p, part tooled set 9/9, Cata 
logue 3d, Butler's, Wade Street. ' — ' ™" u " 



Litfclcover, Derby- 




MODELS 



Real bargains, just like new at low prices* Send 4|d* for 

our catalogue and save money. Models Purchased, 
H. L. GEORGE, It. FRIARS STREET. IPSWICH. 



BE TALL 



Your Height increased 
in 14 days or money 
bstckl 3-5 inches rapidly 
gained. Amazing Complete Cource senr for 5/- 

P.O.. or detail* free, Wnrc Stebbing System. 
Dept M.. 28. Dean Road, London, N.W.2. 



CINEMATOGRAPHS !?l*zifl 
CINEMATOGRAPH FILMS 

Standard Siie only* Write for Catalogue, post 
free. Sample Film and Catalogue t/- and 2/6. 

Filmeries Co.. 57. Lancaster Rd., Leytonstone. E.1 1 






For other Stamp Advertisements see pages 684 and 686 



■ 




be 



a 





u 



11 




o 







na 





you 




* 






fe 



What you put into your head while still 
young decides what sort of a position you 
will occupy later on. Brain, trained brain, 
is the power that wins a position of respon- 
sibility and a good income. You must be 
systematically trained in the work of your 
choice, and that, usually, is only possible 
in spare time. "Tell me how a young man 



spends his evening hours/' a great industrial 




leader has said, "and I'll tell you whether 
he will achieve success or remain a sub- 
ordinate," 

The International Correspondence 
Schools offer you the training you may need 




There is none better, none more convenient 
for the student. It was the I.C.S. that made 
the postal method of instruction what it is 
today, and the I.C.S. remains the greatest 
institution of its kind in the w 

LC.S. Courses do not cost more than 
those of other reputable schools teaching by 
correspondence; indeed, in some cases they 
cost less. An important consideration lies in 
the fact that all I.C.S. instruction books an J 
special textbooks are supplied without extra 



ch 




The students of many postal con- 



cerns have to buy the books required, that 
often involving an expenditure of several 

pounds. 

WRITE TO-DAY FOR FREE BOOKLET 
and advice on any one or more of the 

following subjects: 



ACCOUNTANCY 

ADVERTISING 

AERONAUtlCAL ENG. 

AGRICULTURE 

AIR CONDITIONING 
ARCHITECTURE 

BOOK-KEEPING 
BUILDING 
CHEMICAL ENG. 
COMMERCIAL ART 
COMMERCIAL TRAINING 
CIVIL ENGINEERING 

DIESEL ENGINEERING 

DRAUGHTSMANSHIP 

ELECTRICAL ENG. 
FRENCH AND SPANISH 

GENERAL EDUCATION 
HORTlCULlUKt 

INSURANCE 



JOURNALISM 
MARINE ENGINEERING 
MECHANICAL ENG. 

MINING 

MOTOR ENGINEERING 

PLUMBING 

RADIO 

SALESMANSHIP 

SANITARY ENG. 

SCIENTIFIC M'G'MENT 

SECRETARIAL WORK 

SHORT-STORY WRITING 

SURVEYING 

TELEVISION 

TEXTILE MANUF'G 
WORKS MANAGEMENT 

WINDOW DRESSING 

WOODWORKING 



EXAMINATIONS: 

Technical, Professional. Civil Service, Matriculation 



INTERNATIONAL 
CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS LTD. 










218. 



International Buildings 



Klngsway, London, W.C.2 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 











IS 



the finest 





butter 




WILLIAM CRAWFORD & SONS LTD., 
EDINBURGH • LIVERPOOL & LONDON 




MODEL MICROSCOPES 

No. t lOOx 4/6. No. I 200x 8/6.^ No. 3 Rack focussing 
15/-. No. 4 Triple power 25/-. Solid bases, adjustable, 
guaranteed. C. A. MAXWELL. F.S.M.C. 

Optician. 95. HIGH STREET. SCUNTHORPE. 



PRICES FROM: 



post free) 

EQUIP YOUR OWN 
LABORATORY WITH 

APPARATUS AND 
CHEMICALS. 



WRITE FOR LATEST CATALOGU 



eFREEI 



(Scientific Dept. G.) f 60, High St, 

Stoke Newington. London, N.16 



MODEL STEAM FITTINGS 

and MARINE 
ENGINES 

DOUBLE ACTING 
PISTON VALVE 



J in^bore. j in. stroke. 

. Postage 4d. 

Oscillating fe\n. x1 in. 

4 6 

Miniature fin. > $ in. 



V 



fflLliUUi3UI fctfllf 



PROPELLER SHAFTS 

Complete stern tube and gland. 



Rigid 7 ins. 

Flex 9?"ins. 



• # * 



• > * 



* f • 



• / f Postage 3d 



Propellers. 1 i ins. fid. 2 ins. I Zd. Post 2d 

Write /or Catalogue, 2d, 

F. YATES & SON LTD , 

144. CHURCH ST.. KENSINGTON. LONDON. W.B, 



XXXI 




i 



WITH 




CRYSTAL PALACE 




Ask 




or 




new 



won 




er 






uctions 



The Little Giant: id. 




new "big noise" 



Royal Salutes: 3 A— another loud BANQi 

Crystal Cascades: Id., 2d. t 4d„ 6d* 



ThunderStorms: 2d, t 4d. t 6d 






Gloria Roman 



Candles: 2d., 4d„ 6d. & up to 4 



t 






King George VI and 

Queen Elizabeth Rockets: 1'- upwards 



ON 




EVERYWHERE 




"ELECTRIC HOME CINEMAS STANDARD FILMS. 

Bargain lists free. Pictures, 109, Kenlor. Tooting. 



?i 




MOULDS for casting lead Soldiers. Cowboys, Ani- 
mals, etc. Sample mould 2/9. Catalogue 2d. Artec, 
2, Waldergravc Park, Twickenham. ^^ 

THE WEBLEY SERVICE AIR RIFLE 

UCtKSt REQUIRED TO OL/BCHASi 

This extremely 

accurate and power-* 

Jul Aii Rifle is ideal for 

Target Practice in the garden 

or for exterminating Rats and 

similar Vermin. 
ra 22 or 177 With taftight and p««p«gh«. 

Wtfcltt § Stiff Lfe. 17, Wmmii !U BMoffcgm 4 



VttVff fOft 

Qisatirriva 




xxxit 





MAGAZINE 



READERS' SALES 

Readers should note tlmt all advert istments of Hornby 
Trains and ether Meccano products included in this 
column relate to items no longer featured in the catalogue. 
Advertisements of current products cannot be accepted 
for this column. 

Sale. Beck's Retort Stand complete, Retort, Liebig's 
Condenser, all almost new, two lengths Flexible Metal 

Bunseti. Cash only. Offers? — L&wson, 192> 
Inverkip Road, Greenock. N.B. 

Breaking Collection. 280 Stamps, including 
Abyssinian worth 10/-. Take 25/- or nearest ofler. — • 

Anderson, 15, Standerton Road, Springs, Transvaal, 
South Africa. 







Sale, 3 Cylinder Reversing Stationary Engine and 
Boiler with countershaft. Month old, Used four times, 

29/6.— Cowles, 3, Church Road. 




Cost 49/6. 
Goudhurst, Kent- 

Sale. Set 5 Red-Green Meccano and extras, 30/-*. 

Also 60 recent (193U onwards) "Meccano Magazines/ 1 

7/6* — Quarmby, Eype, Hartley Way, Surrey, 




Short Waver, 1 -valve, very powerful, receives 
America, japan, etc. with valve 19/6, without 17/6, 

paid. Stamp particulars— 63 , Avenue Ap- 
proach, Bury St. Edmunds. 

No, 4 Red-Green Meccano, Motor and Accessories. 
Cost £3/10/-, Sell 35/-.— 1 1 3 P Orchard Way, Croydon. 

Collection in two Albums, Make nice gift, 10/ 
Jones, 11, Ridge Crest, Enfield, Middlesex. 

P&th£ Imp Projector 9.5 Motor Drive Super Attach* 
meat (almost new) in case. Cost £7/12/6. Bargain 
£4/15/-. — Maxwell, 95, High Street, Scunthorpe. 

For Sale. Approximately 800 Colonial, 2,900 Foreign 

Collector disposing; What otters? — Harry 

Crooks, 63, Pirn's Avenue, Belfast- 
Sale* Engine, Kails, Wagons 

offers. Details— Box 1101. 

Sale, Bowman Steam 
unused. 12/6.— Warden, 
Rochester. 




etc. Gauge Q. 15/- or 




. Model 300, almost 
King Edward Road, 



Sale, Chemicals and Laboratory Apparatus. Bargain 
prices. Stamp list. — Smith, Turlington, Chard. 

50 "Boys* Friend" Library, 17 "Schoolboys* Own" 
Library, 10 Sexton Blake, 12/6 lot.— T* Gaspers, 43, 

Beech Avenue, Radlctt, i tarts. 

No, 5 Red-Green Meccano in Cabinet with Meccano 

Clockwork Engine, also Primus Engineering (metal 
and wood), £2/10/- or nearest ofier. Apply — Wood, 
Brentwood, Grendon Avenue, Oldhani, Lanes. 







,, Books, 

Collection Butterflies, 'Cigarette Cards, for Fishing 
Tackle or Stamps.— "Philatelist/* 3, Dawson Road, 
Birmingham 21, 

Wanted* "Gems,** January 1931 to July 1933, State 

price.— Hetheringtoa, Hulme Hall, Victoria Park, 
Manchester. 



"Railway Wonders of the World," 
unbound, perfect condition* 10/- post free 
198, Eastern Avenue, llford. 



first volume, 



George, 



Sale. 120 "Magnets/ 1 August 1935 to October 1937, 
None missing. What offers?— B. Rumbles, 80, Nether- 
lands Road, New Bamet, HcrU. 

SaJe. 92/- worth Red-Green Meccano, including large 
Clockwork Motor. Good condition. 47/6,-— Jordan, 16, 
Old Farlmgh Road, Selsdon, Surrey, 

No. 7 Meccano, Red-Green, Enamelled Cabinet, 
condition perfect, recently checked. On view at Mcnston, 
Leeds. Accept £12, or near oiler,— Hoult, Balliol, 
Oxford, 

For Sale* 25/- Basset t* Low ke Clockwork Engine, 
excellent condition. Take 15/-. Write — D* W. 
Canjiadine, 50, Gade Avenue, Watford, Herts* 

For Sale, Blank Automatic, new, 10/6. £7 Books, 
Tennis Racquet, etc.— Taylor, 6 f Faithlie 

Fraserburgh, 



Street, 



For Sale. Hornby Railway, purchased 1929/30 but 
in good condition, complete with Track, Signals, 
Rolling Stock and two Locos, including fittings for 
Hornby Control System; £3, or would separate. Also 
number of "Meccano Magazines.** Stamp- for list. — 
Staple, Tonbridge, Kent. 

For Sale. £5 Bassett-Lowkc Electric Engine, 2 

Clockwork Engines, Rolling Stock, 50 ft, Electric Rails, 
4 Points, 2 Stations, etc. 1 excellent condition. Send 
stamp for details. — P. 
London, S*W.7. 

Gauge O (Milbro and L.M.C.) Railway goods, Minic 
Cars. Stamp list.— Peal, 182, Merrow Street, London, 
S.E.17. 



Copp, 39E t Emperors Gate, 



Boy f s Rudge Whit worth Bicycle, good condition, 
40/-.— P. Cooper, Oak Drive, Fallowfield, Manchester* 

For Sale* Five Boy's Own Paper Albums for 6/6, 
More Books. Particulars write — Atkins, 45a, London 
Road, St. Leonards. 

Sale. 9.5 ih.hl Mains Projector. Variable Resistance, 
3 Mickey Mouse and Charlie Chaplin Films- Good 
condition. Cost £3/10/-, Offers*— Soye, Lough Road, 
Lurgan, Ireland. 

For Sale* 3- Valve G.E»C. Wireless complete. Valves, 
Batteries, Loudspeaker, etc, 30/- or offer. — Coulson, 
273, Ings Road, HulL 

Sale. No. 7 Red-Green Enamelled Meccano, Wood 
Cabinet, complete with Electric Motor and Trans- 
former, In excellent condition* £12 or nearest offer. — 

Canivfck, 28, Bull Royd Crescent, Allerton Road, 
Bradford, 



i 

i 
i 




is Month's Special Articles 



4 1 i 



Air News , . . 

America's Greatest Dam 






Books to Read 



- - * 



* # • 



* # n 



■ ■ 



• ■ I 



r ¥ * 



■ pa 



■ B 



* * 4 



-i 

I 
I 

Page J 
642 I 



Competition Corner 
Engineering News 
Fireside Fun 

Footplate I Mm on the "Cork Mail" 
From Our Readers 



■ ■ 



4 + 4 



p- n 



... 



» i i 



Guild Pages 

Hornby Railway Company Pages 
Interesting Triangular Station 
Longest Bridge in Europe 



mm* 



w *_* 



* * * 



Ml 



•m » r 



m ■ ■ 



#4 <¥ 



640 
662 

648 
690 



I 

I 

i 



644 | 

666 I 
676-7 I 



Making of Steel 



.. . 



. I * 



. . . 



Meccano Model-Building Competition 



679-683 

678 
656 

638 

674 



I 
I 

I 
1 
I 
I 



Meccano Model-Building Competition Results 675 I 



N el h erlands Ai re raf t 

■ 

New Meccano Models **• 
Oil Engines for Submarines 
11 Olympic's" Last Voyage 

Our Wonderful World ... 

Railway News •-*> 

Railways of Iraq 



# ■ * 



652 r 



« ** 



• * 



... 668, 672 

670 

661 



I 

I 

I 
I 



* ■ ► 



• i m 



m a 



* ■ ■ 



■ f 



. . . 




Regulating the Flow of a River 
Searching for Oil in Great Britain 



i 



Stamp Collecting 



* * 



•+-* 



j Stamp Gossip 

1 With the Model-buildere 

i. 



i * m 



■ * m 



• r m 



■ * * 



» * *■ 



V * * 



■ ■ fe 



9 • * 



65S | 

I 

65Q I 

I 

647 ' 



f+f> 




685 
687 



: i 



i 
i 



671 | 
1 




f 



000 




PHOTOGRAPHS 

Send 3d. for specimen postcard and our Illustrated 
Lists of over 1 .000 different real photographs of 

Liners* Freighters, etc., including Cunard-Whtte Star, 
Harrison, Blue Funnel, etc., 2d. each, 2[- per dozen, 

: free. Photographs of the new liners: "Awatea/* 



• 19 



stage tree. Photograph 
"City of Benares, 11 and "Queen Mary" now available. 



B. & A. FEILDEN (M.M.). 

12. Harlech Road, Blundellsands. Liverpool. 23* Eng. 



(Trade Enquiries Invited.) 



RAILWAYS. SHIPS & AEROPLANES 

PHOTOGRAPHS: OVER 3,000 SUBJECTS, 

Over 54,000 postcards In stock. 

Send 4d. (ot list and specimen card (stating section). 

NEW ISSUES: 

"LOCOMOTIVE STOCK OF THE MAIN LINE 
COMPANIES" as at Dec. 1936. Price 119 post free. 

REAL PHOTOGRAPHS CO. 

(Dept. M), COOPERS BUILDINGS, LIVERPOOL, 1. 



CIGARETTE 



CARD 



COLLECTORS 



Send for 



OUR NEW FREE LIST OF 



- — 






* SERIES 



Post Free. 

THE STANDARD CATALOGUE 
SECOND (1937) EDITION 

available series, with many dates ot issue, 
much general information, and full details of 

Albums and Accessories. 

Price 1*2— Abroad 1'6* Post Free. 



CIGARETTE CARDS AND HOW TO 






The first c 



COLLECT THEM 

By I. O. Evans. 

e book on the subject 



8vO. Copiously illustrated. Prie* 3'6. Post Froe 



THE 



CIGARETTE CARD NEWS" 



The Card Col teeters' Monthly Journal, 



has now been 



ENLARGED 






TWENTY PAGES 






and 



GREATLY IMPROVED, WITH MANY 









Specimen Copy 3 id. Six Months' Subscription 1'9, 

both Post Ft 

THE LONDON CIGARETTE CARD CO. LTD., 



Room 



Wollasley Rood, Chlswlck 
LONDON, W.4. 











Registered at G.P.0. f London 9 for transmission by 

Canadian Magazine Post 

EDITORIAL AND ADVERTISING OFFICE; 

Liverpool 13, England. 

Telegrams: "Meccano, .Liverpool.* 1 

Publication Date, The "MMr is published on 
the 1st of each month and may be ordered from any 
Meccano dealer, or from any bookstall or newsagent, 
price 6d. per copy. It will be mailed direct from 
this office. 4/- for six issues and 8/- for twelve issues. 

To Contributors. The Editor will consider articles 
and photographs of general interest and payment will 
be made for those published. Whilst every care will 
be taken of articles, etc., submitted, the Editor cannot 

or damage. A 
testae should 
returned if 
unacceptable. 

Readers* Sales and Wants. Private advert i semen ts 

(i.e., not trade) are charged Id. per word, minimum 1/-, 
Cash with order* Editorial and Advertising matters 
should not be dealt with on the same sheet of paper- 
Small Advertisements, 1/6 per line (average seven 

f or 16/^ per inch (average 12 lines 
to the inch). Cash with order. 

Display. Quotations for space bookings, and 
latest net sale figures, will be sent on request, 

Pres* Day, etc. Copy should be sent as early in 
the month as possible for insertion in following issue. 
We usually close for press on or before 6lh of each 
month for following issue. Half-tone blocks up to 
100 screen, 



accept responsibility for any loss 
stamped addressed envelope of the requisit 
be sent where the contribution is to be 








LIGHTER THAN AIR! 

A REAL AERIAL CRUISER. Salf-ffltino. 1937 MODEL 

buoyant and graceful, floats aloft for hours. 
Elastic Motor propulsion and Rudder Control. 
For Indoor or Outdoor Flying. 36 in* long, 

12 in. diameter. 
CLARK-PRESTON, Manufacturers, Post 4d. 

Dept. MM. 2A. Alexandra Road, Leigh-on-Sea, Essex 



PRICE 

3/6 






HO*' IT 
WORKS 



LIST NOV T.I 




Valvespoufc 

OILERS 

the oilcan for your outfit 
very latest-you can't lose the top 
when closed it is quite safe to carry in 



\ 





pocket 



sorts of models. 



rn your Ironmonger 

i i * i • i ■ » 



send 



celluloid oiler and coloured brochure showing 

all the models. 

PARKER -HALE LTD. 

Birmingham, 



MODEL RAILWAY AGENTS 






LTD. 
3 56, High Street, Sutton, Surrey 

Telephone: Vigilant 4591 

12, Station Road, East Horsley 



Telephone; East Hors 




2588 



Agents forBassett'Lowkc, Leeds Model Co., MilBro, 

Merco, Trix* Railway Boohs and Publications 






WEBLEY air pistols 



Marvellously 

accurate for 

target practice 

No license 





Senior 45/-, Mark l32'6, 
Junior 21'*, Weblej Air Rifle 95'* 

Writt for Last, Wiblit & Scott Ltd. 

87, WlAMAN StIUT, BlftUlNGBAM 











% 



THE 







MAGAZIin 



i^ 




The 1937*8 issue ol tho Hornby Book oF Trains is the finest that has ever been 
produced. Ii contains splendid articles, ki'lly illustrated by photographs, dealing v/ith 
British express trains and locomotives, the mysteries of an engine shed, the fascination o( 
operating a miniature railway, and other interesting topics. 



n addition the book forms a complete catalogue o\ Hornby Trams tor electric and 
clockwork railways. The Hornby Locomotives. Rolling Stock and Accessories are 

beautilully illustrated in full colour. 



How to o 




am 




e 



Book 



Tti-' Hornby Book of Trains may be* oblflined from any Meccano dealer, price 3d.. 01 direct from Meccano ltd. 
[Den 1 A AA L Binns Road. Liverpool 13, price Aid post Iree. |n the* lalfer r.ase a rerr.ir ten-re in '.lamps should be sent 
c.r.d ins name and address of the sender should be clearly written. 

Readers living in Acj.lralia. New Zealand or South Africa who require copies should send their postal orders 
for 8H (which includes postage) lo the ad.dres-0* gsv^n below, The Meccano Branch at Toronto will deal wirh 

Can^dtan orr/er 6 and rhe price fs 12 cents pos.paid 

r ■ ■ 

Readers fivmg in countries other than ihose mentioned should order from Meccano Lid., Btnns. Road. Liverpool 13, 
sending 6d. m stamps with their order. 



Overseas 




encies: 



AUSTRALIA: E C, facio « Co , 52. CUir?nco Sr , &*n«¥ [P.O. Box 1832k.) 

NfW iEALANlp Model? Limited, FaytV's Euifd.i gs, Anzac Avenge, Auck'and C 1 (P.O. Bu* 129}. 

SOUTH AFRICA Arthur E Kaffi'.., 142. * ar ol Street, Jotenrsifetftfl (P.O. to* 11591. 

CANADA. Meccano Ltd., 187-189, O.uich Sire el. Toronto. 



Published 




MECCANO LTD. 




A.M.), BINNS ROAD, LIVERPOOL 13 



■ 




A 



SELECTION FROM 



THE 



HORNBY TRAIN 



1937 RANGE 

TS 



OF 





You have spent many happy hours watch- 
ing real trains at work. Now start a railway 

of your own and enjoy the thrill oi operating 



Engines, Coaches, Wagons, Signals and 
Points on actual railway principles. It's 
the most fascinating; pastime in the world! 




■ 



— 

Ho'nby No. 3c Passenger Set. Reversing (Clockwork). Price 47/6 




Hornby Trains represent the latest 
ailway practice, and the system is complete 

ri practically every detail. There are Loco- 
motives driven by electric motors or by clock- 
work. The Rolling Stock includes Pullman Cars, 






ordinary Coaches and Guard's Vans 
passenger services, and numerous 
and Vans for freiaht working. 

The Accessories are now better than ever 



No. 2 Special Passenger Set. Reversing (Clockwork). Price 52/- 












before, while with the Rails, Points and 
Crossings an endless variety of layouts can 



be constructed, 

Clockwork Trains, 







for Electric and 



Hornby Train Sets are available at prices 



ranging from 1 5/- to 



mod 
mode 




- ! 



Of 




ific 



eh and 4/1 1 to 58/6 iot Clockwork 



3oeis 




Hornby E120 Special Tank Goods Set. Automatic Reversing (20-volt Electric). Price 40/- 



A SELECTION FROM THE RANGE OF HORNBY LOCOMOTIVES 



Electric Models 





Electric Models 

EM120 (20-volt} or EM16 (6-voli) Locomo- 

Price 8/( 



live (non-reversing). 




EO20 (20-volt) Loco 




o 



(reversing). 
Price 1 9/ 



E220 (20-volt} Special Locomotive (auto 



EMI20 (20-volt) or EAM6 (6-voll) 

ELECTRIC LOCOMOTIVE 



_ 



EO20 (20-volt) ELECTRIC 

LOCOMOTIVE 



E220 (20-volt) SPECIAL 
ELECTRIC LOCOMOTIVE 



matic reversing] 



Price 37/C 




Clockw 



No. O -"SILVER LINK 
LOCOMOTIVE 



ii 






Models 



No. O "Silver Link" (reversing). Price 3/6 

No. 1 Special Locomotive (reversing). 






Pri 



ce 15/9 









No, 1 SPECIAL LOCOMOTIVE 



No, 2 SPECIAL TANK 
LOCOMOTIVE 



No. 2 Special Tank 







Price 19/6 



PRODUCT Or 

MFCCANO LIMITED 




NNS ROAD 



li v^ERPOOL 



13 



Pumc3itt£u u\ aU&CA&O f.Tf>„ ttiss* Ra\n. Liverpool 13, En'ola-md 

T*rhiteJ by l#hh \iitiu> *n Ud. Lt&tt ani Lou-fa**